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Children in the mountain town of Orocovis returned to school two weeks ago after a two-month pause following Hurricane Maria. The school doesn't have electricity, so it lets out at 12:30 pm.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Puerto Rican effort to advance from response to recovery after Hurricane Maria continues. For some, water and electricity are still elusive. And that makes it hard to get back to normal — especially for children.

Leah Bahrencu's kidneys and liver shut down. Samantha Blackwell spent a month in a coma. Cindel Pena suffered heart failure. Heather Lavender lost her uterus.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When we hear the words “autism diagnosis” it’s common to imagine a young child or adolescent.

But what about those who receive their diagnoses at a later stage of life -- in the midst of successful careers or long, happy marriages?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut's Office of the Child Advocate has issued a report on the February death of 17 year-old Matthew Tirado of Hartford. The autistic teenager died from malnutrition, weighing only 84 pounds at his death. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ten months after the tragic death of Hartford teenager Matthew Tirado -- a look at what’s being done to safeguard the lives of children with disabilities.

Coming up, we hear about a recent Office of the Child Advocate investigation into the case of 17-year-old Tirado.

The report recommends improvements that apply to school districts statewide. 

trialsanderrors / flickr

Few things evoke such antipathy and condemnation from the western world than the idea of children toiling away for low pay in dangerous conditions. And while there are cases of child labor which truly warrant our concern, the broader truth is a bit more complicated.

In 2001, not long after Oklahoma had adopted one of the nation's first universal pre-K programs, researchers from Georgetown University began tracking kids who came out of the program in Tulsa, documenting their academic progress over time.

In a new report published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management today, researchers were able to show that Tulsa's pre-K program has significant, positive effects on students' outcomes and well-being through middle school.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Members of Connecticut’s legislative delegation are participating in “Days of Kindness” this week, events designed to recognize the fifth anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings.

Spotmatik/iStock / Thinkstock

Health insurance coverage for some 17,000 children in Connecticut is in doubt, as Congress has failed to renew federal funding for what’s known as CHIP, the federal Medicaid Children’s Health Insurance Program or “Husky B.”

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Growing up, author Regina Louise bounced around the foster care system, experiencing one unsuccessful placement after another.

U.S. Department of Education / Creative Commons

We all remember those groundbreaking classics -- from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats to Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. But who is writing, illustrating, and shaping the landscape of children’s literature today?

U.S. Department of Education / Creative Commons

We all remember those groundbreaking classics -- from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats to Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. But who is writing, illustrating, and shaping the landscape of children’s literature today?

Research shows girls and boys perform equally well in science, technology, engineering and math while in school. But that doesn't always follow into careers in the STEM workforce where, particularly in certain fields, there's still a gender gap.

Raúl Hernández González / Creative Commons

This hour: IVF -- in vitro fertilization -- has brought the miracle of life to women and families across the U.S.

Those who have undergone the procedure, however, know it does not come without a cost.

Coming up, we weigh the physical, financial, and emotional demands of IVF treatment.

We hear from doctors and patients.

We also consider a recent New York magazine article about PGS -- the test used to identify viable embryos. How accurate is it? We take a closer look. 

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