campaigns

Ben Burgraff

In 1800, James Callender, pamphleteer and journalist, wrote this about John Adams, one of America's most revered founding father:

It is not so well known, as it should be, that this federal gem [John Adams], this apostle of the parsons of Connecticut, is not only a repulsive pedant, a gross hypocrite, and an unprincipled oppressor, but that he is, in private life, one of the most egregious fools upon the continent. 

He went on to "enquire by what species of madness America submitted to accept, as her president, a person without abilities, and without virtues."

Republican Ted Cruz has ended his presidential candidacy, after Donald Trump won Indiana to all but clinch victory. Bernie Sanders also won, with 52 percent of the vote to Hillary Clinton's 47 percent — but he only saw a net gain of less than a dozen delegates.

Here are five stories that tell us where we are right now:

Ted Cruz suspends presidential campaign, clears way for Donald TrumpHouston Chronicle

How many times must it be over before it's really over?

This time, the endless 2016 presidential primary looks truly over, so long as you're a Republican.

The Republican Party will not name its nominee until July in Cleveland, but the last suspense went out of the contest Tuesday night in Indiana with Donald J. Trump's latest romp over his last serious competitor.

As Bernie Sanders tries to keep his fight for the Democratic nomination for president going amid primary losses in recent weeks, his campaign is starting to talk about influencing the party platform.

Economists at UMass Amherst have been providing academic fodder for Sanders’ proposals.

Political attention turns to the Hoosier State on Tuesday night, where both the Indiana Republican and Democratic presidential primary contests could be especially consequential.

Ted Cruz needs a victory over Donald Trump to stop the latter's march to the GOP nomination, but he's trailing in polls. The Democratic contest is closer, with Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton running neck and neck.

There's an important Republican Senate primary to keep an eye on, too. Here are four things we'll be watching on Tuesday night:

Every week, we say the next race is pivotal, perhaps decisive even. Every week, it's... true, but in different ways.

After Bernie Sanders lost four of the five presidential primaries Tuesday night, the Democratic hopeful's campaign is laying off many staffers.

Noting that 80 percent of the nominating contests have been completed, Sanders spokesman Michael Briggs said in a statement that "we no longer require many of the loyal and dedicated state and national support staffers who helped us."

Championing "stability" and protectionism, Donald Trump managed a sendup of the foreign policies of the last three American presidents, as well as the candidate he is likely to face this fall in a general election — Hillary Clinton.

"With President Obama and Secretary Clinton, we've had ... a reckless, rudderless and aimless foreign policy — one that has blazed a path of destruction in its wake," Trump charged in a sober foreign policy address at a hotel in Washington. He added, "[T]he legacy of the Obama-Clinton interventions will be weakness, confusion and disarray."

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Preliminary voter turnout numbers are high for Tuesday’s Connecticut primary, which was won by the Republican and Democratic front-runners.

Bruce Tuten / Creative Commons

"Acela" primary day has come and gone for five Northeast states, including Connecticut. This hour, we recap the results with a panel of reporters and political experts. Which candidates picked up momentum? And, on the Republican side, was it enough to avoid a contested convention? 

Everyone knew Iowa would matter — and New Hampshire, too. The other February contests got a lot of attention, as did Super Tuesday and the mega-states like New York. And, yes, late in the season, you heard people saying, it might all come down to California.

But when did anyone know to get excited about Indiana?

It comes late in the season, with the great majority of states voting sooner and allocating the great majority of delegates, so no one seemed to give a hoot about the Hoosier State — the one and only primary on May 3.

Hillary Clinton now has 2,141 delegates (with pledged and superdelegates combined), as of midnight Wednesday.

That means she is 90 percent of the way to the 2,383 delegates she needs to clinch the Democratic nomination.

Taking superdelegates out of the equation, she leads Bernie Sanders by 351 pledged delegates. (Clinton has 1,622 to Sanders' 1,282.) Sanders would need two-thirds of all remaining pledged delegates to overtake Clinton in that count.

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Donald Trump has swept the five Republican presidential primaries on Tuesday, including a win in Connecticut.

Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Connecticut. She also won in Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. Bernie Sanders won in Rhode Island.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took definitive steps toward solidifying their respective party's presidential nomination on Tuesday, making their rivals' task to beat them nearly insurmountable.

Trump won all five of the delegate-rich GOP primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island. Clinton notched four victories in Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, while Bernie Sanders won the Rhode Island Democratic primary.

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill’s office says members of the public have been asking about the “uncommitted” line on Tuesday's presidential primary ballot.

Merrill says the ballot line allows eligible voters to ask Connecticut delegates to decide for them at the Democratic and Republican Party conventions.

“It’s interesting because that ‘Uncommitted’ line has always been there, but it has never attracted any interest from anyone except this year. 

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

It's Primary Day in Connecticut and I'm excited about it.

For the first time in a long time, Connecticut voters feel they have a say in which candidate moves on to the general election in November, most of whom spent time speaking to voters in Connecticut this weekend.

WNPR

As presidential candidates crisscross the United States, they have to learn how to win in open primaries, closed primaries, and caucuses. If they want their party's nomination, they need support from average voters and the more high-profile superdelegates. Candidates also must navigate the unique and varying rules of each state's contest. We haven't even gotten to the general election and the electoral college rules!

As Primary Ballots Are Cast, Connecticut Voters Weigh in

Apr 26, 2016
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut Democrats and Republicans are voting on Tuesday in the state’s primaries. 

Five delegate-rich states on the East Coast will vote Tuesday: Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Call it the "Acela Primary" for the train that runs through those states.

There's a lot at stake. Here are four things we're watching:

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Democratic Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders rallied Monday morning by the Hartford riverfront. It was the second of two Connecticut campaign stops after speaking in New Haven Sunday night in front of 14,000 spectators. 

Hillary Clinton was in Central Falls Saturday to campaign in advance of Tuesday’s primary election. 

Rhode Island’s Democractic leadership turned out in force to welcome Clinton, including the state’s congressional delegation and Gov. Gina Raimondo.

Republican presidential candidate John Kasich addressed a crowd at Bryant University Saturday, just a few days before Rhode Island's presidential primary.

Speaking on a range of issues, the Ohio governor discussed his childhood in Pennsylvania coal country, his concerns about the national debt, and his belief that government should ease regulation to help small business owners.

"Our job is not to play politics, do focus groups, worry about re-election," Kasich said. "The fundamental problem we’ve had in America is our leadership has been very poor."

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders brought his insurgent Democratic presidential primary campaign to Rhode Island Sunday, giving an impassioned speech to 7,000 cheering supporters at a sun-dappled Temple to Music at Roger Williams Park in Providence.

Four presidential candidates were in Connecticut over the weekend in an effort to rally support for their candidacies ahead of the state’s Democratic and Republican primaries tomorrow.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, an Independent who is seeking the Democratic Party presidential nomination, had the weekend’s largest rally.

Alan Parkinson / Creative Commons

When history teacher Brandon Lorentz first told his students at Thirman Milner School they would be voting in a mock version of the presidential election, he wasn’t sure how they’d respond.

Deputy Chief Brian J. Foley, twitter feed @ltfoley

For a state that doesn't usually get much attention from presidential candidates, we’ve had a barrage of visits from Democrats and Republicans in the last few weeks, talking about issues that resonate with voters here: guns. Like Hillary Clinton, who brought Sandy Hook families and community members together for a forum in downtown Hartford. 

Hundreds rallied for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Waterbury and Bridgeport, Connecticut, today.

Ohio Governor John Kasich was in Connecticut again Friday, trying to reassure his supporters that he still has a chance to win the presidential nomination at the Republican convention in Cleveland.

The primary elections across five states Tuesday could decide the nominations of both parties.

That's especially true on the Democratic side. (For the Republicans, scroll down.) Bernie Sanders has come a long way, but the Vermont independent is running out of friendly states. Tuesday is no different, as all but one of the contests (Rhode Island) in these Northeast states are closed primaries.

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