The hum of textile looms once filled the 19th-century mill buildings throughout downtown Lawrence. Immigrant workers from Ireland and Germany were among some of the first laborers.

Today, many of the mill buildings in Lawrence are home to refurbished work spaces — buzzing with the sounds of artists, innovators and entrepreneurs like Angie Jimenez, who is arranging pots and pans in the site of her future cooking classroom.

Aaron Mentele / Flickr

The modern circus has been thrilling audiences for over 250 years, but as times have changed, so has the circus. What began as little more than an equestrian performance has come to include clowns, trapeze artists and even lion tamers.

Here's what we know about Ahmad Khan Rahami, the suspect in weekend bombings in New York and New Jersey, who was taken into custody on Monday after a shootout with police and charged with five counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer and two counts related to possession of a weapon:

  • He was born in Afghanistan on Jan. 23, 1988.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET with charges

The suspect in the New York and New Jersey bombs has been charged with five counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer. Prosecutors in Union County, N.J., say Ahmad Khan Rahami has also been charged with two weapons crimes. His bail has been set at $5.2 million.

Our original post:

An explosion in Manhattan has injured at least 29 people, according to officials in New York City. The police and fire departments both report that none of the injuries appear life-threatening.

Mayor Bill de Blasio says initial investigations suggest the explosion, on West 23rd Street in Chelsea, was an "intentional act," but that there is "no evidence at this point" of a connection to terrorism.

Police are also investigating "a second potential device" several blocks away, on West 27th Street, de Blasio says.

I was in New York for the weekend, visiting a friend who lives on West 27th Street. We'd been in at an event in Brooklyn; in the cab home, the radio had been saying something about an explosion in Chelsea, on 23rd Street between 6th and 7th — four blocks from her home.

Bonnie-Brown / Creative Commons

The state’s largest business organization has given a cautious welcome to a landmark court ruling, which orders a complete overhaul of Connecticut’s education system. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

In the sweltering afternoon heat, members of several local activist groups in New Haven -- including Black Lives Matter, Unidad Latina en Accion, and People Against Injustice -- organized in front of City Hall and the New Haven Police Department on Tuesday to send a message.

Melissa Bailey / New Haven Independent

New Haven Police Chief Dean Esserman’s three week disciplinary leave ended Monday. But he’s still not back on the job.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we discuss Governor Malloy's Second Chance 2.0 legislation and find out why it failed to pass during the 2016 session. We also look at what some Connecticut communities are doing to support re-entry. And we talk to a local restaurant owner about his decision to hire ex-offenders

A new urban farm in Providence’s Olneyville neighborhood opens today. It’s the fifth urban farm created by the nonprofit Southside Community Land Trust.


The President of the New Haven Police Union said that news that the city’s police chief, Dean Esserman, has been put on paid leave after another outburst is disheartening. This follows reports he allegedly berated a waitress at a local restaurant.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Minor League Baseball’s Eastern League has its All-Star Game in two weeks. Fortunately, that game wasn’t scheduled to be held in Hartford where the Yard Goats baseball stadium is still not completed. 

On Friday Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim launched a new initiative to help ex-felons find jobs.

Ganim was re-elected as mayor of Connecticut's largest city last November after spending seven years in prison. 

One impact of the addiction epidemic has been a skyrocketing rise in newborns experiencing withdrawal after being exposed to opioids in the womb. 

From 2006 to 2011, the number of newborns in withdrawal more than doubled in New Hampshire, and hospitals say the problem is only getting worse.