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demographics

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state of Connecticut is mired in a financial crisis. Facing a projected $1.7 billion deficit over the next two years, the General Assembly has yet to agree on a new budget to cover that gap while maintaining crucial services. Earlier this week, an article published in The Atlantic asked the question, "What on Earth is Wrong with Connecticut?"

Fr. Gaurav Shroff flickr.com/photos/gashwin/14038730367 / Creative Commons

Eighty-five Catholic parishes in Connecticut merged or closed on Thursday, June 29, the result of a pastoral plan that was in the works at the Hartford Archdiocese for two years. 

Joanne C Sullivan/flickr creative commons

At the end of June, 26 Catholic churches in the state are set to close. Some will be sold, while others could be converted to youth centers, homeless shelters, or other types of facilities. In addition, 59 churches will merge with others as part of a restructuring plan recently announced by the Hartford Archdiocese.

Tony Webster / Creative Commons

In the last 50 years, Sunday mass attendance in the Archdiocese of Hartford has declined 70 percent, and the number of active priests is down 65 percent. So it’s not a surprise that the Archdiocese is closing down and merging churches across the state -- from 212 to 127. This hour, we talk about the local mergers with priests and parishioners. 

jomec.co / Flickr

Has the golden age of humanity passed? Can we, as a species, survive the next few centuries? As our climate warms, population grows, resources shrink, and means of self destruction become more deadly, these questions move from the realm of dystopian fiction to real world relevance.

Ruedi Hofmann

A photography and film event called PIVOTAL Hartford: Faces of Change opens Thursday in the lobby of The Bushnell Performing Arts Center. 

Faces of Ancient Europe / Flickr

In looking to our past, a curious trend appears. A vast amount of mankind's great accomplishments in art, music, science, technology and language seem to emerge from a relatively small number of cities:  Athens, Hangzhou, Florence, Rome, Calcutta, Vienna, and Silicon Valley-- just to name a few.

Shirley Buxton / Flickr

Tensions in America run deep. They exist between the right and the left, between the religious and the secular, and between the rich and the poor. And in recent years, tensions between the citizens at large and their elected officials -- which seem less responsive to the will of the people -- gave rise to a wave of populism like we've rarely seen before.

Peter Bienkowski

It’s 1975. Saigon has fallen to the North Vietnamese. The end of the war is the beginning of a global humanitarian crisis.

Fifteen years later, the poet Ocean Vuong and his refugee family arrive in Hartford. He is two years old. The first place they stay is in a hotel.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Many small towns in New England are eager to welcome refugees from the war in Syria, but that doesn’t seem likely under President Donald Trump’s shifting immigration policy.

St. Johnsbury Academy in Vermont has found a way around that -- they’re offering scholarships to refugees already living in the U.S.

Muslim immigrants have become an increasingly large part of the fabric of New England in recent years.

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

One nonprofit, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is encouraging American-Muslims across the U.S. to run for political office. The group, called Jetpac, will train potential candidates regardless of party affiliation with the goal of increasing civic engagement within Muslim communities.

marc thiele/flickr creative commons

Public health officials worldwide are calling on their governments to get tough on alcohol marketing. A special issue of the scientific journal Addiction, edited by a UConn professor, finds that alcohol marketing to young people has a direct link to early drinking. And social media also plays a crucial role. 

Emily Epstein / Flickr

The narrative goes like this: For decades, white America has increasingly been left behind. The nation's culture and politics have steadily shifted to favor minorities and immigrants over the hard working white folk struggling to stay afloat.

Alan Levine / flickr creative commons

"Accessibility" is a word that we maybe too quickly file away as having something to do with the disabled or something like that. But it's really about "designing all products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible by everyone, regardless of their age, ability, or status in life."

It's about seeing the world around us as for everyone, all at once.

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