WNPR

Boston

A man named Eddie threads through the mid-afternoon crowd in Cambridge’s Central Square. He’s headed for a sandwich shop, the first stop on a tour of public bathrooms available for drug use. Eddie, whose last name we’re not including because he uses illegal drugs, knows which restrooms on Mass. Ave. he can enter, on what terms, at what hours and for how long.

Tim Pierce / Creative Commons

It’s morning on the East Coast, but it’s late afternoon in Iran, and Mohsen Hosseini is en route to the airport for a flight to the United States — or so he hopes. 

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

They began Saturday as a series of pop-up demonstrations outside several major airports. But by Sunday, the protests against President Trump's temporary immigration freeze had leapt from those airports to squares and plazas in cities across the U.S.

Outside the White House, in Boston's Copley Square and Battery Park in New York City, immigrant advocacy groups have organized protests to register their discontent with the executive order Trump signed Friday.

Emmanuel Huybrechts / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s declining jobs numbers in recent months have made the contrast with its New England neighbors even more stark. While the Nutmeg State has yet to regain all the jobs it lost in the great recession, Massachusetts is seemingly booming. 

The city of Boston has a lot of work to do to truly address its racial divisions — that’s a clear sentiment that emerged from many people taking part in the opening session of a city-wide dialogue on race organized by Mayor Marty Walsh.

A multi-racial crowd of close to 1,000 people turned out for the first session on Saturday.

For 19-year-old Nate McLean-Nichols, the police’s treatment of young African American men is his number one racial priority.

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