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marnalbano / Creative Commons

As parents, we tell our children to look both ways before crossing the street. We remind them to use crosswalks and to obey crossing signals. But practicing what we preach -- well, that's a whole different story.

Doug Kerr flickr.com/photos/dougtone / Creative Commons

Connecticut State Police are warning travelers about a scam taking place at service areas along the state's highways. 

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

The state is making more rebate money available to customers who buy electric vehicles, or EVs: $2.7 million.

Richard Longstreth

In honor of the impending weekend, we're tossing politics aside and rolling down our windows for a road trip -- a journey through the history of American architecture and our long-standing relationship with on-the-road adventure. 

A federal judge has approved Volkswagen's $14.7 billion settlement over the carmaker's vehicle emissions scandal. The process of compensating affected U.S. car owners is beginning now, with the first buybacks expected to happen within the next few weeks.

Under the terms of the deal, Volkswagen agrees to either buy back or repair vehicles involved in the scandal. That means paying as much as $10.033 billion to owners. In addition, the carmaker has come to an agreement with the United States under which it will pay nearly $5 billion in environmental remediation.

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