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Chion Wolf / WNPR

We couldn’t let March come to a close without recognizing that it’s Women’s History Month.

This hour, we honor the occasion with tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

Courtesy Joe Coss

The job of a public announcer is unique. Joe Coss of Connecticut Public Broadcasting was making calls at Daytona 500 last week, and fresh off the plane, he came into our studio to talk about it.

The promise of automated cars is that they could eliminate human-error accidents and potentially enable more efficient use of roadways. That sounds, at first blush, like self-driving cars could also mean traffic reduction and lower commute times.

But researchers aren't so sure.

Hesham Rakha is an engineering professor at Virginia Tech who studies traffic's flow — or lack thereof.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

With holiday travel expected to reach its highest levels this year, the state Department of Consumer Protection is warning drivers to watch for a type of fraud at the gas pump called “skimming.” 

marnalbano / Creative Commons

As parents, we tell our children to look both ways before crossing the street. We remind them to use crosswalks and to obey crossing signals. But practicing what we preach -- well, that's a whole different story.

Doug Kerr flickr.com/photos/dougtone / Creative Commons

Connecticut State Police are warning travelers about a scam taking place at service areas along the state's highways. 

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

The state is making more rebate money available to customers who buy electric vehicles, or EVs: $2.7 million.

Richard Longstreth

In honor of the impending weekend, we're tossing politics aside and rolling down our windows for a road trip -- a journey through the history of American architecture and our long-standing relationship with on-the-road adventure. 

A federal judge has approved Volkswagen's $14.7 billion settlement over the carmaker's vehicle emissions scandal. The process of compensating affected U.S. car owners is beginning now, with the first buybacks expected to happen within the next few weeks.

Under the terms of the deal, Volkswagen agrees to either buy back or repair vehicles involved in the scandal. That means paying as much as $10.033 billion to owners. In addition, the carmaker has come to an agreement with the United States under which it will pay nearly $5 billion in environmental remediation.

It has been a common belief that low-emissions vehicles, like hybrids and electric cars, are more expensive than other choices. But a new study finds that when operating and maintenance costs are included in a vehicle's price, cleaner cars may actually be a better bet.

The cars and trucks we drive are responsible for about a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions in this country. That's why Jessika Trancik, an energy scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, decided it was time to take a closer look at vehicle emissions.

Marc van der Chijs / Creative Commons

When town officials, planners, and business advocates from across the northeast talk about self-driving cars, one theme emerges: uncertainty.

Get ready, America.

The White House wants you to know that the era of self-driving cars is closer than you might expect. And the federal government is preparing to roll out the rules of the road that officials say are needed to make sure automated vehicles are safe, accessible and efficient. And if done properly, they say the new vehicles will save time, money and lives.

They also say they want to avoid a "patchwork" of regulations that differ from state to state.

Fourteen self-driving Ford Fusions idle in front of Uber's Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh.

On each vehicle, dozens of stationary and spinning cameras collect 1.4 million distance measurements per second, guiding the car on its journey.

Beginning Wednesday, the cars will be deployed on Pittsburgh's streets in a striking experiment by Uber to introduce self-driving technology to its passengers.

Newly released government data paint a sobering picture of safety on the nation's roads and highways.

In 2015, the number of people who died in auto accidents reached 35,092, says the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a 7.2% increase over 2014. The last time there was such a large single-year increase was back in 1966 when Lyndon Johnson was president.

courtesy CT Students for a Dream

Local Connecticut advocates are taking part in the launch of a national campaign for immigration reform called Reason for Reform.

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