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A prominent physicians group in Connecticut and health insurer Anthem face a deadline this week to reach an agreement to keep the doctors within the insurer’s network. The brinksmanship of this particular face-off is attracting the attention of lawmakers. 

Patrick Skahill

Patients and caregivers seeking the opioid-reversal drug naloxone can now get the medication without a doctor’s prescription. That’s thanks to a state law that went into effect one year ago allowing pharmacists to prescribe and dispense the drug. 

It has been a common belief that low-emissions vehicles, like hybrids and electric cars, are more expensive than other choices. But a new study finds that when operating and maintenance costs are included in a vehicle's price, cleaner cars may actually be a better bet.

The cars and trucks we drive are responsible for about a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions in this country. That's why Jessika Trancik, an energy scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, decided it was time to take a closer look at vehicle emissions.

The carcinogen often referred to as the "Erin Brockovich chemical" is present in about two-thirds of the drinking water across the country, according to water testing data from the Environmental Protection Agency.


This Saturday, more than 1,300 museums across the country will offer free admission as part of Smithsonian magazine's annual Museum Day Live!

When you shop for cleaning supplies, brightly colored bottles advertise stain-removing powers or "whiter whites." But it’s hard to get clear information about what the chemical ingredients could do to your health or the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency is hoping to change that.

If you're like me, somewhere in your house you imagine there must be a pile of lost white iPhone earbuds. The pile is probably right next to the stack of single socks. It's one of several reasons I never liked wireless Bluetooth headphones. They're smaller and even easier to lose.

Mary Anne Williams

Your home is one of your biggest investments, but some Connecticut residents are seeing that investment crumble because of failing foundations. This hour, we find out what the state is doing to help those whose homes and futures are -- quite literally -- falling apart beneath them. 

Alex Prolmos / Flickr Creative Commons


The U.S. Justice Department recently filed two lawsuits to block mega-mergers that would reduce the number of the nation’s largest health insurance companies from five to three.

The larger of the two multi-billion dollar mergers is a takeover of Connecticut-based Cigna by Indiana-based Anthem.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

Connecticut-based health insurer Aetna is calling off its public insurance exchange expansion plans for next year as it becomes the latest big insurer to cast doubt on the future of a key element of the Affordable Care Act.

Maudib/iStock / Thinkstock

Connecticut's Department of Insurance is holding public hearings this week on double-digit rate increases requested by the state's health insurers for the 2017 coverage year.

The increases would affect more than 100,000 residents insured by three companies.

Fuse / Thinkstock

Single-family home sales in Connecticut rose a bit over four percent in June, according to the latest report from The Warren Group, a banking and real estate trade publisher.

President Obama is expected to sign a federal GMO labeling bill into law soon. This would nullify Vermont's labeling law, as well as laws passed by Connecticut and Maine that have not been enacted yet — effective immediately.

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

Connecticut Insurance Commissioner Katharine Wade contended she has no conflict of interest that would prevent her from overseeing a proposed merger between Anthem and Bloomfield-based Cigna.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

The Department of Justice is reportedly preparing to block two large insurance industry mergers that involve Connecticut-based companies Aetna and Cigna.

Citing "a culture of deeply-rooted corporate arrogance," New York, Massachusetts and Maryland have filed civil lawsuits against Volkswagen, accusing the automaker of violating those states' environmental laws when it sold cars under the "clean diesel" label that were actually rigged to trick emissions tests.

Mary Anne Williams

Your home is one of your biggest investments, but some Connecticut residents are seeing that investment crumble because of failing foundations. This hour, we find out what the state is doing to help those whose homes and futures are -- quite literally -- falling apart beneath them. 

It's only been out a week, but Pokémon Go is making more money than a Meowth using Pay Day.

After years of bitter debate and legislative stalemate over the labeling of genetically modified ingredients, a compromise proposal sailed through Congress in breathtaking speed over the past three weeks.

The House of Representative passed the measure on Thursday with solid support from both Democrats and Republicans. It now goes to the White House, where President Obama is expected to sign it.

For American consumers there's a bit of economic silver-lining in the United Kingdom's vote to exit the European Union last month: Lower mortgage rates.

In the week after Brexit, the interest rate on 30-year fixed mortgages fell to their lowest levels in more than 3 years. And that spurred a boom in mortgage applications that, experts expect, will continue.

Spencer Cullen is a loan originator for CRM Lending in Tysons Corner, Va. Since the Brexit vote, he's seen business increase 60 percent to 70 percent.

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday took the first step to pass legislation that would overturn Vermont's law that requires the labeling of food that contains genetically modified ingredients. The proposed federal bill would prohibit individual states from enacting their own GMO labeling standards.

MILKADEAL / flickr creative commons

The Thighmaster, the Chop-O-Matic, the George Foreman Grill and the Clapper: Products which are all part of American consumer culture and which were all introduced through infomercials. But as online shopping increases and traditional television watching decreases, are we beginning to see the end of these high-energy, late-night shows?

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

Controversy is growing around state Insurance Commissioner Katharine Wade. She's in charge of reviewing a $54 billion health insurance merger between Anthem and Cigna, but she's also a former employee of one of the companies in question. Should she recuse herself from the case? And what has been the role in all this of Governor Dannel Malloy, who appointed Wade last year? This hour, we take a closer look with a panel of local and national reporters. 

The Federal Aviation Administration issued the first operational rules to govern the commercial use of drones on Tuesday.

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said this was a "huge step for innovation."

The 600-plus pages of new regulations require drone operators to pass a written exam every two years, keep the unmanned aircraft within sight and avoid flying it over people and at night. The rules also require drones to stay at least 5 miles from airports.

Ned Gerard / AP

A state judge in Bridgeport, Connecticut heard arguments on Monday about whether a lawsuit against a gun manufacturer has legal merit to move forward.