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Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal judge in Bridgeport has ruled that the Trump administration violated the constitutional rights of two Central American migrant children when federal authorities took them at the Texas border and sent them to Connecticut without their parents. 

With the balance of the Supreme Court in question, some abortion-rights advocates are quietly preparing for a future they hope never to see — one without the protections of Roe v. Wade.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling struck a blow to public sector unions. But some union leaders say they’re hopeful the blowback may actually strengthen their organizations.

Protesters rallied outside the federal courthouse in New Haven against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
Jesus Garzon / Connecticut Public Radio

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court has received mixed reaction at his alma mater. Yale Law School released a statement Monday, with praise from current Yale professors and administrators.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy wasted no time lambasting Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's immediately controversial U.S. Supreme Court nominee.

Updated at 9:28 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Trump's choice would solidify the high court's conservative majority and continue the president's push to shift the federal bench to the right.

Trump announced his choice with a prime-time address from the White House East Room.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal speaking to reporters in Hartford on November 13, 2017.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Monday, President Trump is expected announce his choice to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

KatarzynaBialasiewicz/iStock / Thinkstock

This hour, we give an overview of the NAACP's newly-announced prison gerrymandering lawsuit against Connecticut. Why did the organization choose to target our state? And why now?

Plus, a breakdown of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in the case of Janus v. AFSCME. What does the justices’ decision mean for the future of Connecticut’s public-sector unions?

But first, the timeline for legal recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts remains a bit... hazy. We get the latest on the Bay State’s budding industry and find out what lies ahead for pot retailers. 

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

The recent retirement announcement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy has sparked questions about the future of abortion rights. During his tenure, Kennedy voted to uphold abortion rights in several cases. Now agencies like New Haven’s Planned Parenthood of Southern New England are worried that the Trump administration will seek to appoint a justice who will overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, the ruling that established a woman’s constitutional right to abortion.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut union organizers say they’ll persevere in the face of a stinging defeat at the Supreme Court.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Both Connecticut’s U.S. senators are urging Democrats to resist the appointment of a new Supreme Court justice until after November’s elections.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, setting the stage for what promises to be an epic political battle over his replacement.

A Trump nominee is likely to be far more conservative than Kennedy, who, though appointed by President Ronald Reagan, voted with the court's liberals in some key cases.

Updated at 10:50 a.m. ET

In a blow to organized labor, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers who choose not to join a union cannot be charged for the cost of collective bargaining.

The vote was a predictable 5-4. Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion with the court's conservatives joining him.

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court decision to uphold President Trump's travel ban on five Muslim-majority countries as well as Venezuela and North Korea, is drawing criticism from Democratic lawmakers, the American Civil Liberties Union, and many Muslim groups.

Updated at 11:26 a.m.

The U.S. Supreme Court has reversed a lower court decision upholding a California law requiring anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to more fully disclose what they are.

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