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Connecticut legislature

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Connecticut lawmakers are getting public input on several possible changes to state liquor laws.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut lawmakers met with Department of Motor Vehicles officials on Friday after a year of backlogs, long lines, and other problems developed following a major computer overhaul at the state agency. 

Connecticut Senate Democrats

After five terms in the state senate, Andrew Maynard announced he will not seek re-election. The Democrat from Stonington is recovering from two head injuries in the last two years and questions have been raised about his ability to serve.

Steve Petteway / Creative Commons

The political ramifications of Antonin Scalia's death became immediately apparent on Saturday. President Barack Obama said he will make his Supreme Court appointment and Senate Republicans said they will block confirmation. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse considers this political puzzle in Washington. Meanwhile, lawmakers in Hartford are working on what has become their annual puzzle: the state budget.

Connecticut Senate Republicans / Creative Commons

Advocates are urging Connecticut lawmakers not to allow the governor to move to a system of block grants to government agencies. They worry this new way of dealing with the budget might eliminate public hearings.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

Lawmakers are considering a bill that would limit the use of seclusion and restraints to individuals aged 20 or older at facilities run by the Departments of Correction and Children and Families.

Governor Dannel Malloy wants to restart bipartisan budget talks with Connecticut legislative leaders.

The Democrat has said Connecticut must change its way make the state's budget more predictable and sustainable.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Residents who need help paying for child care can apply for state assistance but homeless families often don't meet the guidelines to be eligible for the program.

Paul Gionfriddo

For former state lawmaker Paul Gionfriddo, mental health isn’t just a matter of policy -- it's also personal. His son, now 30, has schizophrenia. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

More trains! Wider roads! Fixed bridges! The governor’s big plan to fix our transportation system has a lot in it but the state is still figuring out how to pay for it. Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker stops by for an update on the state of Connecticut’s current transportation infrastructure and plans to overhaul the system.

Paul Gionfriddo

Paul Gionfriddo leads Mental Health America but he has deep roots in Connecticut. He’s a former state representative and mayor of Middletown who now advocates for people with mental illness. During his time in the legislature, he worked on laws and policies that contributed to the nation's current mental health crisis. His book Losing Tim explores his own son’s struggle with schizophrenia and the mental health system that failed him.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dan Malloy delivers his "State of the State" address Wednesday as the legislature reconvenes for this year's regular session. The state budget deficit looms large over the capitol and deep cuts throughout government are expected. The session also starts in the wake of high-profile corporations testing the waters of relocation to other states.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

State Comptroller Kevin Lembo is projecting a $7.1 million budget deficit in the current $20 billion fiscal year budget and warning that state revenues may continue to erode.

Tomorrow the Connecticut General Assembly will begin the 2016 legislative session. Lawmakers are facing some tough issues this year. The state budget has a big gap that needs to be closed. There’s the lockbox to protect funding for transportation projects. And GE is taking its headquarters out of Fairfield and relocating to Boston which will be a big hit to the state’s coffers. Susan Haigh, Capitol reporter for the Associated Press, joins us from the AP offices in Hartford to give us a preview of some of the top issues lawmakers will take on this year.

CT Senate Democrats/Creative Commons

Should Connecticut require paid family and medical leave? The state Department of Labor will report back to lawmakers this legislative session on how the state could implement the proposed law. 

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