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Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

This Memorial Day weekend, Connecticut residents will flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches.

Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, University of Virginia professor and Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast. 

In a stunning reversal, the Connecticut Supreme Court on Friday vacated Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel's murder conviction and ordered a new trial in connection with the 1975 killing of his 15-year-old neighbor, Martha Moxley, in Greenwich.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This week's Nose tackles Kanye's bromance with President Trump. And we've got an update on monkey selfies!

Plus: Courtney Balaker's Little Pink House, which opens today at Real Art Ways in Hartford, tells the story of Kelo v. City of New London. Catherine Keener plays Susette Kelo. There's an unnamed version of Governor John Rowland. Keith Kountz makes an appearance. The movie is kind of Erin Brockovich, but on the Connecticut Shoreline in the Late '90s/Early 2000s. The Nose has seen it.

Susan Bysiewicz
Chion Wolf

What moves do you make to break out of the pack in what's been a governor's race without any indisputable front-runners? If you're Susan Bysiewicz, you call out wealthy, largely self-funding fellow Democratic rival Ned Lamont for not participating in the state's public campaign finance system, which restricts candidate spending.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

A new movie revisits the battle behind Kelo v. City of New London. We’ll take a look back at this eminent domain case that unfolded right here in Connecticut.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

The FBI arrested actor and comedian T.J. Miller Monday night, roughly three weeks after he allegedly called in a false bomb threat from an Amtrak train traveling into Connecticut.

Governor Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

A little over a week after his first pick for chief justice of the state Supreme Court was turned down by the state senate, Governor Dannel Malloy announced his new choice Thursday.

Joe Gratz / flickr creative commons

For an ASL-interpreted version click here

Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been identified as victims of wrongful convictions in the U.S. In 2015 and 2016, the wrongfully convicted were exonerated at a rate of about three per week.

This hour, a look at the reality of, psychology behind, and institutionalized pressures toward wrongful convictions in America.

The U.S. Supreme Court has again stepped into the bitter public turmoil over police shootings of civilians, ruling Monday that an Arizona police officer is shielded from being sued for shooting a woman in her own front yard.

The court said the officer acted reasonably, given that the woman, Amy Hughes, was carrying a large kitchen knife, that she was standing within striking distance of a woman who the officer did not know was Hughes' roommate, and that Hughes failed to drop the knife when ordered to do so.

Updated at 11:11 a.m. ET

Noor Salman, widow of the gunman who opened fire on an Orlando nightclub in 2016, has been found not guilty on both the counts she faced. U.S. District Judge Paul Byron announced the verdict Friday, roughly one month after the trial opened.

Updated at 8:16 p.m. ET

Maryland's second-highest court has ruled that Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction served as a subject for the hit podcast Serial, deserves a new trial. The decision issued Thursday by the Court of Special Appeals upheld a lower-court ruling that Syed's counsel in his original murder trial was deficient and ineffective.

John Phelan / Creative Commons

A day after the State Senate blocked the nomination of Andrew McDonald as Connecticut's next chief justice, Senate Democrats are hoping a for procedural do over. Democratic Senate President Martin Looney is calling for one of the 19 senators who voted against McDonald's nomination to file a motion to reconsider. 

John Phelan / Creative Commons

Robocalls, rallies, even an offer by Governor Malloy to make a Republican his next pick to the state's Supreme Court couldn't prevent Andrew McDonald's chief justice nomination from going down in flames.

Office of Governor Dan Malloy / Flickr

The Connecticut state Senate has voted down the confirmation of Andrew McDonald to be the state’s next chief justice. It failed largely because of unified opposition from Republicans, who made up 18 of the 19 “no” votes.

CT-N

Connecticut Senate Republicans said they have the votes to block Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy’s nomination for chief justice of the state supreme court. But Malloy is still insisting that the senate hold a vote.

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