books

Drunk Tank Pink

May 16, 2013
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Today: The way the thoughts we have and the decisions we make are influenced by forces that aren't always in our control.

stevecoutts on Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to this quote: "I have just ... paid a depressing visit to an electronic computer which can write sonnets if fed with the right material... I have a feeling that by Christmas it will have written its first novel, and possibly by next Christmas novel sets will be on sale at Woolworths and you will all be able to buy them, and write your own." That was the writer Lawrence Durrell issuing a gloomy forecast, 50 years ago.

stevecoutts on Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to this quote: "I have just ... paid a depressing visit to an electronic computer which can write sonnets if fed with the right material... I have a feeling that by Christmas it will have written its first novel, and possibly by next Christmas novel sets will be on sale at Woolworths and you will all be able to buy them, and write your own." That was the writer Lawrence Durrell issuing a gloomy forecast, 50 years ago.

Ginny/flickr creative commons

The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

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The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

Love 2.0

Apr 30, 2013
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Catie Talarski

Libraries might be changing faster than just about any other part of public life. These civic institutions were known for more than a century for their voluminous stacks of books and quiet spaces - now, they’re all about public events, high-tech connectivity, even 3-D printing!

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What is time?

Padraic/flickr creative commons

We'll get you in the mood to explore our state with the author of Insiders' Guide to Connecticut, the best state guide on the market. It's pure pleasure cover to cover. And we'll send the book to your door.

Flickr Creative Commons, daveparker

Two possible meaningful personal stories.

Lawn Gone!

Apr 22, 2013
Ian T. McFarland/flickr creative commons

We'll look at the basics of replacing a traditional lawn with a wide variety of easy-care, no-mow, drought-tolerant, money-saving options that will appeal to today's busy, eco-conscious homeowner. Whether you’re a beginner or expert gardener, green thumb or black, Pam Penick's Lawn Gone! provides realistic choices, achievable plans, and simple instructions for renovating your yard from start to finish.

Hey Paul Studios on Flickr Creative Commons

frostnova/flickr creative commons

Connecticut launches it's first barn trail complete with an iPhone app. Helen Higgins, from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, walks us through the process of how the barns are chosen and what the trail has to offer.

Take a Deep Breath: Clear the Air for the Health of Your Childby Nina L. Shapiro

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The Huffington Post calls Ann Leary’s new New York Times bestselling novel, “A sophisticated turn on guilty-pleasure reading that is so well-written it won't make you feel guilty after all, except maybe about reaching for that third glass of pinot noir.” Leary joins us to talk about The Good House.

Flickr Creative Commons, shutterhacks

Today you will meet two poets and one novelist, all women, all fascinating, all appearing around here in the next three days. 

Predictive Health

Apr 9, 2013
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Troy David Johnston/flickr creative commons

Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor recommended to deadly. We used to think the Earth was the center of the universe and that Pluto was a planet. For decades, we were convinced that the brontosaurus was a real dinosaur. In short, what we know about the world is constantly changing. But it turns out there’s an order to the state of knowledge, an explanation for how we know what we know. Samuel Arbesman is an expert in the field of scientometrics—literally the science of science, and he’ll join us to look at The Half-Life of Facts.

Barbara Wells/flickr creative commons

Is Martha Stewart History?

Apr 5, 2013

With over thirty books published and millions of magazines devoured by fans eager to organize their homes, prepare delicious meals, and simply be crafty, Martha Stewart has become known as the most successful modern domestic advisor in the United States.  But domestic advice of the kind Stewart doles out in her television appearances, print, and internet publications is not something new.  Domestic advisors have long had a place in America’s kitchens and homes and have been providing women with guidance on how to manage their homes and cook appropriate meals for hundreds of years. 

Chion Wolf file photo

Being a teenager has never been easy, but in recent years, with the rise of the Internet and social media, it has become exponentially more challenging. Bullying, once thought of as the province of queen bees and goons, has taken on new, complex, and insidious forms, as parents and educators know all too well. Slate’s Emily Bazelon, author of Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy, joins Faith in studio to talk about bullying in the 21st century.

Here are some of the magazine's I've written for: Mirabella, Men’s Health, Mademoiselle, Best Life, Verge ...

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The heart has consistently captured the human imagination. It has been singled out as a cultural icon, the repository of our deepest religious and artistic impulses, the organ whose steady functioning is understood, both literally and symbolically, as the very life force itself. The Sublime Engine: A Biography of the Human Heart explores the profound sense of awe every person feels when they ponder the miracle encased within their ribs. Author Stephen Amidon and Yale cardiologist Sandip Mukherjee join us to examine this most vital of organs.

A Look at War

Mar 25, 2013
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As we approach its tenth anniversary, we’ll talk to two veterans of the Iraq war. Brian Castner served three tours of duty in the Middle East, two of them as the commander of an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit in Iraq. His book, The Long Walk, chronicles his ‘story of war and the life that follows.’ When veteran Kevin Powers returned from Iraq, he turned his experiences there into The Yellow Birds, a novel about two young privates trying to stay alive at war. Castner and Powers join us for the full hour.

Chion Wolf

You can't make this stuff up. The Beecher family was at the forefront of every important reform movement of the late 19th century. Abolition. Education. Temperance. Women's suffrage.

Underlying that was a streak of untameable craziness, especially as incarnated by Henry Ward Beecher. Beecher was a pastor and a rock star orator. He was also, one would have to conclude, a little bit out of control on the sexual front.

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The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

Windham Campbell Prizes logo

Yale University announced the winner of its inaugural Windham Campbell literature prizes. The award was established by a gift from the estate of writer Donald Windham and his partner Sandy M. Campbell. 

The nine recipients each received $150,000. The fiction winners were James Salter, Zoë Wicomb, and Tom McCarthy.

Naomi Wallace, Stephen Adly Guirgis, and Tarell Alvin McCraney were recognized for their work in drama.

The non-fiction prizes were awarded to Jonny Steinberg, Adina Hoffman, and Jeremy Scahill.

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The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

Creative Commons

Today we’ll talk with our exploration expert, Michael Robinson of the University of Hartford. He’s written about the great arctic explorers of the past, but his new book has him on his own voyage to the tops of giant mountains in Uganda, searching for a fabled “Lost White Tribe.” His book Lost White Tribe: Explorers, Scientists and a Theory of Race that Changed Africa will be out in 2015.    

Robinson will be speaking about his research Monday February 25th at 1:30PM. 

shutterhacks/flickr creative commons

The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

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