The Daily

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A Connecticut man who spent more than 12 years in prison for a crime it was determined he did not commit has been awarded $4 million by the state.

Lawrence Miller Jr., who now lives in Branford, received the funds under a state law that established a mechanism to compensate those who file claims of wrongful incarceration and can validate their cases.

JD Lasica / Creative Commons

General Electric’s CEO said the company will decide in the fourth quarter of this year whether to move out of Connecticut.

Jeff Immelt spoke publicly for the first time about the possibility of the relocation in an interview on CNBC.


Deep underwater, about 150 miles off the coast of New England, lie majestic mountains and rock formations deeper than Arizona's Grand Canyon. The area is home too lots of marine life, and now, there's a new effort afoot to preserve that space. 

TANAKA Juuyoh / Creative Commons

Some annual flowers just knock your socks off with their beauty. I remember a few years ago wandering through a greenhouse at White Flower Farm and being bowled over by their display of tuberous begonias. The flowers were perfect in a rainbow of colors with single and double flower shapes and some were even fragrant.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Creative Commons

Federal regulators are halting a five-year study of the risk of cancer in communities around six U.S. nuclear plants and a nuclear fuel site, including two Connecticut nuclear plants.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The National Labor Relations Board has filed a complaint against the Hartford Symphony Orchestra for failing to come to the bargaining table to hammer out a new contract with the orchestra's musicians.

Wikimedia / Creative Commons

The state's top prosecutor wants the Connecticut Supreme Court to reconsider its recent landmark decision to completely eliminate the death penalty in the state. The Connecticut Law Tribune reports that Chief State's Attorney Kevin Kane has filed a motion for argument and motions to strike the 4-3 decision, which was handed down in August. / Creative Commons

The tribes that own Connecticut's two casinos are taking another step in their bid to open a third casino north of Hartford. 

The Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes hosted a signing ceremony Thursday at the State Capitol in Hartford to formalize their partnership. 

State of Connecticut

Connecticut’s Transportation Commissioner said that no decision has been made about how work will proceed on the I-84 viaduct in Hartford. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

When Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra began his early rhetorical push, he used a decent amount of "us versus them" talk.

Nate Gagnon / WNPR

At a rally on the steps of the state Capitol Wednesday, a huge crowd came out to support the musicians of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra who are being asked to take a huge pay cut next season. 

Peter Morenus / UConn

The University of Connecticut has broken ground for a new $95 million engineering and science building.

Gov. Dannel Malloy joined UConn president Susan Herbst and other dignitaries for the Wednesday ceremony at the site of the planned 118,000-square-foot building. It is designed to house laboratories for UConn's genomics, biomedical, chemical engineering, and cyber system research programs.

One Connecticut lawmaker is calling for a special session to repeal a new tax on corporations which he says is forcing General Electric out of the state. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Violet Thomas came out as a transgender woman three months before high school graduation in 2013. She found some respite in her guidance counselor’s office, but things went from bad to worse at home.

So Thomas left, and began moving from couch to couch among friends. But she stayed nowhere very long.

Rory Anderson / Quincy Jones Productions

The close teacher-to-pupil, father-to-son-like relationship that developed between the dying, nonagenarian trumpet great Clark Terry and his last protégé, the young, gifted blind pianist Justin Kauflin, was the highly moving, emotional core of director Alan Hicks’s excellent, award-winning documentary, "Keep On Keepin’ On."

Carl Safina

What, exactly, do animals think and feel? That's the question at the heart of a new book by Carl Safina, an ecologist who traveled to Kenya, the Pacific Northwest, and Yellowstone to research his latest work, Beyond Words.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Sen. Richard Blumenthal announced on Tuesday that he will support the Iran nuclear plan. Speaking in Hartford, he said, "Rejecting this agreement is fraught with unacceptable risk."

Edward / Creative Commons

As homicide rates in Hartford and other cities across the country spike, some are asking whether one high-profile shooting can breed another. 

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

You notice Pat Mackenzie on the field at Dodd Stadium in Norwich — not in the bottom of the first, as the Connecticut Tigers’ lead-off hitter. And maybe not in the top of the first, as their second baseman.

Before the game even starts, during the national anthem, his shaved-bald, hatless head catches your eye. Or maybe his mustache-free goatee does. But you do notice Pat Mackenzie, as the players line up and face the flag.

United States Air Force / Creative Commons

Since 1986, the United States has been granting visa waivers to citizens of countries it sees as trusted allies. Someone from France or Spain can, relatively easily, use a passport and visit for up to 90 days. There are 38 countries whose citizens do not require visas to enter the United States. 

But one key ally has been wait listed: Poland. And the Polish community is asking, “Why not us?” 

Adam Frenier / NEPR

Decades after General Electric stopped improperly disposing industrial chemicals into the Housatonic in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the 150-mile river remains contaminated, and the EPA continues to ban fishing. But one part of the river is getting a makeover.

White House

President Obama announced an executive order requiring paid sick leave for more than 300,000 employees of federal contractors Monday morning.

Trinity College /

The president of Trinity College has decided to eliminate a mandate to make all fraternities co-ed.

Laura Ouimette / Creative Commons

As Hartford voters prepare to pick their next mayor, there's another mayor whose name keeps coming up. Eddie Perez was convicted more than five years ago on corruption-related charges. Now, his case may soon get a hearing at the state's highest court. 

National Archives

Scientists are attempting to use submersibles to explore a sunken German U-boat seven miles off the Rhode Island coast.

They're streaming the attempts online as they work to learn more about how shipwrecks affect the environment. 

Cacophony has taken over Matt Kressy’s MIT class. But the noise is planned, and soon, he hopes, it will become music.

This week, Kressy has put MIT’s first-ever integrated design and management (IDM) students in a kind of boot camp. He wanted to immerse the engineers, designers and business school students in a project where they would have to work in concert.

University of Connecticut officials said a school investigation has confirmed a hazing incident last year in its women's ice hockey program.

The university issued a statement Thursday after WFSB-TV reported this week that a former player has filed a lawsuit in Rockville Superior Court alleging she was pressured to drink and wear sexually inappropriate clothing during what upperclassmen called "Rookie Night" last fall.

Creative Commons

More than 100 firefighters are suing the city of New Haven in federal court over lost wages.

The New Haven Register reports 174 current and former firefighters claim that the fire department failed to accurately calculate their regular rates for overtime compensation, which they said violates the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Creative Commons

ESPN said commentator Curt Schilling won't appear on the air for the next month in the wake of his anti-Muslim tweet.

ESPN said Thursday that Schilling won't be on telecasts for the rest of the regular season or the American League wild-card game on October 6.

R0Ng / Creative Commons

Stringent gun permit laws may contribute to a drop in the gun suicide rate, according to a new study by the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research. The study contrasted the gun policies and gun suicide rates in Connecticut and Missouri.