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The Connecticut Mirror

Connecticut’s legislative session ended with a soft thud last week. There wasn’t quite the mad rush we're used to seeing as the clock ticked down. That means, lawmakers will have to return to the capitol for a special session. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we recap the long session and talk taxes, as business groups and even other states are jumping in with comments on the state's new tax plans.

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General Electric has confirmed it’s formally considering a move out of Connecticut. This comes after the passage of a budget bill that hikes corporate taxes. 

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The Connecticut Republican leadership recapped the 2015 legislative session at the State Capitol on Thursday. House Republican Leader Themis Klarides urged the governor to veto the budget if it wasn't the plan he wanted.

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Governor Dannel Malloy touted accomplishments related to property tax reform and investments in transportation during a press conference on Thursday at the State Capitol, while reporters questioned him repeatedly on his earlier promise not to raise taxes. 

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State Senate Democrats are recapping the 2015 legislative session during a press conference in Senate President Martin Looney's office.

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The Connecticut Senate voted on Wednesday night in favor of a two-year, $40.3 billion Democratic budget. The vote came about a half-hour before the midnight adjournment on Wednesday. 

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Connecticut's House of Representatives passed a $40 billion state budget after Democratic leaders worked through the night to secure enough votes.

The bill, which needed 72 votes, was approved Wednesday morning 73 to 70. It now heads to the Senate, which by law must act on the package by midnight when the General Assembly is scheduled to adjourn for the summer.

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The clock is ticking down on the end of the regular legislative session. It’s that time of the year when reporters and capitol observers try to make sense of what’s happening: what legislation gets passed, what gets killed, and what gets moved to the "budget implementer."

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The new tax obligations Connecticut wants to impose on its corporations are a growing trend around the nation. And some advocates say it’s a movement that’s long overdue.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The former Democratic senator and gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont returns to the show. Ned Lamont recently visited a key and controversial country in world affairs: Iran. We debrief with him about his trip, Middle Eastern affairs, and the world business climate.

Also, on the eve of the end of the legislative session, how does he think the new state budget will affect Connecticut's businesses?

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Democratic legislators appear to be rethinking their final budget plans, after General Electric and Aetna both said they would consider leaving Connecticut if new taxes are instituted. Insurer Travelers also blasted the plans.

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Democratic lawmakers are praising a budget deal that emerged over the weekend with Governor Dannel Malloy. But Republican legislators say they were left out of the talks. 

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The end of the legislative session is drawing near, which means it’s time for Where We Live to check in with some of our state lawmakers. 

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Rank-and-file Connecticut lawmakers will be briefed Monday on a tentative two-year budget agreement reached between Governor Dannel Malloy and the General Assembly's Democrats early Sunday. 

A vote on the latest, proposed $40 billion fiscal package is expected later on Monday. Listen to WNPR's Where We Live for an update from legislators.

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Legislators are weighing in on a proposal by Governor Dannel Malloy to cut funding from the Community Investment Act -- a program established years ago to fund open space and land preservation in the state.

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With a week left in the legislative session environmental watchdogs are keeping close tabs on budget dealings at the state capitol and say, for now at least, things aren't looking as bad as they did a few months ago.

Back-to-back news conferences by Democratic and Republican House leaders, given from the same podium on Thursday, showed a contrast in how both parties are responding to the politics of a deadly train crash that killed at least eight people and injured scores more.

Transportation funding was going to get plenty of attention this week in Washington — even before an Amtrak train derailed about 140 miles to the north.

This is National Infrastructure Week, so lobbyists, labor leaders and activists started swarming Capitol Hill on Monday, seeking funds for roads, bridges and other projects related to transportation.

Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman / Facebook

Governor Dannel Malloy and state Democratic legislative leaders are set to begin their budget talks this week.

Malloy's budget proposal came with big cuts to higher education and social services.  Democratic lawmakers released plans of their own last month, restoring many of those cuts and increasing taxes.

There was no good news for the state from its latest revenue numbers. The Malloy administration’s previous estimates for tax receipts proved optimistic, and an April reality check saw the budget office now projecting a deficit of almost $162 million.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state legislature's Appropriations Committee made it clear this week that it does not want to fund two new charter schools in Connecticut.

Committee co-chair Senator Beth Bye said there are too many other educational programs that need money. So it cut about $21 million from the governor’s proposed budget that was supposed to be used to fund the new charters.

But the owners of the Stamford Charter School for Excellence went ahead and signed a lease anyway.

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Governor Dannel Malloy issued his first veto of the session. The definition of a "spending cap" remains murky. And the former chief-of-staff to a former legislative leader pleads guilty to mail fraud. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, a look at the week's news from across the state, including the lack of a police response report from the Newtown tragedy. Also, a recent audit of the Hartford Police Department shows major problems with the ammunition supply and many questions remain.

We also take a look at the state of campaign finance. It has reached the point where even President Barack Obama is making jokes about it.

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Democratic leaders of the state legislature's Appropriations Committee unveiled their two-year budget Monday.

Connecticut’s fiscal crisis is making strange bedfellows. Two groups usually at opposite ends of the political spectrum came together recently, to ask legislators to think differently about saving for a rainy day. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Republican lawmakers have unveiled an alternate two-year budget that eliminates some of Governor Dannel Malloy's proposed tax hikes, while restoring or scaling back many of the social service and Medicaid cuts proposed in the governor's budget. 

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