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Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim wants to get public money for his campaign for governor, but the state told him no. That’s because of his past public corruption convictions.

Philip Kirby says he first used heroin during a stint in a halfway house a few years ago, when he was 21 years old. He quickly formed a habit.

"You can't really dabble in it," he says.

Late last year, Kirby was driving with drugs and a syringe in his car when he got pulled over. He went to jail for a few months on a separate charge before entering a drug court program in Hamilton County, Ind., north of Indianapolis. But before Kirby started, he says the court pressured him to get a shot of a drug called Vivitrol.

Nury Chavarria, the Connecticut mother who sought sanctuary from deportation at Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven, can return home to her four U.S.-born children. An immigration court in Hartford granted Chavarria motion for an emergency stay on Wednesday.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

NIAID / Creative Commons

It’s mosquito season and the Zika virus still remains a threat in many parts of the world — including here in the U.S.

This hour, we hear the latest on efforts to develop a Zika vaccine and we find out what researchers have learned since last summer about how the virus causes microcephaly in newborns. 

JJ flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/ / Creative Commons

Bridgeport police have settled a lawsuit brought by a man who was stopped, searched, and ticketed as he drove his boys home from little league and pizza two years ago.  

A coalition of Connecticut cities and towns are looking into suing pharmaceutical companies to hold them liable for their costs in responding to the opioid crisis.

Remember Rhode Island’s disastrous deal with former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling? The state invested $75 million of taxpayer dollars in Schilling’s video game company 38 Studios and lost it all before a lawsuit clawed back most of the money. It was one of the worst financial decisions in Rhode Island history. Yet the company that served as the state’s financial adviser on the deal has continued doing business throughout the state.

Yale University is suing the state of Connecticut. The school wants to bypass state building code to make more of the restrooms at its law school gender-neutral.

The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal says a recently filed federal lawsuit against President Donald Trump is important because the American people deserve to know that the president is putting the national interests before his own personal financial interests.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

A judge has temporarily halted the state’s plan to allow more minority students into Hartford-area magnet schools. The decision came after a three-day court hearing in the ongoing Sheff vs. O’Neill case.

Ksenia Andreeva / Creative Commons

Hartford is inching closer and closer to insolvency — at a time when Connecticut is facing a fiscal crisis of its own.

This hour, we talk about the B word. Without the state to lean on, could Hartford file for bankruptcy?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The long-running Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case heads back to court this week. 

Nine months ago, Joyce Chance left a refugee camp in Uganda where she had spent the last eleven years. Chance, who was born in Congo, boarded a plane with her two kids, and came to the United States.

A refugee resettlement agency in Concord, New Hampshire picked them up at the airport, and moved them into a one-room apartment.

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