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Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal says a recently filed federal lawsuit against President Donald Trump is important because the American people deserve to know that the president is putting the national interests before his own personal financial interests.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

A judge has temporarily halted the state’s plan to allow more minority students into Hartford-area magnet schools. The decision came after a three-day court hearing in the ongoing Sheff vs. O’Neill case.

Ksenia Andreeva / Creative Commons

Hartford is inching closer and closer to insolvency — at a time when Connecticut is facing a fiscal crisis of its own.

This hour, we talk about the B word. Without the state to lean on, could Hartford file for bankruptcy?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The long-running Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case heads back to court this week. 

Nine months ago, Joyce Chance left a refugee camp in Uganda where she had spent the last eleven years. Chance, who was born in Congo, boarded a plane with her two kids, and came to the United States.

A refugee resettlement agency in Concord, New Hampshire picked them up at the airport, and moved them into a one-room apartment.

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

The decades-long effort to desegregate Hartford schools and improve educational outcomes for its students is headed back to court. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez has lost his latest legal battle, as a state appellate court dismissed an appeal he brought before it, and he's now asking the state Supreme Court to intervene. 

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that President Trump's controversial travel ban should be kept on hold, maintaining a nationwide preliminary injunction that blocks key elements of the executive order from being enforced.

At a Seattle courtroom on Monday, in the latest battle in the legal war over President Trump's currently suspended travel ban, lawyers and judges pushed and pulled on the swirling questions over Trump's intentions and the legal limits on executive power.

A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments from lawyers for the U.S. government and the state of Hawaii over the executive order that would block travelers from six majority-Muslim countries.

The U.S. Supreme Court has once again declined to reinstate North Carolina's strict voter ID law, which was struck down last year after a court ruled it was intentionally designed to stop African-Americans from voting.

The nation's highest court refused to consider an appeal by North Carolina Republicans, NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

"Chief Justice John Roberts wrote that the court's refusal to consider an appeal did not signify an opinion on the merits of the case," Fessler says.

A Massachusetts judge has thrown out the murder conviction of Aaron Hernandez because the former NFL star died in prison before his appeal could be heard. The ruling comes nearly three weeks after Hernandez killed himself.

David DesRoches / WNPR

Officials at the Hartford office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement locked the front doors to the Abraham Ribicoff Federal Building on Main Street Tuesday, as activists staged what they called a civil disobedience action. The protesters are attempting to stop the deportation of a Derby man, originally from Guatemala, who's lived in the U.S. for 24 years. Eventually, Hartford Police arrested 19 of the protestors.

The city of Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America for damages under the Fair Housing Act, the Supreme Court says, allowing a lawsuit to continue that accuses the big banks of causing economic harm with discriminatory and predatory lending practices.

The 5-3 vote saw Chief Justice John Roberts form a majority with the court's more liberal justices. Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely seen as the court's "swing" justice, sided with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito. The court's newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, wasn't involved in the case.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

The newest member of the Supreme Court celebrated his swearing-in with a public ceremony in the White House Rose Garden Monday morning. Neil Gorsuch will cement the conservative 5-4 majority on the high court, delivering on a key campaign promise of President Trump.

"I've always heard that the most important thing that a president of the United States does is appoint people — hopefully great people like this appointment — to the United States Supreme Court," Trump said. "And I got it done in the first 100 days."

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