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President Barack Obama visited Connecticut today where he spoke at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain. The President highlighted his plan to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. He was joined by Governor Dannel Malloy, along with the governors of Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont.

CCSU Students React to Obama's Visit, Message

Mar 6, 2014
Chion Wolf / WNPR

President Obama spoke Wednesday to a packed gymnasium at Central Connecticut State University. Several CCSU students talked with WNPR about the president's call for a hike in the minimum wage, and opportunity for all.

Standing outside the Detrick Gymnasium, student Anna Battey said she thought President Obama’s speech was brilliant. "I work at a teas shop," she said. "I work for minimum wage, so anything helps. I'm a college student, so anything helps."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has consistently dodged questions about whether he'll run for re-election in 2014. According to a new Quinnipiac University poll, if he does run, he'll have a race on his hands.

The General Assembly's Transportation Committee heard testimony today on a bill that would require the Department of Transportation to analyze the corrosive effects of chemical road treatments on vehicles and highway infrastructure. Connecticut Transportation Commissioner James Redeker said he'll review whether it makes sense to add rust inhibitors to the chemical road treatments.

Ariella Axelbank

  A la ronda, a new play opening this weekend at Wesleyan University, calls attention to Argentina's "Dirty War" and the human rights organization Madres de Plaza de Mayo.

During the so called "dirty war" of the late 70's and early 80's, tens of thousands of Argentineans were systematically abducted and killed, suspected of being an enemy of the military dictatorship.

Matthias Rosenkranz / Creative Commons

According to a report from an independent law firm, University of Connecticut officials knew of sexual abuse allegations against a music professor for a decade before taking action.

For those of you keeping track of the headlines detailing sexual assault and hazing at frat houses, it may come as no surprise that fraternities have a dark side. Caitlin Flanagan, a writer at The Atlantic, spent a year investigating Greek houses and discovered that "the dark power of fraternities" is not just a power over pledges and partygoers but one held over universities as well.

In 1984, it cost $10,000 a year to go to Duke University. Today, it's $60,000 a year. "It's staggering," says Duke freshman Max Duncan, "especially considering that's for four years."

But according to Jim Roberts, executive vice provost at Duke, that's actually a discount. "We're investing on average about $90,000 in the education of each student," he says. Roberts is not alone in making the claim. In fact, it's one most elite research institutions point to when asked about rising tuition.

Residents, businesses, state and local governments are preparing for another snow day. Up to 12 inches of heavy, wet snow is expected to fall. Officials with Connecticut Light and Power say the storm could threaten power lines as well as equipment. CL&P will activate its emergency response plan tomorrow morning and will have crews standing by across the state.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

State lawmakers heard from educators, students and advocates of sexual assault victims on Tuesday as they consider legislation to improve sexual assault policies on Connecticut's college campuses.

Some of the most dramatic testimony came from the mother of a UConn student, who described the frustration she had trying to find help for her daughter after she reported being sexually assaulted a fraternity party. 

Governor Dannel Malloy delivered his State of the State Address on Thursday. The governor talked about plans to improve education, help for veterans, and tax relief. He again called for the state to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2017. 

Diane Orson / WNPR

A recently-released report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office found that as college tuition costs soared between 2007 and 2012, demand for federal student loans increased more than 300 percent.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Lawmakers have drafted legislation to address sexual assault on college campuses. It will be the first bill heard by the Higher Education Committee when it convenes next month.

Brett Jordan / Creative Commons

Imagine a day without adjunct faculty. Many colleges and universities would effectively shut down.  Somewhere between 70-75% of the academic workforce in higher education is not tenured or on track for tenure. Most of those people fall into the category of adjunct. 

The Connecticut Department of Children and Families held a full-day forum on Wednesday about domestic minor sex trafficking. The aim was to raise awareness of the issue and to strengthen partnerships across the state to combat the victimization of children. Keynote speaker Audrey Morrissey shared her experience as a survivor of the commercial sex industry, and discussed her work teaching young girls how to avoid her fate.

Jupiterimages/Stockbyte / Thinkstock

The price of college textbooks has increased 82 percent over the past decade, according to a new study that looks at alternatives to the traditional college textbook.

