colleges

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Every year at this time, as you may have heard, there's a big-old basketball tournament that goes on. And every year at this time, people in offices and in firehouses and in Rotary Clubs and in Atlantic City enter bracket pools, where they try to win a big-old pile of ducats by predicting just exactly how said big-old basketball tournament will go.

We all know that American college education isn't cheap. But it turns out that it's even less cheap if you look at the numbers more closely.

That's what the Wisconsin HOPE Lab did. The lab, part of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, conducted four studies to figure out the true price of college.

To get a sense of student realities, researchers interviewed students on college campuses across the state of Wisconsin. But they also examined 6,604 colleges nationally and compared their costs with regional cost-of-living data from the government.

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Laura McKenna went looking for information on a medical condition that would help her care for her child. Unfortunately, she couldn't access most of the articles she located without paying as much as thirty-eight dollars for an eight-page report. She never read it.

Weeks after students staged a sit-in over allegations of racism on campus, Providence College has detailed plans to address the students' concerns. In a letter, college officials outlined proposed changes to faculty training and the college curriculum.

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Reuben Pierre-Louis was moments away from leaving the University of Connecticut. As one of only 600 or so black male students at a college of 20,000, he found himself lost in a sea of white faces.

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Yes means yes.

That's essentially what affirmative consent means: that all parties who engage in a sexual activity have to clearly indicate that they want to. 

"My friends are scared, and I am scared," said Yale student Hannah Schmitt, speaking to the General Assembly's Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee on Tuesday.

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Joceline Tlacomulco came to Connecticut from Mexico when she was eight months old. She's now at the University of Connecticut pursuing a degree in music education, but she has to pay her own way.

Backlash to a so-called “ghetto party” at Fairfield University in February has received national attention, drawing coverage from the Huffington Post, Teen Vogue and the New York Times.  “Ghetto parties” — theme parties where students often dress in costumes and act out stereotypes of urban Black youth — have a history in predominantly-white universities.

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The state Freedom of Information Commission in Hartford has ruled that the University of Connecticut trustees violated open-meetings laws when they privately reviewed the school's $1.3 billion proposed budget.

Nike co-founder and Chairman Philip Knight has pledged $400 million to Stanford University for a new scholarship program aimed at tackling major global challenges.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The president of the state's higher education system wants community colleges to be able to hire armed police officers. Colleges and universities are already allowed to do this, but adding community colleges would require legislative approval.

CCSU Professor Resigns After String of Arrests

Feb 3, 2016
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Ravi Shankar, a poetry professor at Central Connecticut State University, has officially resigned after taking an unpaid leave of absence, following a string of arrests last year.

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The University of Connecticut is creating a living and learning community for black men in response to low graduation and retention rates among the school's male African-American students.

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Lisa Rosengrant lost her hearing when she was three. She's now a college student, and she can hear somewhat with the help of hearing aids. But she still has trouble taking notes in class.

North Korean state media said Friday that the country has detained a U.S. student from the University of Virginia for "anti-republic activities."

The state-run agency, KCNA, said the student, Otto Frederick Warmbier, entered North Korea as a tourist but "with a goal to wreck the foundation of state unity ... under the manipulation of the U.S. government."

The U.S. Embassy in Seoul said it was aware of the report.

The University of Virginia's website lists an undergraduate with that name at the McIntire School of Commerce, the university's business school.

University of Connecticut

A  new study shows few low-income Connecticut students earn bachelor degrees within six years of transferring from a community college. 

Combating Sexual Assault and Child Abuse

Jan 15, 2016
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What happens when you change "no means no" to "yes means yes"? Connecticut joins a handful of states that are pushing for new legislation in an effort to combat the epidemic of sexual violence plaguing our college campuses. But do affirmative consent laws go far enough?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The University of Connecticut has announced plans to award an additional $5,000 annually to students from Hartford public schools who meet certain academic and attendance goals. 

Vincent Scarano / Connecticut College

Picture a curbside lined with garbage. You may imagine old mattresses or discarded TVs, but there's one bit of trash your mind may block out: cigarette butts. An anthropology professor at Connecticut College has become obsessed with these often-overlooked artifacts of modern life, examining what they can tell us about our culture -- and the basics of archeology. 

Alabama beat Clemson 45-40 in Monday night's College Football Playoff National Championship, giving the Crimson Tide their fourth title in seven seasons. Heisman-winning running back Derrick Henry ran for 158 yards and scored three touchdowns for Alabama.

It was a remarkably high-scoring game for the teams — Alabama had allowed an average of 13.4 points coming into the game, while Clemson had allowed 20 points per game.

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Advocates for the deaf are concerned that officials at Northwestern Connecticut Community College are slowly phasing out a program that helps deaf and hard-of-hearing students. But school officials claim nothing has changed.

Helder Mira / Connecticut College

The national conversations about race and racism; police and African Americans; free speech on college campuses; “safe spaces” and hate speech and political correctness have all come together in very interesting and interlocked ways here in Connecticut recently.

Eric Westervelt of the NPR Ed team is guest-hosting for the next few weeks on Here & Now, the midday news program from NPR and WBUR.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

College professors say that the state's higher education system is not employing enough full-time teachers. And some professors claim this has caused the full-time faculty to look down on their adjunct colleagues. 

Central Connecticut State University

Faculty at Connecticut's state universities are negotiating with the Board of Regents over a new three-year contract. Last month the new president of the Board, Mark Ojakian joined us to discuss the negotiations from his perspective. This hour, we hear from several of the professors pushing back against cuts and other changes in the public higher education system.

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The University of Massachusetts has announced a deal that will have New England's three FBS football programs facing each other several times over the next five seasons. 

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Connecticut students who learn English as a second language drop out of high school at a rate higher than any other New England state, according to an analysis by the New England Secondary School Consortium

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The Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education is taking a step toward possibly allowing armed security on all state community college campuses. 

Sarah Flaherty / WNPR

Roughly 100 college students and professors gathered in Hartford on Thursday to protest proposed changes to the state's higher education system.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Monday, the first police officer went to trial for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. Just a few days earlier, video was released of a white police officer in Chicago shooting a black man 16 times.

This hour, we talk about race and racism with three people including Hartford resident Gareth Weston, a black man whose own daughter thought he looked like a "bad guy" when wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt. 

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