Dan Schultz / WNPR

Widening highways can be a controversial topic. Some say it just encourages congestion, but the governor said it’ll improve the state's bottom line.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew says there isn't much time. Congress and the White House face two big deadlines to fund the government. It will be an intricate maneuver to meet both deadlines even as congressional leadership changes. And in an interview with NPR, Lew described behind-the-scenes negotiations meant to avert a last-minute crisis.

"There are conversations going on at a staff level," Lew told NPR's Steve Inskeep, "and I think the key is for Democrats and Republicans [in Congress] to talk to each other."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Last March, Onyeka Obiocha of Happiness Lab at the Grove coffee shop in New Haven stepped outside to find his car had been towed.

When he finally got it back and was driving home to Hartford, the car blew a head gasket. The repair bill was prohibitive, so Obiocha said goodbye to owning a car.

Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro is calling on the Obama administration to release the text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, now that Pacific nations have reached an agreement in principle on the pact.

"We, the trade ministers ... are pleased to announce that we have successfully concluded the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiation," U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman announced Monday morning, to a loud round of applause.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy is less than a year into his second term in office and it doesn’t look like it will be any easier than the first term.

The budget remains in a state of permanent fiscal crisis, forcing a $100 million cut to the budget, just months into a new fiscal year. Those cuts, especially the ones hitting social services and hospitals, have been criticized by Republicans and Democrats alike, and there are calls from editorial boards for a special session to reinstate some of the funding and find new ways to plug budget holes. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy had his own sobering assessment of the state’s economic competitiveness Thursday as he addressed the Stamford Chamber of Commerce.

 A Vermont boot brand is coming back after several years off the market — a return that is a déjà vu experience for the boots' creator.

A top executive with MGM Resorts International will be in Springfield next week to publically assure the company’s commitment to build a casino in the city.

A private meeting between MGM President Bill Hornbuckle and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, with a press conference to follow, was arranged after MGM disclosed plans to eliminate a 25-story hotel tower from its planned casino and substitute a more modest hotel design. 

“Skyrocketing” construction costs were blamed for the change. 

KentWeakley/iStock / Thinkstock

According to an annual report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition, Connecticut is home to the eighth-priciest rental market in the nation.

The average amount needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment is now a staggering $24.29 per hour. For a person making minimum wage, that means working 106 hours each week. 

At Volkswagen, damage control is in full swing after it was revealed the automaker had, for seven years, equipped its vehicles with software capable of fooling emission tests.

A top state gambling official says New York remains on track to award up to three long-awaited casino licenses before the end of the year.

Frankieleon / Creative Commons

There was a time when hard work brought most Americans a decent wage, a secure life, and opportunities to aim for a better life. George Packer says that's no longer the case for too many Americans.

Institutions that once anchored middle-class Americans are either collapsing or morphing into faceless institutions that benefit the wealthy, Packer says. Health and educational outcomes are significantly lower for the poor, who are also incarcerated at higher rates. 

Parker Knight / Creative Commons

Around the middle of the twentieth century, a period of agricultural advancement known as the Green Revolution brought on one of the greatest population booms in history. 

Plans by the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe to build a casino in Taunton, Massachusetts, will not affect Twin River's quest to create a so-called "convenience casino" in Tiverton, a Twin River spokeswoman said Monday,

"It has no bearing on our plans in Tiverton," spokesman Patti Doyle said.

The Mashpee Wampanoags are staging a noon Monday news conference at Taunton City Hall to discuss their plans.

A new study shows people exited New York in droves in 2013, and while there is disagreement as to why they left,  another report suggests taxes could be playing a significant role.

purple_onion / Creative Commons

It wasn’t that many years ago that gambling was seen as a pretty good bet when it comes to improving the state’s economic situation. In Connecticut, two tribal casinos were thriving and spinning off slot revenues into the general fund. Then came the recession and declining revenues just as other states started to get into the gambling business.

Now, in a move that couldn’t have been predicted a decade ago, both state tribes have agreed to work together on a new casino to help stave off a threat from Massachusetts. That plan is now under legal attack.


A Connecticut couple filed suit earlier this year alleging that they had been duped into investing a substantial amount of money into the Back9Network -- a golf lifestyle channel that eventually ceased its operations. Now, a judge this week has ruled that their lawsuit can proceed.

New Lebanon, New York is a town of roughly 2,300 people nestled in between the Berkshire Mountains and the Hudson Valley. In a town that small you might wonder why anyone would stop other than to fill up the gas tank or grab a bite to eat, never mind a tourist attraction. But what if the attraction was life in a small town itself? WAMC’s Jim Levulis explores an effort to immerse people in the backbone of America.

The plan for a new stadium for the Pawtucket Red Sox in Providence has hit a roadblock. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses how this field of dreams turned into a nightmare.

Chuck Miller / Creative Commons

A new commission charged with improving Connecticut's economic competitiveness wants input on exactly why companies like General Electric don't believe the state is a good place to do business. 

United Technologies Corp.

United Technologies Corp. officials have announced a reorganization that includes running the subsidiaries Otis Elevator and United Technologies Climate, Controls and Security as stand-alone businesses with new presidents. 

JD Lasica / Creative Commons

General Electric’s CEO said the company will decide in the fourth quarter of this year whether to move out of Connecticut.

Jeff Immelt spoke publicly for the first time about the possibility of the relocation in an interview on CNBC.

The tribes that own Connecticut’s two casinos signed a partnership today to pursue developing a third casino to compete with the planned MGM Resorts casino in Springfield.

MGM has denied it might downsize the $800 million dollar hotel-casino complex planned in Springfield if faced with competition close by in Connecticut. 

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno Thursday said he expects MGM to build a resort casino that will employ 3,000 people, as promised.

epSos .de / flickr creative commons

Recently Yale economist Robert Shiller said in an essay in The New York Times that no one can say for certain what the stock market drop means. He did, however, say we'd all be right to exercise great caution now.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In June, General Electric confirmed it’s considering a move out of Connecticut. The news came amid a state budget battle over corporate tax hikes. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut’s tourism industry is seeing a healthy rebound this year, more than doubling national growth rates. 

Hiring an employee is an expensive proposition. Workers' compensation, social security and other expenses can run thousands of dollars a year, so it's no surprise that companies often try to reduce expenses keeping workers off the payroll, calling them independent contractors instead.

But sometimes they do so in violation of state law. And in a new report, State Auditor Doug Hoffer says the state isn't doing enough to stop a practice known as "misclassification."

Even as state and federal officials direct new money and staffing to water quality efforts across the state, the networks of pipes that bring water to and from Vermont homes and businesses are crumbling beneath their feet.

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, secession was on the minds of protesters in New York this weekend. Hundreds turned out for a rally in Bainbridge in Chenango County. Many live within miles of the Pennsylvania border and believe secession could have a large economic impact on their communities.