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Murphy Tells Democrats To Fight Trump, Not Each Other

May 19, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy accepted the Democratic nomination for a second term Friday with a speech framing the 2018 election up and down the ballot as an existential battle for control of Hartford and Washington with a Republican Party that has lost its compass with President Donald Trump at the helm.

Ganim The Last To Oppose Lamont At Convention

May 18, 2018
Joe Ganim and Ned Lamont are the last Democratic candidates for governor heading into the weekend's convention.
Ryan Caron King/Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Intrigue over down-ballot races for lieutenant governor, treasurer and attorney general are expected to dominate this weekend’s Democratic convention as an unopposed U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy is nominated by acclamation for a second term Friday night and Ned Lamont is poised to win the endorsement for governor on a single ballot Saturday.

Floor Challenge Promised To Bysiewicz As Lamont's L.G.

May 17, 2018
Eva Bermudez Zimmerman
Campaign website

Eva Bermudez Zimmerman, who had a conversation with gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont about the possibility of becoming the Connecticut Democrats’ first Hispanic statewide nominee as his running mate before he picked Susan Bysiewicz, said Wednesday night she will seek the nomination for lieutenant governor Saturday.

Harris Ends Bid For Governor, Endorses Lamont

Apr 27, 2018
Ned Lamont, left, and Jonathan Harris at a recent forum.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Jonathan Harris dropped out of the race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination today and endorsed Ned Lamont, giving the Greenwich businessman a jolt of momentum less than a month before the Democratic nominating convention. 

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The wide-open race for governor means lots of campaigns will need cash if they want to compete in November. In Connecticut, one way to do that is through public financing -- a program called the Citizens’ Election Program. But how, exactly, does the program work?

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

It's going to be a long fight leading up to Election Day, based on newly released campaign fundraising totals in Connecticut's race for governor and the Republican Governors Association's plan to reserve $1.7 million for television ads in the contest.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The mayors of some of Connecticut’s largest towns are hoping to ride their political connections into the state’s highest office. One obvious way to do that is to court campaign donations. But politicians running for election in 2018 need to be savvy enough to raise that money quickly, and to raise it right -- stockpiling tiny contributions from all over Connecticut -- in the hopes of unlocking a multi-million dollar prize: public financing.

Joe Arpaio, the controversial former sheriff from Arizona, announced this week that he will run for the U.S. Senate to help advance President Trump's agenda.

But he is breaking from the president on the future of people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

"Deport them," Arpaio told NPR Morning Edition's Rachel Martin in an interview that aired Thursday morning.

Updated at 12:05 p.m. ET

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., announced he will not seek re-election Wednesday, adding to a record number of House Republicans heading for the exits ahead of the 2018 midterms — perhaps seeing the writing on the wall of a possible wave election for Democrats.

There are now 31 Republicans who will not seek re-election in November: 19 who are retiring outright and another 12 who are running for higher office. And that list is is expected to grow in the coming weeks.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, who served nearly seven years in prison for corruption, filed paperwork Wednesday to launch his campaign for governor.

Updated at 2:15 a.m. ET Thursday

Steve Bannon, President Trump's former chief strategist, once called a now-famous meeting among Donald Trump Jr., campaign chairman Paul Manafort, Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner and a group of Russians "treasonous," according to accounts of an upcoming book.

Alabamians head to the polls Tuesday to vote for their next U.S. senator. For some, it will be the third time this year they've cast a ballot to determine who will assume the seat recently occupied by current Attorney General Jeff Sessions for two decades.

The circuitous path to get to this point has been nothing short of extraordinary.

Nearly a year after Election Day, Americans have the clearest picture yet about the extent of the influence campaign Russia ran against the United States in 2016.

The operation had a clandestine side and an overt side, and aspects that moved from one into the other. It involved a number of Russian government intelligence officers and cyber-operatives within Russia, as well as at least a few operatives working in the West.

And, according to at least one former top U.S. spymaster, it went better than its authors could have possibly imagined.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

Conservative firebrand Roy Moore rolled to an easy win in the Alabama GOP Senate primary runoff, defeating appointed Sen. Luther Strange, the preferred candidate of both President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Tuesday night, both Trump and McConnell pledged their support for Moore going forward.

President Trump and his allies aren't exactly running the playbook Republicans want him to ahead of the 2018 midterms. And that could be costly for the GOP at the ballot box next year.

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