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Fox News

Bill O'Reilly is out at Fox News. Serena Williams is pregnant. Melania Trump: photographer. And "Girls" is over.

It's been another weird week, and The Nose is on it.

David Wilson / flickr creative commons

When Dr. David Dau "refused to volunteer" to give up his seat on United Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville earlier this week, aviation police forcibly "re-accommodated" him. And then we had what was maybe the first news cycle since the election that wasn't led by politics.

The Nose finally gets to weigh in, and it's an all-star Nose at that: Rebecca Castellani, Kinky Friedman, and Mellini Kantayya make up the panel.

Kevin Dooley / flickr creative commons

It was 50 years ago today that The Beatles were in the studio working on the follow-up to their 1966 album, Revolver, and on June 1, 1967, they released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Sgt. Pepper's has been called the beginning of the album era. In 2003, Rolling Stone ranked it #1 on their "500 Greatest Albums of All Time." It is the best-selling album of the 1960s.

S-Town Podcast/Serial Podcast/This American Life

S-Town is the new, wimpily titled, seven-hour, non-fiction, southern gothic novel of a podcast that the folks behind Serial and This American Life released all at once this Tuesday, and The Nose has listened to the whole thing.

Some of us even listened to it all at once this Tuesday.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

David E. Kelley is the writer and producer behind "Picket Fences," "Ally McBeal," and "The Practice." Jean Marc-Vallée is the director of "The Young Victoria," "Dallas Buyers Club," and "Wild." Their new HBO show, "Big Little Lies," stars Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, and Laura Dern as feuding mothers in beautiful Monterey, California.

HBO

Here's a familiar formula: stand up comedian + television cameras = sitcom. And, ultimately, that's the math behind HBO's new series "Crashing" starring Pete Holmes and executive produced by Judd Apatow. This show is a little different, though, from things like "Louie" and "Seinfeld" (and a lot different from things like "Roseanne" and "Everybody Loves Raymond") in that it's actually about Holmes's (character's) fledgling stand up career.

Well, excuse me while I throw away my first draft, won't you?

Updated at 12:38 p.m. ET

Bill Paxton, prolific actor and big-screen fixture for decades, has died at the age of 61. In a statement released to media outlets Sunday, a family representative says Paxton died of complications from surgery.

"A loving husband and father, Bill began his career in Hollywood working on films in the art department and went on to have an illustrious career spanning four decades as a beloved and prolific actor and filmmaker," the statement reads.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

Join us on the Trinity College campus in Hartford Friday at 1:00 pm as The Nose picks apart this year's Oscar contest live at Cinestudio.

LeStudio1 / Flickr

Melania Trump is in many ways a first: The first First Lady to have arrived as an immigrant, the first to have been born in a communist country, and the first to be the 3rd wife of a president. She is not the first, however, to show signs of reluctance towards embracing the role of FLOTUS.

Carlos Duplessis / flickr creative commons

New York magazine's Will Leitch has called ESPN's documentary O. J.: Made in America a masterpiece, and now it's nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Documentary -- Feature category. The Nose watched all seven hours and 45 minutes of it, and it's all we're going to be talking about this week.

Amazon

"Sneaky Pete" is a new show on Amazon Prime created by Bryan Cranston and David Shore (who created "House M.D."). Giovanni Ribisi plays a con man (whose name is not Pete, you see) who gets out of jail and moves to Trumbull, Conn., to live with Pete's grandparents (who are not his own grandparents, you see -- even though they don't know that). And then it gets more complicated from there.

HBO

HBO's new limited series "The Young Pope" gives us Jude Law as the Pope. A young one, you see. On the face of it, and in its previews and trailers and such, the show seems... ridiculous? Is maybe the right word? Or maybe it just seems sort of Twin Peaksian, but set at the Vatican. Of course, ridiculous vs. Twin Peaksian is kind of a fine -- and super important -- distinction.

Mary Tyler Moore, who died Wednesday, wasn't just beloved. She was the kind of beloved where they build you a statue. Moore's statue is in Minneapolis, where her best-known character, Mary Richards of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, worked for the fictional television station WJM. She'd already won two Emmys playing Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show, but Moore cemented her icon status when Mary Richards walked into that job interview. Even if she got off to a rough start with Lou Grant, her soon-to-be boss, who kept a bottle of whiskey in his desk.

Mike Grauer Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

  Vin Baker was an Olympic basketball player and four-time NBA All Star. The journey from University of Hartford to professional basketball got him rich quick, but it was a lifestyle he couldn't keep up with.

Baker's struggle with alcoholism is well-documented, as is the fact he blew through $100 million. He lost his home and restaurant.

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