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Seattle Municipal Archives / Flickr Creative Commons

A 1965 Senate subcommittee predicted that Americans would work 14-hour weeks by the year 2000. Needless to say, their prediction was a little off. Fifty years later, the five-day, 40-hour work week remains the standard here in the U.S. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In June, General Electric confirmed it’s considering a move out of Connecticut. The news came amid a state budget battle over corporate tax hikes. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut’s tourism industry is seeing a healthy rebound this year, more than doubling national growth rates. 

Hiring an employee is an expensive proposition. Workers' compensation, social security and other expenses can run thousands of dollars a year, so it's no surprise that companies often try to reduce expenses keeping workers off the payroll, calling them independent contractors instead.

But sometimes they do so in violation of state law. And in a new report, State Auditor Doug Hoffer says the state isn't doing enough to stop a practice known as "misclassification."

The world’s largest maker of passenger rail cars is planning to break ground this week on a new factory in western Massachusetts.

Governor Charlie Baker is among the officials scheduled to speak Thursday at the ceremony to mark the start of construction on a $60 million 200,000 square foot factory on Springfield’s east side. 

CNR-MA, a subsidiary of Chinese government-owned Changchun Rail Vehicles, purchased the 40 acre site for $12 million, according to spokesperson Lydia Rivera.

Construction to upgrade one of Connecticut’s most important freight rail lines can begin, after the state received an $8 million federal grant. The funding arrives as the issue of how we move goods around the state is coming front and center. 

Heather / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Insurance Department has called on one health insurer to raise its premiums more than the company requested for next year, saying it had underestimated medical inflation and overestimated cost savings.

Unemployment Down, But Dream Jobs Still Out Of Reach

Aug 31, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In New York and Connecticut, unemployment is at 5.4 percent, the lowest it has been in seven years. Nationwide, unemployment has dropped its lowest levels since the recession, giving those entering the workforce more opportunity. But for many, that elusive dream job is still out of reach. 

Karen Bordeleau, who rose to become The Providence Journal's first female executive editor during a 20-year career at the newspaper, is leaving Fountain Street after slightly more than two years in the post.

MGM is setting out to fill some of the 2,000 construction jobs that were promised to build the company’s $800 million Springfield casino.

MGM officials are scheduling two days of interviews, Thursday and Friday, with minority-owned and women-owned union construction companies interested in bidding for jobs on the project. 

The Las Vegas-based entertainment company  interviewed veteran-owned businesses in July at its Springfield construction office. 

State of Massachusetts / Division of Ecological Restoration

A decision paving the way for an Indian tribe-run casino in Massachusetts appears imminent. The federal Bureau of Indian Affairs notified officials in Taunton, a city about 40 miles south of Boston, that it will issue an opinion on the Mashpee Wampanoag's application for land in trust status in 30 days. 

Wal-Mart, thought to be the largest seller of firearms in the U.S., will stop selling military-style modern sporting rifles, such as the the AR-15, this fall.

Wal-Mart spokesman Kory Lundberg said the decision to phase out the controversial semi-automatics was based in business, not politics, citing declining demand.

CT Labor Department

The state Department of Labor is facing some pushback to its decision to close six job centers in Connecticut.

Simon

A mall developer has unveiled a plan for a new upscale outlet facility in Windsor Locks, near Bradley Airport. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy says he last visited with General Electric two weeks ago, as the conglomerate prepares to make a decision about relocation. The governor spoke for the first time about the possibility that GE might leave.

Stocks opened Monday with a swan dive: The Dow Jones industrial average plunged about 1,000 points, or 5 percent, in just minutes.

By midday, enough brave buyers had waded back in to push up prices — up to where losses were only around 1 percent or so.

But that didn't last. Around 3 p.m., the Dow dropped again, sliding nearly 700 points.

Stress-filled minutes ticked down until 4 p.m.: CLANG, CLANG, CLANG.

The closing bell rang. Brows were wiped, and commentators scrambled to explain why investors had seen both panic selling and panic buying.

Led by an 8.5 percent drop in China's Shanghai composite index, U.S. and global stock markets took a dive Monday. Shortly after opening, the Dow Jones index fell by more than 1,000 points, or 5 percent. The Dow then zigzagged to close at 15,871, losing about 3.6 percent of its value.

The Ethan Allen furniture company is under pressure from one of its investors to either sell itself or divest some of its real estate assets. Sandell Asset Management, which owns 5.5 percent of Ethan Allen, said the company's stock is underperforming. 

Michael Raphael / FEMA

The state's unemployment rate has fallen to 5.4 percent, according to the Department of Labor. The department's Bureau of Labor Statistics said Thursday the state added 4,100 jobs in July.

Daniel Mayer / Creative Commons

Just a day after revelations about New York's bid to move General Electric's headquarters, Bloomberg is reporting that Georgia is also in the market for GE. Citing unnamed sources, the business news service says that executives are planning to meet with a property agency in Atlanta in coming weeks.

Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit

The governor of New York is reported to be courting General Electric to make a move across the state border. 

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

The Department of Justice will extend its anti-trust review of Aetna’s proposed merger with Humana for another 30 days. The Hartford based health insurer just announced it's re-filing its notification with the department to allow for the month-long extension. 

A group of hackers, who calls itself the Impact Team, purportedly released a huge trove of data that appears to contain the account details of more than 30 million users of a website that helps married people cheat on their spouses.

The first casino in Massachusetts netted $18 million in its first full month in business.

 People gambled $181 million at the Plainridge Park Casino in July, according to the Massachusetts Gaming Commission.  The casino kept $18 million. Over a full year it works out to $217 million in gross gaming revenue, which would be more than the state’s full-year projection of $200 million.  

Casino industry expert Clyde Barrow said Plainridge Park had a spectacular opening.

Mixabest / Creative Commons

New Haven and Fairfield Counties host many of the state’s fastest growing tech companies, according to a new listing. The Marcum Tech Top 40 is also strong on software and advanced manufacturing firms. 

monkeybusinessimages/iStock / Thinkstock

Connecticut manufacturers are closely watching events in China as the country allows its currency to devalue. Government control of the yuan has for years been a point of contention for companies, who said it gives Chinese manufacturers an unfair advantage in export markets.

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s annual sales tax-free shopping week begins on Sunday, but some shoppers might need to plan their purchases carefully to qualify. Only clothing and footwear items under $100 are eligible for tax-free purchase this year; in previous years, items could be up to $300.

Jason Tester Guerrilla / Creative Commons

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought against the ride-sharing service Uber by taxi and limousine companies in Connecticut. 

Embracing Risk in Our Working Lives

Aug 13, 2015
Quinn Dombrowski/flickr creative commons

Gone are the days of graduating from college, paying your dues with a few entry-level positions, and landing a 30-year career with a big corporation, complete with retirement benefits.

StockMonkeys.com on Flickr Creative Commons

A lawsuit against General Electric is being closely watched in boardrooms around America, as the company defends its decision to shut down its retiree health care plan.

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