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Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

Connecticut is out of the running to host Amazon's monster second headquarters. The internet retail giant Thursday released its shortlist of 20 communities that it's still considering. Hartford and Stamford, Connecticut's official bidders, are out of luck. 

In the competition for Amazon's second headquarters, just 20 metropolitan areas remain in the running.

Last year, Amazon set off a hyper-competitive proposal process, saying that it plans to invest $5 billion in building a second headquarters that could create up to 50,000 high-paying jobs.

The Seattle-based company, which is a financial supporter of NPR, says it reviewed 238 proposals in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Here are the metropolitan areas that made the cut:

The conglomerate General Electric says it is considering a breakup after taking $6 billion in losses to its insurance division.

For decades, GE gobbled up businesses as diverse as credit cards, jet engines, and TV networks. But last year, the company started losing bets made on coal and oil. Then came losses on power plants. Now it’s insurance. GE’s freshly-minted CEO John Flannery says its long-term care insurance division will lose $6 billion this year and $15 billion in the future.

In a narrow alley just behind a busy Queens street, Hernán's kitchen makes more than 4,000 churros each day for street vendors to sell across New York City. From 3 a.m., hours before nearby shop owners unlock their front gates, the kitchen fills with the sound of churro batter beating against the sides of large industrial mixers.

The kneaded dough is shaped by a long dispenser that drops it into sizzling hot oil. The churros — long, striated doughnuts — are finished with a sprinkling of sugar and cinnamon and stacked high on baking trays by Hernán's wife.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Pharmacy chain CVS has confirmed it will keep Aetna’s headquarters in Connecticut after the two companies merge, nixing a plan to move workers to New York City.

Vornado Realty Trust

Health insurer Aetna still won’t say if its headquarters move to New York City is off. The city Thursday announced it was canceling its offer of financial incentives. 

Arthur Caranta / Flickr

They may not look like R2D2 or BB8, but in 2018, robots are an important part of our world.

This hour we talk about ​automation—new advances in “smart” technology during a period of time that’s been dubbed the “Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

A glitch in the Republican tax overhaul has created an uncertain future for Newman’s Own Foundation and the food company it operates.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Puerto Rico is officially declaring itself open for tourism -- nearly three months after Hurricane Maria. But on an island where so many people still lack electricity, what does open for tourism mean?

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

In the wake of Hurricane Maria, and with the end of the year approaching, the Department of Consumer Protection has some tips for people who want to give.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Puerto Rico se está declarando oficialmente abierto al turismo, cerca de tres meses después del Huracán María. Pero en una isla en la que aún tantas personas carecen de electricidad, ¿qué significa abierto al turismo?

A little-remarked-upon provision changing the way inflation is calculated is among the big changes contained in the tax overhaul signed by President Trump last week.

The new method, using the so-called "chained" consumer price index to determine when to adjust tax brackets and eligibility for deductions, is expected to push more Americans into higher tax brackets more quickly. In the past, the tax code used the traditional CPI measure issued by the Labor Department each month.

For the most part, the minimum wage gap among New England states will narrow in 2018.

Confirming iPhone owners' suspicions that Apple purposefully slows the operation of older phones, Apple says that it does just that — and that slowing down processors makes it easier for old batteries to perform after they've begun to lose capacity.

John Skipper has resigned from his top position at ESPN and co-chairmanship of the Disney Media Networks. Skipper had recently signed a contract extending his leadership to 2021.

"Today I have resigned from my duties as President of ESPN," Skipper said in a statement released on Monday. "I have had a wonderful career at the Walt Disney Company and am grateful for the many opportunities and friendships."

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