WNPR

climate change

Former Vice President Al Gore helped shape the conversation about climate change with An Inconvenient Truth. Now he's back with a sequel — called An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, due out next month -- and it follows Gore as he continues the crusade he made famous with that first film.

The movie shows Gore standing in Miami floodwater, flying over imploding boulders of ice in Greenland and in Paris — trying to push the climate agreement over the finish line.

Today is the 200th birthday of author, activist and abolitionist Henry David Thoreau.

Thoreau’s individualist views and distaste for government make him a hero to many people across the political spectrum. But it’s his role as a naturalist and an avid record-keeper that makes him a hero to many scientists. His notes are helping scientists like Boston University biology professor Richard Primack study climate change.

A massive iceberg the size of Delaware has broken free from Antarctica and is floating in the sea.

Earlier Wednesday, scientists announced that the 6,000-square-kilometer (about 2,300 square miles) iceberg had come loose, after satellites detected it had calved off the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

President Trump announced last month the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement — despite attention on the wide ramifications of climate change including its effects on where people can live.

This hour, we talk about why the phenomenon of “climate migration” has a global reach.

Climate scientists agree that this century is getting much warmer and that such warming will likely bring economic pain to the U.S., but economists aren't sure how much. Now, a team of scientists and economists, writing in the upcoming issue of the journal Science, says it can at least tell which parts of the country are likely to suffer the most.

Pages