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budgets

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

This hour: bridging West Africa’s communication gap. We hear how one Connecticut-based nonprofit is bringing community radio to Senegalese villages. It's something host Lucy Nalpathanchil reported on during her visit to the country late last month. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut lawmakers have wrapped up a challenging legislative session without finalizing a budget, and that means they're already looking ahead to a special session in order to pass a new two-year agreement. Meanwhile, several other issues were settled Wednesday.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

Though they won’t have a budget by the time the regular legislative session comes to an end Wednesday night, Connecticut legislators have debated bills ranging from economic development to highway tolls. 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

There’s always a lot of last-minute action at the state capitol when the legislative session’s about to end. But in the middle of a budgetary crisis - that action has ramped up.

Steve Johnson / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s biggest electric utility is to acquire one of its biggest water suppliers. Eversource has announced a deal to buy Aquarion in a $1.68 billion tie up. 

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

Legislative leaders and Governor Dannel Malloy met on Thursday and agreed to a special session before June 30 to hammer out a new two-year budget. But what does that mean for the rest of the regular legislative session?

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

With one week left in the legislative session, the pressure's on for lawmakers to come up with a budget. This week, Governor Dannel Malloy teamed up with Republican leader Len Fasano to come up with a plan. Malloy wrote a letter to lawmakers on Tuesday morning urging immediate action. 

creative commons

Advocates for the state's low income families say budget proposals to cut the earned income tax credit, or EITC, will have a negative effect on the economy and make the tax code less fair. 

Friends of Hammonasset / Creative Commons

With the unofficial start to summer on Memorial Day weekend, Connecticut legislators are looking at a creative way to save state parks from budget cuts, closures, and restricted services.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

President Donald Trump released his first full budget this week. The proposal greatly reduces funding to entitlement programs, but increases defense spending. At least one lawmaker thinks it could be both good and bad for Connecticut.

Adam Gault/Photodisc / Thinkstock

On Monday, 22 people died and more than two dozen were injured in a horrific terrorist attack at a concert in Manchester, England. President Trump took time out of his whirlwind international tour to respond to the tragedy. "I call them losers because that's what they are," he said, speaking about the ISIS-claimed attackers. "They are losers and we'll have more of them. But they're losers, just remember that."

Mary Anne Williams

Homeowners whose houses are suffering from crumbling foundations say their plight must not be forgotten in the midst of the state's budget crisis. About 500 homes, mostly in the east of the state have been identified as suffering from the problem, which stems from a corrosive mineral mixed into the concrete. But tens of thousands of homes may eventually be affected. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

New Haven is looking for partnerships and outside funding to help improve reading and literacy in the city’s public schools. This follows a new commissioned report, which includes a few costly recommendations.

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

We started this week with revelations that President Trump -- while meeting with Russian officials in the White House -- spilled classified information from a Middle East ally, which we now know to be Israel. This was seen by Israel watchers as a breach of trust, which could endanger its intelligence personnel and increase a threat from Iran,  a close ally to Russia. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy is proposing additional major cuts to state spending in Connecticut as he addresses a widening budget deficit projected for next year. The biggest losers this time around appear to be municipalities: state aid to towns and cities is cut by $600 million. 

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