WNPR

Connecticut legislature

Reporter Roundtable

Jan 19, 2012
Chion Wolf

Senator Ed Meyer introduced a bill on Tuesday to repeal the death penalty in Connecticut. He says the future of capital punishment in the state may depend on two key lawmakers.

Last year – just as Connecticut was poised to repeal the death penalty, and as jury selection was underway in the Cheshire triple murder case  -  Senator Ed Meyer received a phone call from his son. 

School superintendents say the public education system in Connecticut needs an overhaul. The superintendents have unveiled a bold plan to transform schooling in the state.

It's not enough anymore to give kids an opportunity to learn, says Joseph Cirasuolo, executive director of the CT Association of Public School Superintendents. He says schools have to insure that all kids achieve at high levels.

Two major bills aimed at boosting job creation in Connecticut have passed the legislature in a special session. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Lawmakers Wednesday approved a $626 million effort to revamp Connecticut’s economic development strategy. Among other measures the jobs bill contains a grant and loan program for small businesses, plans to streamline state regulation, new approaches to workforce development and tax credits for hiring the long-term unemployed. House Majority leader Brendan Sharkey.

Chion Wolf

The state legislature is calling a special session tomorrow. It’s a tale of two bills: Jobs and Jackson Labs.

Governor Malloy has unveiled a jobs plan.  It’s focused on small business growth, startup investments for innovative firms, and streamlining the process for business to get things done.  
These are all ideas that the governor and legislative leaders expect to get some level of bi-partisan support.

NationalAtlas.gov

Every ten years, the U.S. Census is taken and every ten years, the legislative map is redrawn. In states like Connecticut - that process is handled by a legislative committee - an arrangement that leads many to wonder about whether politics plays too large a role in who we get to vote for.

As ProPublica reporters have been uncovering, corporations, unions and other special interests have gotten heavily involved in redrawing district lines.

Chion Wolf

Every ten years, a bipartisan committee made up of members of Connecticut's General Assembly go through the tedious process of redrawing legislative and congressional maps. Often the Reapportionment committee's work breaks down into partisan politics. Earlier this week, the Reapportionment committee wrote a letter to Governor Dannel Malloy acknowledging that they will miss their September 15th deadline, which is today. Joining us by phone is House Minority leader and co-chair of the Reapportionment committee Lawrence Cafero.

Photo by Kevin Briody (Flickr)

A recent rash of accidents involving elderly drivers in Connecticut has state lawmakers, law enforcement and senior advocates again looking at the tricky issues that concern senior drivers.

Joining us by phone is Jennifer Millea, she is the Communications Director for AARP - Connecticut.

"Model Workplaces" in Connecticut Not Always Safest

Jul 25, 2011
All rights reserved by LetMeTakeYourFotograf

In February 2007, David Gootkin came to the state Capitol in Hartford to testify in favor a bill prompted by his brother Robert’s death the year before at Covanta’s waste-to-energy plant in Wallingford. The bill, which eventually was adopted, requires that operators of solid waste facilities have at least two employees or a camera in the work area when waste is being fed into a hopper.

Chion Wolf

At the end of a slightly confusing night, the state legislature gave Gov. Dannel P. Malloy some of the added emergency budget-cutting authority he wanted but made him unhappy by spurning his request to cut aid to cities and towns. 

Chion Wolf

OK, I know this might not be as easy and fun as yesterday's show on comic books, but if the current state budget were a comic book, it would be about a dystopian future. (And present for that matter ...)

The state constitution requires that the budget be balanced by Friday. It isn't. The plan for doing that included significant givebacks by the state employees. They wouldn't do it.

Chion Wolf

Hartford is at a time of transition. Recovering from corruption, transforming its education planning for the future.

Today, Where We Live teams up with The Hartford Public Library for “The Year Ahead: A Conversation with Hartford’s State Legislators.” 

We'll be talking with members of the state congressional delegation from the city. They'll share their thoughts about the state of Hartford, and what lawmakers are doing to solve some of the city’s problems - from violence, to education scores, to literacy rates.

woodleywonderworks, Flickr Creative Commons

Though education advocates are expressing frustration at an overall lack of progress during this legislative session, there’s one area where people are feeling cautiously optimistic. A bill focusing on early childhood education could help tackle the state’s stubborn achievement gap, and may better position Connecticut for future federal funding.

House And Senate Approve Huge Energy Bill

Jun 8, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, piitaya

The House and Senate have passed a large energy bill designed to create a new Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.  WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the Governor is expected to sign it.

Malloy Is Hurtling Through Time and Space

May 31, 2011
Chion Wolf

The question asked by an exasperated state legislator at an informational hearing last week was the one posed frequently, if not publicly, at the state Capitol about Connecticut's always-in-a-hurry governor: "Why can't this wait?" The query, by Rep. Roberta Willis, D-Salisbury, concerned Gov. Dannel P. Malloy's fast-track plan to remake the UConn Health Center, but it could have applied to any major initiative, beginning with the budget.

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