Harriet Jones

The rise of the Internet has changed the face of marketing for small companies.  And for some, it’s changed the way they do business entirely. In the second of our occasional series, WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports on one small Connecticut business that’s gone completely virtual.

As any UConn fan knows, the business of sports is big business.  Scott Yeager is showing me round the warehouse of his sports apparel company, Husky Wear.

And the list goes on. And on.

Chion Wolf

Economists worry about a “double-dip” recession as the state and federal governments try to create jobs.  

We’re live today at the Connecticut Science Center for one of our quarterly Small Business Breakfasts.  It’s done in conjunction with our Small Business Project, where we look at how entrepreneurs are faring in this economy.

courtesy Plastic Forming Company

Small businesses everywhere are learning the lesson – adapt to technology or die. Consumers increasingly look for both marketing and retailing online and companies need to meet those expectations or lose sales. In the first of a series of reports on the rise of social media in marketing, WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at how one manufacturer is facing up to the challenge.

The prolonged slump in the housing market has been tough on the economy and tougher on anyone trying to sell their home. It’s also been a trial for realtors, most of whom don’t see a paycheck from one long-delayed sale to the next. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Jordan and Elizabeth Hudak are members of that rare species, serious home buyers. They’re viewing a house in Avon. You might think they’re sitting pretty… not so, says Elizabeth Hudak.

MiiiSH, Creative Commons

Steve Jobs’ departure from Apple has people talking about what makes a great business leader.

You’d have thought the pope or the president was stepping down.  Such was the adulation laid on the outgoing leader - and such was the worry.  Can he be replaced?  

Jobs made such an impact at Apple not because he’s good at computers, but because he’s been able to transform a successful business several times through the force of personality, his vision and charisma.

respres, creative commons

Hurricane Irene, and the string of devastating weather events across the country have taken our focus away from another crisis.

Depending on the analysis you believe, we’re either still in recession, about to head back into another one, or in a painfully slow recovery.  

The prime cause of this economic catastrophe has been known for quite some time - the sub-prime housing bubble that burst sending property values plummeting - and millions into foreclosure.  

Revisiting the "Amazon Tax"

Aug 26, 2011
J Holt

The passage of an internet sales tax in Connecticut earlier this year was highly controversial. Even the commissioner of the Department of Revenue Services warned the state might suffer economic damage. WNPR’s J Holt brings us the story of one company dealing with the consequences of the new law.

Warchol- “Go get it!” (Dog panting)

That’s Josh Warchol and his dog Jesse. For the last three years, Josh has been senior engineer for a small software company called Fanzter

Even in these uncertain times, the federal government has a lot of tax dollars to spend. But if you run a small business, taking advantage of that opportunity can seem pretty daunting. A recent conference in southeastern Connecticut aimed to demystify the process of doing business with the feds.

WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Three Rivers Community College in Norwich hosted this day-long seminar, organized by the office of second district congressman Joe Courtney.

Harriet Jones

Swiss bank UBS will retain a significant presence in Stamford after the state of Connecticut extended the company a $20 million loan. But, as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports job cuts seem likely at the bank’s Connecticut operations.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Amid all the many tax changes taking place in Connecticut right now, more than 70,000 businesses are receiving a special bill from the state Department of Labor. The cash will go toward paying interest on federal loans that the state has taken out in order to keep paying unemployment benefits. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Mark Richards runs an IT consulting and recruitment company in Shelton, and he employs 25 people. He’s already grappling with changing his payroll to impose a higher income tax on many of his employees.

Bethel Auto Shop Turns A Passion Into A Livelihood

Aug 17, 2011
Sarah Miner

If you have a hobby that's a passion, you might occasionally have thought of turning it into a business. Actually achieving that is very rare – but that is exactly how automotive shop EFI Logics in Bethel, Connecticut began. WNPR's Sarah Miner reports.

Back in 2008,  the stock market began to plummet, businesses were downsizing, people were getting laid off. The economy was heading into the worst recession in a generation. Jack Laverty and Chris  Schoen-Kiewert saw it as a great opportunity.