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General Electric plans to donate $50 million over the next five years to Boston and the surrounding area.

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David Brancaccio

If you want to know where the economy’s going, who would you want sit next to on a plane? Fed chair Janet Yellen is a good answer. So is Ray Dalio, a legendarily successful investor. Dalio is founder and CEO of Bridgewater Associates, the largest hedge fund manager in the world. Dalio bases his investment decisions less on abstract financial data, and more on his reading of the macro economy.

Alan Light / Creative Commons

More than 70 airports in upstate New York are eligible to compete for a share of $200 million in state funds up for grabs in a new state competition from Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Pfizer and Allergan won't be merging after all, the companies announced Wednesday.

U.S. drugmaker Pfizer and Irish competitor Allergan were planning to combine into the largest pharmaceutical giant in the world.

U.S. companies will find it much harder to reduce their taxes by merging with foreign firms under new rules introduced by the Obama administration, and that's already throwing the fate of one big deal in doubt.

Shares of Allergan were down sharply Tuesday, as investors questioned whether its $150 billion merger with pharmaceutical giant Pfizer will still take place.

General Electric has committed to donating $50 million to Massachusetts philanthropy as the company prepares to move its corporate headquarters to Boston. 

The Boston Public Schools will be the biggest beneficiary, in line to receive $25 million for computer science courses and other career preparedness. Another $15 million will go to community health centers around greater Boston.  GE will reserve $10 million for workforce training programs in cities and towns outside the Boston metro area.  

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The New York Yankees' opening day game was postponed until Tuesday at 1:00 pm, but some fans were still not be able to watch the game on television. 

The parent company of Alaska Airlines has struck a deal to buy Virgin America, creating a West Coast-focused airline. If approved by regulators and Virgin America's shareholders, the combined airline will be the fifth-largest U.S. carrier, according to Alaska Air Group.

"By bringing them together, we're creating the premier airline for people who live anywhere on the West Coast," Alaska Air Group CEO Brad Tilden said in a statement.

The U.S. economy gained 215,000 jobs in March, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says in its monthly report released Friday. The unemployment rate rose slightly to 5 percent, up from 4.9 percent in the month before.

"The increase in the unemployment rate came because we had more people looking for work," economist Gus Faucher of PNC Financial Services tells our Newscast unit.

A Beijing-based banking and insurance company has lost the fight for Starwood Hotels, leaving Marriott as the prospective new owner of the company that operates the Sheraton and Westin hotel chains.

Announcing its exit from takeover talks Thursday, the Anbang Insurance Group cited "various market considerations." The withdrawal came days after Starwood said there was a good chance the Chinese firm would make a "superior proposal" to Marriott's.

Tesla, the maker of electric vehicles, Thursday night unveiled its mass-market Model 3. The car is expected to have a range of 215 miles at a base price of $35,000 ($27,500 after federal tax credits).

Tesla CEO Elon Musk told a crowd of loyal fans in Hawthorne, Calif., he is "fairly confident" the vehicle will go on sale in 2017. That the assembled crowd laughed at the statement is a sign of the near-cult following Tesla (and Musk) enjoy.

By 10 p.m. PDT, the company had received 140,000 advance orders, according to Musk, for a car almost no one had seen.

General Electric wants to be removed from the federal government's list of too-big-to-fail financial institutions, arguing that it's no longer a major player in the financial services industry.

Pepperidge Farm/Trader Joe's

Snack giant Pepperidge Farm has settled its cookie lawsuit. 

Throughout the fight over whether Apple should help unlock the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone was the understanding that this was not Apple's first time at bat.

Now, documents show that Apple has been facing similar requests since at least 2008, and that the Silicon Valley giant is not alone, as Google, too, has fielded calls for help unlocking phones in court, for instance to bypass a lock screen and reset a password.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Fairfield University said it will partner to redevelop the headquarters campus that General Electric is leaving in the town.

The high-profile public and legal dispute between the government and Apple is officially over after the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino terrorists without Apple's help.

The Justice Department says it has successfully retrieved the data from the phone and is asking the court to vacate its order for Apple's assistance.

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The thaw in relations with Cuba has sparked a huge amount of interest in the possibility of doing business with that nation, after 60 years of isolation. And one Connecticut entrepreneur hopes it's not just U.S. giants that get to play in Cuba.

The rumor mill is on.

A report by an Israeli newspaper, citing anonymous industry sources, pointed the finger at an Israeli company as the firm helping the FBI get inside the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters.

General Electric wants to be one of the first American companies to capitalize on the thaw in U.S.-Cuba relations. The Fairfield-based conglomerate expressed its interest in providing power, aviation and medical equipment to the Cuban government in an agreement signed Monday. 

The FBI may have found a new way to crack into the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters — a method that doesn't require Apple's help.

This is a major new development in the increasingly heated debate between the tech giant and the government, which has argued that Apple should be compelled to write new special software that would override some security features. That was the only way, investigators previously had said, that they could crack the phone's passcode without jeopardizing its contents.

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear Samsung's appeal of a Federal Circuit Court ruling in the company's patent infringement dispute with Apple.

At issue in the case: What portion of the profits is a design-patent infringer liable to pay?

Apple accuses the South Korean tech giant of copying patented aspects of the iPhone's design, such as the round-cornered front face and the colorful icon grid.

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The drama involving Stamford’s Starwood Hotels and Resorts continues. It now looks as if the company will go with its original merger partner after all. 

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An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

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Some residents say a Bloomfield attorney should have recused himself from offering the town legal advice on a tax abatement for a water bottling plant because he works for the water authority.

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Casino mogul Steve Wynn said he doesn't care about a rival casino being developed south of Boston by the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe.

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Connecticut’s latest jobs report is giving cause for concern.

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Should the state of Connecticut become just the fourth in the nation to mandate paid family and medical leave for private employees? The question looks set to generate plenty of debate in Hartford this session, but the battle lines are more complicated than you might imagine. 

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Laura McKenna went looking for information on a medical condition that would help her care for her child. Unfortunately, she couldn't access most of the articles she located without paying as much as thirty-eight dollars for an eight-page report. She never read it.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

MGM Resorts International, the gaming group building a casino in Springfield, is now funding a lawsuit by the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation against Connecticut’s proposed third casino. 

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

MGM International wants to give Connecticut a little advice about siting its proposed new casino. The gaming group has released a study which says if Connecticut put a third casino somewhere in Fairfield County, it would generate more revenue and more jobs. 

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