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"The Cat in the Hat comes back" to Springfield and he’s bringing a few of his friends. Yertle the Turtle, Horton, the Lorax -- all can be found at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss, a museum honoring the life and legacy of children’s author Theodor Geisel. 

Douglas Fernandes / Creative Commons

There's a set of steps and a big stone fireplace sitting in the middle of the woods where I used to walk my dog. I can envision the family living in the house that was part of the neighborhood that got washed away when the Farmington River overflowed its banks in 1955.  My exploration led me to the origin of those steps. 

Derek Σωκράτης Finch / flickr creative commons

So, it turns out the world didn't end last week. Or the week before that. Or the week before that.

And while it might seem like the events of the last year or so are the disease, maybe they're really just the symptoms; maybe they're really just signs of the dystopia around us.

But, then: Which dystopia?

Amazon

"I Love Dick" is Jill Soloway's second TV series for Amazon, after "Transparent." It's based on Chris Kraus's seminal feminist novel from the 1990s and stars Kevin Bacon as the titular character. Rolling Stone has called the show "the high-lit cowboy-lust TV show you need." The Nose weighs in.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we rebroadcast our audio tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

Mike Roberts / Creative Commons

There's a quote by journalist Ned Resnikoff in Brooke Gladstone's latest book, The Trouble With Reality: A Rumination on Moral Panic in Our Time. It's one of many quotes she cites that guide her through a meditation on whether the election of Donald Trump signals the worst existential crisis we've known.

Wikimedia Commons

There has been a surge of interest in the writings of Ayn Rand in the last decade, including from Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, President Donald Trump and several members of his cabinet.

Hulu

Margaret Atwood started writing her classic dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale in 1984. She set it in an imagined future America where the toxic environment has limited human fertility, a theocratic dictatorship has taken control, and women have been stripped of their rights. Atwood said the novel isn't a prediction, but the internet thinks Hulu's new TV version is.

Netflix

"13 Reasons Why" is the new Netflix series based on Jay Asher's book. In it, one of the main characters, a teenager, has killed herself before the narrative begins. As such, the show has been called, for one thing, "dangerous." The Nose weighs in.

Vector Portal / Creative Commons

Al Capone told everyone who asked him what he did for a living that he was a "property owner and taxpayer in Chicago." He was really a powerful multimillionaire in 1920s Chicago who made money from the illegal sale of alcohol during Prohibition and the vices that usually accompanied it: gambling and prostitution.

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

President Trump's budget blueprint is all about "hard power" — increasing the country's military might by slashing foreign aid. The proposed cuts are in contrast to the dramatic boost to foreign aid under President George W. Bush.

Lori Mack/WNPR

The Big Read is returning to New Haven. The International Festival of Arts and Ideas, in partnership with the New Haven Free Public Library, announced the citywide literary program at City Hall. 

Christopher / flickr creative commons

This month, the nation turns its eyes to basketball, to college basketball, to its annual March Madness tournament.

But... not quite all of the nation.

Some of the nation is, well, nerdier than that.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We couldn’t let March come to a close without recognizing that it’s Women’s History Month.

This hour, we honor the occasion with tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

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