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Connecticut's Office of Early Childhood is changing their eligibility rules for a child care subsidy program due in part to increased costs.

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For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

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A new report from Connecticut Voices for Children shows that school arrests have decreased significantly in Connecticut. But the decline wasn't nearly as steep for black and mixed race students.

Jamiesrabbits / Creative Commons

A study published this week in JAMA Pediatrics finds a significant increase in the number of hospitalizations of kids due to opioid poisoning.

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This Sunday, we move the clocks back one hour, marking the end of daylight saving time. It’s a welcomed extra hour of sleep for most teenagers and adults, but for younger kids and their parents the time change can really disrupt the routine. There is, however, a pretty simple way to address the transition—the trick is to start early. 

Devon Buchanan / Creative Commons

Since October, women across the country have been coming forward with allegations against Donald Trump. Their actions follow the release of a 2005 video recording, in which the Republican presidential nominee can be heard making vulgar remarks about women. 

Young children and teenagers are increasingly likely to be poisoned by opioid painkillers that are often prescribed for other family members, a study finds.

The rate of children hospitalized for opioid poisoning increased 165 percent from 1997 to 2012, from about 1.40 per 100,000 kids to 3.71 per 100,000. In six years in which mortality data was available, 176 children died.

When Katlyn Burbidge's son was 6 years old, he was performing some silly antic typical of a first-grader. But after she snapped a photo and started using her phone, he asked her a serious question: "Are you going to post that to Facebook?"

She laughed and answered, "Yes, I think I will." What he said next stopped her.

"Can you not?"

That's when it dawned on her: She had been posting photos of him online without asking his permission.

Carol Rosegg / Westport Country Playhouse

Sana Sarr is 11 years old. He goes to a magnet school in Bridgeport. He's in the sixth grade. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A Connecticut man is suing the Boy Scouts of America, claiming he was sexually abused by a Boy Scout leader in the 1990s.

It's a familiar scene for sleep-deprived parents everywhere: They put down the baby in the bassinet to sleep, and those tiny eyes flutter shut. Then they flutter back open and the crying starts. The only thing perhaps more harrowing than those long wakeful nights of a baby's first year is the fear that one day the child won't wake up.

Connecticut’s Department of Children and Families is set to close its last juvenile prison by 2018, and on Thursday showed lawmakers a new plan to send children elsewhere.

If there's one rule that most parents cling to in the confusing, fast-changing world of kids and media, it's this one: No screens before age 2.

As of today, that rule is out the window.

Julie Jordan Scott / Creative Commons

A lot of you reading this are familiar with the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder because you watched the popular "Little House on the Prairie" television show that ran from 1974-1983.

But the television show came long after Laura Ingalls Wilder began sharing the story of her family's journey through the open frontier. She shared her memories in a series of beloved Little House books that spanned a life of pioneering both before and after the government declared the frontier closed. She speaks in simple and intimate prose of everyday life that fascinated millions of young readers who wanted to live like Laura. Fans today still want to believe in the absolute truth of every word. 

CT-N

Children with certain medical conditions can now legally begin receiving medical marijuana in Connecticut. Governor Dannel Malloy signed legislation that extends the state’s medical marijuana program to minors for the first time. 

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