budgets

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Last week, State Comptroller Kevin Lembo’s office unveiled a plan to end a decades-old backlog of state pension audits. 

A new study challenges the prevailing notion that student debt is the primary reason young adults delay buying a home. The report was co-authored by Dartmouth Sociology Professor Jason Houle and University of Wisconsin Social Work Professor Lawrence Berger. It’s published by Third Way, which describes itself as a centrist think tank.

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Connecticut’s annual sales tax-free shopping week begins on Sunday, but some shoppers might need to plan their purchases carefully to qualify. Only clothing and footwear items under $100 are eligible for tax-free purchase this year; in previous years, items could be up to $300.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s a big year for local politics in Connecticut -- and not just Hartford and Bridgeport.

This hour, we check in on the race for mayor in New London.

As we do on most weeks, we catch you up on other stories from across the state, including how to fund the $100 billion transportation overhaul, MGM's desire to get in on the Connecticut casino expansion battle, and the future of juvenile detention facilities.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Ninety-five people will lose their jobs at the state Department of Labor as Connecticut officials attempt to save $16 million a year in costs.

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The state comptroller says Connecticut is on track to close out the last fiscal year with a $70.9 million budget deficit.

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It’s the middle of summer and for those lucky enough to live in a coastal state, like us here in Connecticut, that means it's beach time! Whether you’re looking for an inexpensive outing with the family, to catch a tan, or simply to get away from the daily grind, beaches offer it all.

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Gov. Dannel Malloy has received the endorsement of the state’s Bond Commission for the first wave of projects in his new transportation initiative. The $24.9 million funding package includes money for both road and public transit projects.

There have been 18 deaths so far this year in the city of Hartford. There were 19 in all of last year, and how to best keep the city safe is a big priority for Mayor Pedro Segarra.

But one of Segarra's chief political challengers is pointing to the baseball stadium the city is building and says the mayor has his priorities all wrong. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It has been a full three weeks since The Wheelhouse was last on the air due to vacations and unexpected absences. That means we have no shortage of news to talk about. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will recap the last three (!?) weeks in news with intrepid reporters who stuck around to cover the special session and all the fallout from the budget implementer. We discuss that at-length on this week's edition of The Wheelhouse.

Office of Governor Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

Business leaders in Connecticut say the changes in the budget implementer bill that passed the General Assembly this week are only a start.

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Connecticut lawmakers passed two bills on Monday aimed at reforming the state's criminal justice system. 

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

The International Monetary Fund confirms that Greece has officially missed a loan payment and is in arrears.

Just hours before Greece was due to make the payment of approximately $1.8 billion dollars, the Greek government asked for a new bailout from countries that use the euro currency.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

State lawmakers will consider rolling back some tax increases they approved earlier this month as they return to the Capitol for a special session.

The session is scheduled for Monday.

Matthew Hester / Creative Commons

As public school enrollment continues to fall in over 70 percent of Connecticut towns, expenses have actually gone up. In fact, of all the states that have declining enrollment, Connecticut’s school spending has increased the most.

A report obtained by NPR paints a bleak portrait of Puerto Rico's economic future, saying its deficit is much larger than previously thought.

"Puerto Rico faces hard times," says the report which was commissioned by the Government Development Bank and written by three former and current International Monetary Fund economists. It is to be released on Monday.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Groups providing services to people with mental health, substance abuse, and developmental disabilities are worried about Governor Dannel Malloy's proposal to make additional spending cuts to Connecticut's new budget in order to roll back business tax increases.

Rob Dozier / WNPR

A coalition of activists and labor unions has written an open letter to General Electric, accusing the corporation of paying no taxes in the state of Connecticut, and commending the legislature for its attempt to increase business taxes in the recent budget bill.

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The state legislature left some work to do after the regular session ended, but it did change the way the car tax is applied across the state. 

Speaking on WNPR's Where We Live, panelists broke down the way the state budget would affect the tax and how complex it appears to be.

The Connecticut Mirror

Connecticut’s legislative session ended with a soft thud last week. There wasn’t quite the mad rush we're used to seeing as the clock ticked down. That means, lawmakers will have to return to the capitol for a special session. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we recap the long session and talk taxes, as business groups and even other states are jumping in with comments on the state's new tax plans.

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General Electric has confirmed it’s formally considering a move out of Connecticut. This comes after the passage of a budget bill that hikes corporate taxes. 

CT-N

The Connecticut Republican leadership recapped the 2015 legislative session at the State Capitol on Thursday. House Republican Leader Themis Klarides urged the governor to veto the budget if it wasn't the plan he wanted.

CT-N

Governor Dannel Malloy touted accomplishments related to property tax reform and investments in transportation during a press conference on Thursday at the State Capitol, while reporters questioned him repeatedly on his earlier promise not to raise taxes. 

CT-N

State Senate Democrats are recapping the 2015 legislative session during a press conference in Senate President Martin Looney's office.

David Wilson / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Senate voted on Wednesday night in favor of a two-year, $40.3 billion Democratic budget. The vote came about a half-hour before the midnight adjournment on Wednesday. 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Connecticut's House of Representatives passed a $40 billion state budget after Democratic leaders worked through the night to secure enough votes.

The bill, which needed 72 votes, was approved Wednesday morning 73 to 70. It now heads to the Senate, which by law must act on the package by midnight when the General Assembly is scheduled to adjourn for the summer.

Lisa Jacobs / Creative Commons

The clock is ticking down on the end of the regular legislative session. It’s that time of the year when reporters and capitol observers try to make sense of what’s happening: what legislation gets passed, what gets killed, and what gets moved to the "budget implementer."

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The new tax obligations Connecticut wants to impose on its corporations are a growing trend around the nation. And some advocates say it’s a movement that’s long overdue.

Chion Wolf

The former Democratic senator and gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont returns to the show. Ned Lamont recently visited a key and controversial country in world affairs: Iran. We debrief with him about his trip, Middle Eastern affairs, and the world business climate.

Also, on the eve of the end of the legislative session, how does he think the new state budget will affect Connecticut's businesses?

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Democratic legislators appear to be rethinking their final budget plans, after General Electric and Aetna both said they would consider leaving Connecticut if new taxes are instituted. Insurer Travelers also blasted the plans.

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