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Congress

(I)NTERVIEW - Chris Shays

Jul 31, 2012
CPBN Media Lab

Christopher Shays is a former U.S. Congressman from Connecticut’s 4th district. He is looking to return to Congress, this time as a U.S. Senator. Shays was a member of the Peace Corps from 1968 to 1970. It was during his time with the corps in Fiji that he met his future wife, Betsi. In 1974, Shays was elected to Connecticut’s House of Representatives. He spent thirteen years in this office. He won a special election in 1987 for a the vacant seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

(I)NTERVIEW - Susan Bysiewicz

Jul 31, 2012

Former Connecticut Secretary of State Susan Bysiewicz is looking to become Connecticut’s next United States Senator. From her humble beginnings on a farm in Middletown, Bysiewicz dedicated herself throughout her years of study and has earned several impressive law degrees. After completing her undergraduate education at Yale University, Bysiewicz continued on to Duke University’s School of Law.

Congressional Delegation Reacts to SCOTUS Ruling

Jun 29, 2012
Marty Stone (Flickr Creative Commons)

The Supreme Court’s validation of the health care law did nothing to end the bitter debate in Congress over the Affordable Care Act. In fact, the decision may have hardened positions.

Chion Wolf

Republican congressional candidate Justin Bernier is casting himself as the conservative alternative to Andrew Roraback in Connecticut's 5th Congressional District race. Bernier described the 5th as a "right-of-center district, no doubt about it."

During an appearance on WNPR's Where We Live, Bernier weighed in on the Citizens United Supreme Court decision. "I support Citizens United," said Bernier. "I think that what they're doing is good in terms of getting Republicans elected."

Kreg Steppe (Flickr Creative Commons)

There's been a lot of talk and some political movement toward a national standard for the use of clean energy. But the topic is still rife with politics. Researchers at Yale and Harvard have released a study that says Americans on average would be willing to pay $162 per year in higher electricity bills to fund a national standard requiring that 80% of energy be "clean." 

But "clean" has different meanings for different people.

Chion Wolf

Republican State Senator Andrew Roraback is leaving the legislature to run for the 5th Congressional seat being vacated by U.S. Senate candidate Chris Murphy.

Photo by Chion Wolf

Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro is reacting strongly against a decision by the House Agriculture Committee to cut $33 billion over 10 years from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program known as SNAP.

46 million Americans rely on the food stamp program. A majority of them live in households with incomes below the poverty line.

The Buffett Rule Splits Connecticut Senators

Apr 17, 2012
Fortune Live Media (Flickr Creative Commons)

On the eve of today’s deadline for filing state and federal taxes, Connecticut’s Senators split over raising taxes on the richest Americans.

The so-called Buffett Rule would make all Americans earning more than $1 million pay a 30 percent tax rate on their investment income. Named after billionaire Warren Buffett , who doesn’t like paying a higher tax rate than his secretary, the rule failed on a procedural vote Monday in the Senate. 

Chion Wolf

I don't look forward to political debates. There are too many of them. They reveal far too little. And nothing interesting ever happens.

Except last night. Five Democratic hopefuls seeking the US Senate nomination debated under the auspices of WVIT or ... NBC30 ... or whatever we're supposed to call it.

Present was one candidate I had absolutely never heard of, Matthew Oakes, a big guy who tends to choke up when talking about high education and other wonky topics.

Chion Wolf

Baseball season puts us in mind of those great baseball names --  Van Lingle Mungo, Prince Fielder, Napoleon Lajoie, Nestor Chylack, Rabbit Maranville and Lancelot Phelps.

Actually ... Lancelot Phelps wasn't a baseball player. He was the first person elected to Congress from Connecticut's Fifth District. And since that time, the frequently redistricted Fifth  has elected Connecticut's only African-American member of Congress - Gary Franks - and a fellow named John Rowland.

Photo by Chion Wolf

A 2004 law requires a certain percentage of federal contracting dollars to go to small businesses owned by service disabled veterans. But a recent inspector's report from the Department of Defense finds that in 2010, more than two dozen contracts were awarded to companies that weren't eligible.  

Connecticut education officials are finalizing the state’s waiver application for relief from the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Applications for the second round of waivers are due on Tuesday.

Flickr Creative Commons, BenLucier

It's hard to keep an even keel about the debate over the two Internet anti-piracy laws known as SOPA and PIPA.

Yesterday's spectacle, if it revealed nothing else, showed what a flimsy connection there is between a congressmen "co-sponsoring" a bill and that same congressmen knowing what's in the bill.

After yesterday's show of force,  a number of congressmen withdrew their support for their co-sponsorship because ... wait for it ... they didn't agree with the content of the bills.

Kevin Burkett (Flickr Creative Commons)

So, the “super committee” failed to reach a deficit-reduction plan - now, “automatic” cuts loom.

While this is undeniably true - the impact of the committee’s “failure” can be read many ways: One is that it actually helped to divert attention away from the debt ceiling battle in Congress until after the 2012 election.

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