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Children in the mountain town of Orocovis returned to school two weeks ago after a two-month pause following Hurricane Maria. The school doesn't have electricity, so it lets out at 12:30 pm.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Puerto Rican effort to advance from response to recovery after Hurricane Maria continues. For some, water and electricity are still elusive. And that makes it hard to get back to normal — especially for children.

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Health insurance coverage for some 17,000 children in Connecticut is in doubt, as Congress has failed to renew federal funding for what’s known as CHIP, the federal Medicaid Children’s Health Insurance Program or “Husky B.”

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Growing up, author Regina Louise bounced around the foster care system, experiencing one unsuccessful placement after another.

U.S. Department of Education / Creative Commons

We all remember those groundbreaking classics -- from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats to Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. But who is writing, illustrating, and shaping the landscape of children’s literature today?

U.S. Department of Education / Creative Commons

We all remember those groundbreaking classics -- from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats to Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. But who is writing, illustrating, and shaping the landscape of children’s literature today?

Research shows girls and boys perform equally well in science, technology, engineering and math while in school. But that doesn't always follow into careers in the STEM workforce where, particularly in certain fields, there's still a gender gap.

Raúl Hernández González / Creative Commons

This hour: IVF -- in vitro fertilization -- has brought the miracle of life to women and families across the U.S.

Those who have undergone the procedure, however, know it does not come without a cost.

Coming up, we weigh the physical, financial, and emotional demands of IVF treatment.

We hear from doctors and patients.

We also consider a recent New York magazine article about PGS -- the test used to identify viable embryos. How accurate is it? We take a closer look. 

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Last week, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting next year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults do not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

flash.pro / Creative Commons

The mass shooting in Las Vegas is dominating the media news cycle. Since the tragedy Sunday night, TV news and social media have displayed a continuous stream of images and video of the chaotic scene at the Highway 91 Harvest Festival that left at least 59 dead.

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

It's National Suicide Prevention Week -- a time to reflect on and raise awareness about an issue that touches thousands of Americans each year.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Juvenile justice reform often focuses on changing a system in which the majority of delinquents are boys. But how do courts and community providers address the needs of girls?

This hour, we find out what advocates have learned from a new report on girls in Connecticut's juvenile justice system. 

Anita Friend / Flickr

If it's the clothes that make the man, then it's the costume that makes the superhero. But for as much as these brightly colored onesies reveal about their wearer, they may in fact reveal more about us as a society.

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Mark Boal is a journalist who has written for Rolling Stone and Playboy and who partnered with Serial on the podcast's second season. Kathryn Bigelow is the director behind movies like Point Blank and Strange Days. As writer and director, Boal and Bigelow have collaborated on three films.

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