Mr. Ush / Creative Commons

The 40th session of the Yale Model United Nations is underway in New Haven. Nearly 1,700 high school students from as far away as New Zealand have been immersing themselves in the Model U.N. experience, taking advantage of the plethora of speeches, classes and other activities happening this weekend. 

CCSU Case Continued; Flu Cases Climb

Jan 17, 2014
New Britain Police Department

A former Central Connecticut State University student who triggered a campus lockdown and massive response by the SWAT team was set to be arraigned today in New Britain Superior Court on breach of peace and trespassing charges.

David Kyem, 21, wore a costume with a mask and BB handgun on campus November 4. Officials locked down the school for three hours. His case was continued to February 27. 

WNPR/CPTV

Eighty-six current and former members of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity at Yale University are being sued over an accident at a Yale-Harvard football game in 2011. Nancy Berry, 30, of Salem, Massachusetts, was killed after being struck by a rental truck that was heading to the fraternity’s tailgating party outside the Yale Bowl. Lawyers for Barry’s family and another woman who was injured in the accident sued the fraternity members late last month. 

zimmytws/iStock / Thinkstock

It's been two years since the in-state tuition law went into effect. It benefits students without legal status who have graduated from a Connecticut high school. The young people who fought for the in-state tuition law for undocumented students are launching a new campaign. Their new goal is to help these students access financial aid.  

Young Poet's 'Shrinking Women' Goes Viral

Jan 14, 2014

[Youtube]

Lily Myers intended her poem “Shrinking Women” to be a personal one.

But a video of her recital at the 2013 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational was posted to the poetry website Button Poetry and to The Huffington Post, where it went viral.

With more than 3 million views, it continues to circulate across social media websites.

WNPR/CPTV

U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Charles Schumer said over the weekend they had been informed by the Federal Railroad Administration that it would begin procedures this year to establish a rule regarding installation of video cameras on trains.

The devices could be installed in train cars to record unsafe behavior by drivers. Outward-facing cameras would scan the tracks. The National Transportation Safety Board has been urging the railroad administration to increase the use of safety cameras for several years.

R.J. Reynolds

With mental health issues at the forefront of local and national discussion, the phrase "the mentally ill" has become commonplace in media headlines. But does it really belong there -- or anywhere, for that matter? We talk with Tufts Medical Center’s Psychiatrist-in-Chief about the importance of the words we use when talking about mental illness. 

John Walker / Flickr Creative Commons

The transition from high school to college is tough for anyone. But if you’re the first in your family to go to school, you’re a trailblazer and have a whole other set of challenges. From knowledge of the college application process, to financial aid, to campus life, there are more hurdles to get past when you’re the first to go through it.

On this episode of Where We Live we’re joined by a panel of first-generation college students, both past and present to share their stories. Are you a first-generation college student? We want to hear your story!

WNPR/CPTV

Governor Dannel Malloy announced an appointment Wednesday to a newly-created cabinet level position within his administration advocating on behalf of the state’s disability community.

Jonathan Slifka will be responsible for increasing outreach on behalf of the governor and executive branch agencies to people with disabilities, in order to provide policy and practical recommendations for advocacy and employment programs.

Ingram Publishing / Thinkstock

Post University is one of several private schools in the state that's seeing enrollment actually increasing. According to data from the state Office of Higher Education, the for-profit independent school saw enrollment grow by 10.5 percent this year. 

Courtesy of Chris Meisenkothen

An Italian organization representing victims of asbestos exposure has asked Yale University to rescind an honorary degree awarded to the owner of the company they once worked for.

The initial suspicion of many — that Monday's bomb scare at Harvard University was the work of a student who wanted to avoid taking a test — may have been correct.

Jessica C. Salley / The Harvard Crimson

Four buildings at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts were evacuated Monday after there were unconfirmed reports of the presence of explosives. Thayer, Emerson, and Sever Hall were cleared in the early afternoon, and campus police said students may return. The Science Center was cleared shortly before 3:00 pm. No explosives have been found yet, according to The Harvard Crimson.

Final exams in the affected buildings, which were to take place Monday morning, were postponed. Access to Harvard Yard was restricted to those with Harvard identification.

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