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Courtesy NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced off in the third and final presidential debate of the campaign on Wednesday night. The debate took place at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of Connecticut’s top Democrats has fired a shot across the bows of the state’s largest business organization.

Claims by one side — so far without evidence — that the coming presidential election will somehow be "rigged" are being echoed at campaign rallies and in one new poll of voters.

Donald Trump has questioned the integrity of the election, and there's been talk of the race for the Democratic nomination having been rigged at the expense of candidate Bernie Sanders.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Election Day is just around the corner, which means it’s almost time to cast your vote in Connecticut's U.S. Senate race. Last month, Republican candidate Dan Carter stopped by for an in-depth look at his campaign. 

This hour, it's Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal's turn to answer our questions and hear from you. As always, we take your calls, tweets, and emails.  

Updated Dec. 6, 2017, at 11:35 a.m. ET.

For the first time, President Trump publicly addressed allegations against Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore on Tuesday. The president defended Moore, who is accused of making unwanted sexual advances toward teenage girls as young as 14 when he was in his 30s.

"Let me just tell you, Roy Moore denies it," Trump said. "That's all I can say. He denies it. And by the way, he totally denies it."

After a video surfaced last week showing Donald Trump boasting in 2005 how he would kiss and grope women without consent, the GOP nominee insisted in Sunday's presidential debate that it was just "locker room talk" and, pressed repeatedly by CNN's Anderson Cooper, finally said that he had never actually taken the action he described.

DonkeyHotey, creative commons

An offensive and sexist conversation between Donald Trump and Hollywood interviewer Billy Bush has been the catalyst for an even deeper rift in the Republican party. House Speaker Paul Ryan has dropped his support for the GOP nominee, saying he'll instead focus on defending the party's majority in Congress

Maureen McMurray / New Hampshire Public Radio

The job of the media is to inform voters on views and behaviors that relay how a political candidate will behave once elected to office. Fair and honest treatment does not necessarily lead to equal coverage. In the case of Donald Trump, it can lead to asymmetrical coverage of a candidate whose behavior appears to undermine the standards of democratic discourse. 

A riff by Donald Trump at a rally in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., on Monday night about Hillary Clinton's culpability in the deaths of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans in Benghazi, Libya, is raising questions about where exactly Trump got his information and how.

During his speech, Trump held up a piece of paper. "This just came out a little while ago. I have to tell you this," Trump said as he read from the page, which he identified as an email from Clinton confidant Sidney Blumenthal.

Andrew Comings / Creative Commons

Everyone was wondering how Donald Trump would handle the 2005 tape of him talking with Billy Bush about sexually-assaulting women because "you can do anything" when you're a star. Republican support wavered this weekend under the strength of the video, with many Republicans in Congress calling for Trump to relinquish his spot at the top of the GOP ticket.

After the wildest 48 hours yet in the presidential campaign, the second debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton began in the same fashion. The two even declined the traditional handshake at the outset, setting the tenor for the evening.

And throughout the next 90 minutes, the two interrupted each other, called the other a liar and lobbed plenty of personal digs.

The second debate between presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton promised a great deal and managed to deliver on much of it. But those expecting either to see Trump knocked out of the race or to see him dramatically reverse the current campaign momentum went away disappointed.

It could be said this meeting had the highest stakes ever for any single debate, even as it set new lows for the level of personal attacks.

Live Fact Checking the Second Presidential Debate

Oct 9, 2016
Courtesy NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. 

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