courts

Previously, on Serial ...

"All this time I thought the courts proved it was Adnan that killed her. I thought he was where he deserved to be. Now I'm not so sure."

That's an email from Asia McLean to host Sarah Koenig, as read on the very first episode of Serial, the podcast sensation produced by the creators of This American Life.

A Texas grand jury investigating Planned Parenthood took no action against the abortion provider, but it indicted two anti-abortion activists involved in making covert videos of the organization.

Yoichi R. Okamoto / Creative Commons

Back in the 1940s, the NAACP sent a young black lawyer named Thurgood Marshall to Bridgeport, Connecticut to defend a black chauffeur against his wealthy employer in a sensational sexual assault trial that grabbed newspaper headlines.

That story is the basis of a new film called "Marshall," which is just beginning production in Hollywood.

Photo Phiend via Flickr.com / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court has upheld a robbery conviction against a man who called for a mistrial because his mother told a juror outside court that a police officer had lied on the stand.

Jack via Flickr.com / Creative Commons

Four men who were wrongfully convicted in a New Haven shooting have been awarded a multimillion-dollar settlement under the state’s compensation statute.

The Supreme Court of the United States has decided to review a challenge to President Obama's executive actions on immigration.

As we've reported, back in November 2014, Obama announced plans to shield from deportation up to 5 million immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally. Even before his plans got off the ground, lower courts put them on hold.

Glenn Sapaden / Creative Commons

A former federal prosecutor in Connecticut has pleaded guilty to stealing more than $600,000 from the owner of a trash hauling company he once represented.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Which constitutional rights are more important than others?

That’s the question Judge Thomas Moukawsher is essentially asking lawyers to answer, as he hears arguments from the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding. The coalition claims the state has failed to provide an adequate education to all students.  

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in a landmark case that could potentially limit teachers’ unions from collecting fees from non-members. New Haven has joined an amicus brief filed in the case.

It's the showdown at the Supreme Court Corral on Monday for public employee unions and their opponents.

Union opponents are seeking to reverse a 1977 Supreme Court decision that allows public employee unions to collect so-called "fair share fees."

Twenty-three states authorize collecting these fees from those who don't join the union but benefit from a contract that covers them.

Ben W / Creative Commons

The Libertarian Party is suing the state of Connecticut in federal court, challenging laws regarding the rules for petitioning candidates to appear on the election ballot. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

On the surface of things, there would seem to be little connection among the following: two small daily newspapers in central Connecticut, the wealthy owner of a multinational casino and resort chain, the Chinese crime gangs known as triads, and the sale of the largest newspaper in Nevada to an undisclosed owner. But they do all fit together somehow

Howard County Library System / Creative Commons

An upcoming lawsuit is set to determine whether Connecticut should provide all students with access to preschool. 

One day after he was arrested on fraud charges, controversial drug executive Martin Shkreli has resigned his post as the leader of Turing Pharmaceuticals. Shkreli is currently free on bail.

Turing announced the change Friday, naming Ron Tilles, its current board chairman, as the interim chief executive officer.

"We wish to thank Martin for helping us build Turing Pharmaceuticals into the dynamic research focused company it is today, and wish him the best in his future endeavors," Tilles said in a statement about the move.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The off-the-air Back9Network allegedly didn't pay rent for things like video equipment and a robotic camera, according to a new lawsuit filed in state court. 

One day after jurors in the trial of Baltimore Police Officer William Porter announced they were deadlocked, the judge in the case has declared a mistrial. The jury couldn't reach a verdict on involuntary manslaughter and three other charges Porter faced over the death of Freddie Gray last April.

On the second day of deliberations in the trial of a Baltimore police officer who's accused of involuntary manslaughter and other charges in the death of Freddie Gray, the jury sent a note to the judge saying they're deadlocked.

Judge Barry G. Williams instructed the jurors to keep working toward a verdict after receiving that note Tuesday afternoon, reports NPR's Jennifer Ludden. The panel began its deliberations in the trial of Officer William Porter on Monday afternoon. They have adjourned their second session and will return to the jury room Wednesday morning.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A federal jury has convicted insurance executive Earl O’Garro on three counts of fraud after barely 90 minutes of deliberations, the U.S. Attorney’s office said Monday.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held by the Taliban for five years after he left his base in Afghanistan in 2009, could receive life in prison.

Overriding the recommended punishment by an Army officer, head of Army Forces Command Gen. Robert B. Abrams ordered that Bergdahl, now the subject of the Serial podcast, face a court-martial for desertion.

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Last week, the Supreme Court heard arguments on whether the University of Texas at Austin can consider race when deciding who can come to their school. It's the second time the high court will decide this case. But like the rest of the country, the court is having a hard time talking about race without shouting at each other. Justice Scalia is making what some say are racist comments.

Dominik Skya flickr.com/photos/dominiksyka-photography/ / Creative Commons

A Connecticut judge said police have been improperly using data from cell phones to track the location of suspects.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford City Treasurer Adam Cloud took the stand in the federal criminal trial of former insurance executive Earl O’Garro Wednesday. Afterwards, Cloud said he had been betrayed by his former friend and maligned by the media. 

Pepperidge Farm / Trader Joe's

Norwalk, Connecticut-based commercial bakery Pepperidge Farm, one of the most popular snack brands in the U.S., is being a "tough cookie" and taking the grocery chain Trader Joe's to court over a cookie that looks too much like their Milano brand. Pepperidge Farm has filed suit against the grocery chain for trademark infringement.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Failed insurance executive Earl O’Garro took hundreds of thousands of dollars from the city of Hartford as part of an effort to enrich himself and buy a million-dollar beachfront condo in the Dominican Republic, prosecutors alleged during the first day of O’Garro’s federal trial Tuesday.

The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected an appeal from gun owners who challenged a ban on semi-automatic assault rifles and large-capacity ammunition magazines.

Two justices — Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia — would have heard the case and struck down the ban.

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The Supreme Court has declined a review of the ability of cities and states to ban semiautomatic weapons and large-capacity magazines, leaving in place lower court rulings like those affecting Connecticut.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The federal criminal trial of a former insurance executive who brought unwanted attention to Hartford City Hall begins this week. 

Jimmy Emerson flickr.com/photos/auvet/ / Creative Commons

The Norwich courthouse is improving its security following the escape of a prisoner from the building last month.

Middletown, CT Police Dept.

A former Wesleyan University student has pleaded guilty to distributing drugs involved in a rash of overdoses on the campus of the Connecticut school earlier this year.

About seven months after Baltimore was rocked by a night of riots, the first police officer implicated in Freddie Gray's death is being put on trial.

As NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports, the case is being closely watched in the city, and residents believe that a lot is at stake.

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