The chair of the state Republican Party said a Democratic candidate has violated state election law by invoking the name and image of Donald Trump in a political ad.

From the outset, Democrats needed a very big-wave election to get to the 30 seats they need to win back control of the House. Then, a video of Donald Trump surfaced showing the GOP nominee making lewd comments, and later multiple women accused him of groping them. That left some wondering if these scandals could trigger that wave.

But that simply hasn't happened.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was overall more cordial and more policy-focused than their nasty second debate faceoff. But the stunning moment that will stand out is the GOP nominee's statement that he won't necessarily accept the results of the election on Nov. 8.

"I will tell you at the time," Trump said in a shocking statement that signals a break from the traditional transfer of power. "I will keep you in suspense."

Courtesy NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced off in the third and final presidential debate of the campaign on Wednesday night. The debate took place at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of Connecticut’s top Democrats has fired a shot across the bows of the state’s largest business organization.

Claims by one side — so far without evidence — that the coming presidential election will somehow be "rigged" are being echoed at campaign rallies and in one new poll of voters.

Donald Trump has questioned the integrity of the election, and there's been talk of the race for the Democratic nomination having been rigged at the expense of candidate Bernie Sanders.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Election Day is just around the corner, which means it’s almost time to cast your vote in Connecticut's U.S. Senate race. Last month, Republican candidate Dan Carter stopped by for an in-depth look at his campaign. 

This hour, it's Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal's turn to answer our questions and hear from you. As always, we take your calls, tweets, and emails.  

Updated Oct. 20 at 2:34 p.m. to include the Trump campaign's response to Karena Virginia's allegations.

The allegations against Donald Trump of inappropriate sexual behavior had quieted down, but on Thursday morning, another woman spoke up. The latest accuser, Karena Virginia, held a Thursday press conference with attorney Gloria Allred, in which Virginia alleged that Trump groped her in 1998.

Trump has thus far denied any of the incidents and has also threatened to sue the New York Times, which reported two of the most recent accusations.

After a video surfaced last week showing Donald Trump boasting in 2005 how he would kiss and grope women without consent, the GOP nominee insisted in Sunday's presidential debate that it was just "locker room talk" and, pressed repeatedly by CNN's Anderson Cooper, finally said that he had never actually taken the action he described.

DonkeyHotey, creative commons

An offensive and sexist conversation between Donald Trump and Hollywood interviewer Billy Bush has been the catalyst for an even deeper rift in the Republican party. House Speaker Paul Ryan has dropped his support for the GOP nominee, saying he'll instead focus on defending the party's majority in Congress

Maureen McMurray / New Hampshire Public Radio

The job of the media is to inform voters on views and behaviors that relay how a political candidate will behave once elected to office. Fair and honest treatment does not necessarily lead to equal coverage. In the case of Donald Trump, it can lead to asymmetrical coverage of a candidate whose behavior appears to undermine the standards of democratic discourse. 

A riff by Donald Trump at a rally in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., on Monday night about Hillary Clinton's culpability in the deaths of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans in Benghazi, Libya, is raising questions about where exactly Trump got his information and how.

During his speech, Trump held up a piece of paper. "This just came out a little while ago. I have to tell you this," Trump said as he read from the page, which he identified as an email from Clinton confidant Sidney Blumenthal.

Andrew Comings / Creative Commons

Everyone was wondering how Donald Trump would handle the 2005 tape of him talking with Billy Bush about sexually-assaulting women because "you can do anything" when you're a star. Republican support wavered this weekend under the strength of the video, with many Republicans in Congress calling for Trump to relinquish his spot at the top of the GOP ticket.

After the wildest 48 hours yet in the presidential campaign, the second debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton began in the same fashion. The two even declined the traditional handshake at the outset, setting the tenor for the evening.

And throughout the next 90 minutes, the two interrupted each other, called the other a liar and lobbed plenty of personal digs.

The second debate between presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton promised a great deal and managed to deliver on much of it. But those expecting either to see Trump knocked out of the race or to see him dramatically reverse the current campaign momentum went away disappointed.

It could be said this meeting had the highest stakes ever for any single debate, even as it set new lows for the level of personal attacks.

Courtesy NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. 

This post was updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

In the middle of a maelstrom of criticism over remarks where he boasted about sexual assault, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is trying to turn the tables on his opponent.

Reacting to the recent release of audio of Donald Trump making vulgar comments about women, President Obama called the candidate "insecure" and said he "pumps himself up by putting other people down — not a character trait I would advise for somebody in the Oval Office."

Ahead of the second presidential debate Sunday night, the secret Donald Trump audiotape of him bragging about groping and kissing women — and let's be clear, if he did what he's bragging that he did, it would be assault — has shaken the presidential race and is reshaping the presidential map.

Yes, the majority of Trump's supporters are likely to stay with him, but any chance he had at winning over those persuadable voters might very well be gone.

Donald Trump has apologized for his vulgar comments about women that were revealed in a recording obtained by the Washington Post on Friday.

Reaction to the video of Donald Trump using explicit language and apparently describing himself forcing himself on women continues to roll in. And it is not good for the GOP nominee. Prominent Republicans are calling on him to drop out and elected officials are running from him and fast. See the full list of Republicans calling on Trump to step down at the bottom on this post.

The controversial whistleblower organization WikiLeaks on Friday released emails that they say are linked to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

Editor's note: This post contains language that is crude and explicit and that many will find offensive.

Updated 11:15 p.m. ET with comments by Trump supporters

Just two days before Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are set to meet for their second presidential debate, more damaging audio of the GOP nominee using crude language about women and how he would hit on them has surfaced.