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WNPR/Jeff Cohen

Harriet Jones

In business, time is money, and time was at a premium yesterday at a special event in West Hartford. Small businesses from around Connecticut gathered to meet with government agencies and big government contractors for a chance to win new work. But as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, they had to be quick.

Hone your elevator pitch and get ready to make a great first impression, because you only have minutes face-to-face with the government contractor of your dreams.

Paris Air Show

Connecticut companies both large and small are doing business at the prestigious Paris Air Show this week, the world’s largest gathering of aerospace companies. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

via WikiMedia Commons

WASHINGTON -- As T. Boone Pickens lobbies Congress to enact subsidies for the natural gas industry, the Texas oil and gas tycoon also is bringing his zeal for natural gas vehicles to Connecticut in a deal involving a non-profit corporation, two taxi companies and millions in stimulus dollars.

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Harriet Jones

Connecticut’s multi-million dollar investment in a new high-speed rail line from New Haven to Springfield is supposed to spur economic development. And for some communities it will mean big changes. WNPR’s Harriet Jones went to talk to small business owners in Meriden about their hopes for the city as the new line comes through.

It’s a sunny day in downtown Meriden and Ron Dagan and I are walking on a street parallel to the nearby train tracks.

Chion Wolf

Hedge Funds

Jun 8, 2011
AMagill, Creative Commons

Hedge Fund managers are America’s new economic elite...they weathered the storm of the financial collapse better than anyone, and have made the kind of money that’s hard to imagine.  In fact, author Sebastian Mallaby calls it “More Money Than God.” He’s studied the history of hedge funds for this bestselling book that’s - now out in paperback.  

He paints a picture of complicated men - who crave secrecy, exude eccentricity, and who have unlocked the mystery of how markets work, making billions in the process.

alancleaver_2000 / Creative Commons

Two types of small businesses in Connecticut have been pitted against one another in recent months by a controversial piece of legislation. The measure, which goes into effect July 1st, attempts to force Internet retailers to levy sales tax in the state for the first time.

As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, some are calling it the “Amazon tax.”

This is North Cove Outfitters in Old Saybrook, where Iain McGowan is helping a customer.

Chion Wolf

Our roller coaster economy has been a leveler - throwing the formerly rich and lower income people into the same basket.

We thought we'd talk about debt, credit cards and bankruptcy with Mitchell Allen, author of A Survival Guide to Debt.  He has been a debt counselor to many.

Thomas MacMillan Photo

People told Giuliana Maravalle she was crazy when she moved her piano bar and gelato factory to a neglected industrial warehouse on Sargent Drive. One year later, she’s ready to expand the business with a new country and western bar, and people are eating her “artisanal” Italian treat from the Boston Symphony to JFK airport thanks to the work of a dozen additional employees.

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. 

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Harriet Jones

This recession began with the bursting of the housing bubble, and home building has been one of the industries hardest hit in its aftermath. Eighty percent of new houses in Connecticut are built by local, small construction companies. WNPR’s Harriet Jones went to find out how those survivors have reinvented themselves.

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