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Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held by the Taliban after leaving his base in Afghanistan in 2009, has pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. Bergdahl was freed in 2014 in exchange for five Taliban detainees.

Bergdahl, a native of Idaho, pleaded guilty before the military judge in the case, Army Col. Jeffery R. Nance, at a hearing at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Monday, according to The Associated Press.

Yoichi Robert Okamoto / Creative Commons

The film “Marshall” opens in theaters nationwide on Friday. The screenplay was written by Connecticut attorney Michael Koskoff and his son Jacob.

John Phelan / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court heard arguments on Thursday in a landmark school funding lawsuit. State officials are appealing a lower court decision, that ruled the state's funding system was unconstitutional.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Not long after the state Supreme Court tossed his original felony convictions and ordered two new trials in 2016, former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez started getting a city pension worth $2,328.76 a month

A judge has acquitted former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith in late 2011. The verdict over Smith's killing has been highly anticipated — and it prompted protests outside the courthouse.

Here's an overview of the case from St. Louis Public Radio:

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Edith Windsor loved Thea Spyer. For nearly half a century, the two were partners and eventually were legally married as well. When Spyer died in 2009, though, the federal government didn't recognize that love on Windsor's tax forms, expecting her to pay more than $350,000 in estate taxes.

FBI / Wikimedia Commons

The FBI still doesn’t know what happened to $500 million dollars worth of  paintings stolen from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990.

The U.S. Army / Creative Commons

The White House has issued a memo that bans transgender people from enlisting in the military.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim wants to get public money for his campaign for governor, but the state told him no. That’s because of his past public corruption convictions.

Philip Kirby says he first used heroin during a stint in a halfway house a few years ago, when he was 21 years old. He quickly formed a habit.

"You can't really dabble in it," he says.

Late last year, Kirby was driving with drugs and a syringe in his car when he got pulled over. He went to jail for a few months on a separate charge before entering a drug court program in Hamilton County, Ind., north of Indianapolis. But before Kirby started, he says the court pressured him to get a shot of a drug called Vivitrol.

Nury Chavarria, the Connecticut mother who sought sanctuary from deportation at Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven, can return home to her four U.S.-born children. An immigration court in Hartford granted Chavarria motion for an emergency stay on Wednesday.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

NIAID / Creative Commons

It’s mosquito season and the Zika virus still remains a threat in many parts of the world — including here in the U.S.

This hour, we hear the latest on efforts to develop a Zika vaccine and we find out what researchers have learned since last summer about how the virus causes microcephaly in newborns. 

JJ flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/ / Creative Commons

Bridgeport police have settled a lawsuit brought by a man who was stopped, searched, and ticketed as he drove his boys home from little league and pizza two years ago.  

A coalition of Connecticut cities and towns are looking into suing pharmaceutical companies to hold them liable for their costs in responding to the opioid crisis.

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