corruption

a5er el3angood / Flickr Creative Commons

Cheating can be found everywhere these days. Whether in school, sports, business, politics or taxes, cheating it seems, is as much a part of our culture as baseball or apple pie. But it's not just in our culture that cheating abounds. Around the world, the practice appears to be reaching epidemic levels.

(This post was last updated at 8:12 p.m. ET.)

Sen. Robert Menendez, a New Jersey Democrat, has been indicted on federal corruption charges.

The indictment alleges that Menendez abused his office to benefit Salomon Melgen, a Florida eye doctor who was the senator's friend and donor. Menendez has always maintained his innocence.

During a press conference in Newark, New Jersey, Menendez said he was "confident that at the end of the day, I will be vindicated."

Paul Bass / New Haven Independent

Former Connecticut Governor John Rowland was sentenced on Wednesday to 30 months in prison in a campaign fraud case. He was also fined $35,000.

Laura Ouimette / Creative Commons

Attorneys for former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez have filed their latest briefs to the state Supreme Court, continuing their effort to keep their client out of jail more than four years since his conviction on corruption-related charges.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

There's a new anti-corruption task force in Connecticut replete with billboards asking the public to report the corrupt. This hour, we explore the history of corruption and our complicated attitudes toward it. 

Ethan Stock / Creative Commons

In a perfect world, we wouldn’t worry whether our food and working conditions were safe, or whether government regulators were keeping track of these things for us -- but we don’t live in a perfect world.

In fact, there’s a sense that if you run a big company, and you’re responsible for something really bad happening, that you’ll probably skate away with a slap on the wrist while somebody else has to live with the damage done.

U.S. Attorney CT / Twitter

Law enforcement officials are turning to billboards to root out corruption in Connecticut.

Billboards promoting the work of the Connecticut Public Corruption Task Force have popped up outside Bridgeport, Hartford, and Waterbury.

Mayors in those three cities have been convicted over the past decade or more on corruption and other charges, though convictions against Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez were overturned, and the case is now before the state Supreme Court. 

The speaker of the New York state Assembly plans to temporarily cede power to a small group of top lawmakers as he fights federal corruption charges.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A Connecticut businessman who admitted conspiring to hide payments from his wife's congressional campaign to former Connecticut Governor John Rowland has been sentenced to three years' probation, including three months in a halfway house. 

The U.S. Justice Department has announced a settlement with French company Alstom that marks the largest-ever criminal fine levied in the U.S. over foreign bribery laws. Some of the conspiracy took place in Connecticut. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Prosecutors in former governor John Rowland’s corruption case are again asking the judge to award a sentence of around four years. 

Mark Pazniokas / The Connecticut Mirror

Federal prosecutors are recommending that former Connecticut Governor John Rowland spend more than three years in prison on his latest criminal conviction. 

Three of Rhode Island's top former federal prosecutors staged a news conference Tuesday to discuss Providence mayoral candidate Buddy Cianci's criminal record and their concerns about his latest attempt to win back control of City Hall.

Wynn Resorts Holdings, LLC

Three men who own land in Everett, Massachusetts that is planned for a Wynn Resorts casino have been indicted on state and federal charges of fraud and corruption, according to reports. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Former Connecticut Governor John Rowland's state pension of nearly $53,000 a year will not be affected by his second felony conviction. 

The trial that led to the conviction of former Connecticut Governor John Rowland is having repercussions on this year's 5th Congressional District race, the same seat at the center of Rowland's case.

Photo by Jeff Cohen

After less than a full day of deliberation, a federal jury squarely laid the blame on former Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland for two attempted conspiracies involving concealment of payments to him in connection with election work for congressional candidates.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Former Connecticut Governor John Rowland has been found guilty on all seven counts in his federal conspiracy trial. The announcement was made shortly after 2:30 pm on Friday.

Federal prosecutors charged Rowland earlier this year in a seven-count indictment because of what they described as “his efforts to conceal the extent of his involvement in two federal election campaigns.”

Mark Pazniokas / The Connecticut Mirror

Closing arguments ended on Thursday afternoon in the federal criminal trial of former Connecticut Governor John Rowland, and now the case is in the hands of the jury.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Former Connecticut Governor John Rowland has told the court that he will not testify in the federal criminal trial against him, and the defense has rested its case.

That happened Wednesday morning, but not before more heated argument. Prosecutors allege that Rowland took part in an off-the-books scheme to get paid for work on the 2012 congressional campaign of Republican Lisa Wilson-Foley. They say he did work on the campaign, but he was paid by Wilson-Foley’s husband, Brian Foley, and his nursing home company, Apple Rehab.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The trial of former Connecticut Governor John Rowland starts to wind down. The race for governor is ramping up and the underticket races continue to slip under the radar. The Wheelhouse continues to roll even without our host John Dankosky this week.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of the main questions for the jury in the case of former Governor John Rowland is this: was his consulting contract with a nursing home business the real deal, or was it a “pretext” designed to funnel him money for work on a 2012 congressional campaign?

Mark Pazniokas / The Connecticut Mirror

The prosecution has rested its case in the federal campaign corruption trial of former Connecticut Governor John Rowland.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The attorney for former Governor John Rowland took aim at his chief accuser in court Tuesday morning, trying to establish the idea that Rowland was unaware of any scheme to hide payment for his campaign work.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Brian Foley, the husband of a 2012 Republican congressional candidate, told jurors that he wanted to hire former Connecticut Governor John Rowland for campaign services, but the risk of hiring a convicted felon posed a big political hurdle.

Mark Pazniokas / The Connecticut Mirror

The fourth day of former Connecticut Governor John Rowland’s corruption trial gets underway on Monday in federal court in New Haven. 

Prosecutors charge that Rowland allegedly devised ways to work for two political campaigns by drafting sham contracts with businesses owned by the candidates to serve as cover. Rowland has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy, falsifying records, and other charges.

Now that Virginia GOP Gov. Bob McDonnell has been found guilty of corruption, fraud and bribery, his name could be added to a long list of top state officials who have had to take the walk from the statehouse to the big house.

Updated at 3:38 p.m. ET

A federal jury in Richmond, Va., has found former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell guilty on 11 of 14 charges in his corruption trial. His wife, Maureen, was found guilty on nine of 14 charges, including obstruction of justice.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

As the country looks back on the 40th anniversary of the Watergate scandal, we’ll revisit a conversation with former Nixon White House Counsel John Dean. He was credited with cooperating with investigators, and linking President Nixon to the Watergate scandal. He was also called, by the FBI, the “master manipulator of the cover up.”

Tonynetone / Creative Commons

It's been 40 years since former President Richard Nixon resigned the presidency over Watergate. But, the story of Watergate is almost impossible to tell. It's too big and too murky. It's full of files that were burned and a tape that was erased. It's full of characters named McCord and Magruder and Mitchell, who are hard to keep track of. With each passing year, it becomes more of an inert thing and less of a breathing, wriggling, writhing creature.  

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