architecture

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

massdesigngroup.org

“Social” or “public-interest” design is working in high-risk neighborhoods all over the country, proving that thoughtful, community-involved design ideas really can address a community’s critical issues and needs. Architect Bryan Bell says, “Never before have so many of the world’s problems been as accessible to design solutions.” He founded Design Corps, where he trains architects to use their skills to address social problems. 

Chion Wolf

I've been writing a newspaper column for The Hartford Courant since 1982. For my first 15 years or so, I tended to write the column at The Hartford Courant. In the last ten years, I have written columns in the following places: a sports bar in San Francisco; a boat moving along the Rhine; the famous Brasserie Balzar in Paris; an outdoor clearing in the Yucatan jungle where, bizarrely, there was WiFi; and a living room in Kobe, Japan.

cmglee / Creative Commons

We're working on a show about whether work is the best place to do work. So we're nosy interested in how you feel about the physical spaces at your job. 

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in 2oth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

Inside A Green Building

Apr 26, 2013
Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Alan Walker (Wikimedia Commons)

Connecticut Light and Power is stringing new transmission lines in the Waterford area this week, but instead of the usual method of stringing the cable from the ground, helicopters will swoop down and do the job.

Joining us to talk about this is Frank Poirot, a spokesman for CL&P's parent company, Northeast Utilities.

A release from CL&P states that the helicopter method saves time, and Poirot added that it also spares the surrounding natural environment from some wear and tear.

Daniel Guimarães/flickr creative commons

The director of the Yale Center for Sleep Medicine offers tips on problem sleep. How to build the inside of your house if someone else has completed the outside framing. And inspiring stories from young people with plans for innovative start-ups.

Discussing "Pocket Neighborhoods" in New Haven

Jul 20, 2012

The economy and environmental concerns are slowly reversing the trend of suburban sprawl and embracing concepts such as pocket neighborhoods – or groups of smaller houses clustered around a shared space, like a park or community garden. An architect who has revived the concept in the past 20 years shared his views in New Haven last night.

Daniel Guimarães/flickr creative commons

The director of the Yale Center for Sleep Medicine offers tips on problem sleep. How to build the inside of your house if someone else has completed the outside framing. And inspiring stories from young people with plans for innovative start-ups.

Andrés Monroy-Hernández/flickr creative commons

Occupy New Haven protestors save the encampment on the Green for another two weeks, but not without an interesting twist. Paul Bass, from the New Haven Independent, has the story as it unfolds.

Architect Mark Simon, from the award winning architectural firm Centerbrook Architects, talks about thinking in three dimensions and how technology has changed the industry.

The Best Care Possible: A Physician's Quest to Transform Care Through the End of Life

Crossing The Bridge

Mar 1, 2012
Russ Glasson (Flickr Creative Commons)

In the nearly five years since a tragic bridge collapse in Minnesota, the nation’s bridges have been under scrutiny.

And a national overview shows that 11.5% of the country’s bridges are “structurally deficient.” But what does that mean exactly? Are they in danger of falling apart, like the span over I-35 in Minneapolis, or the Mianus River Bridge on I-95 that killed motorists in Connecticut in 1983?

Jay Zhang (Flickr Creative Commons)

A hundred years ago, the tallest building in the world was 700 feet. Today, the record is 2,000 feet taller than that...and this trend isn’t slowing down. Skyscrapers have gone from being merely “tall” to “supertall.” Seven of the world’s ten tallest skyscrapers were built since the turn of the millennium.

The Urban Metabolism

Jan 31, 2012
compujeramey

Having a “high metabolism” is seen as a positive for humans...what about cities?

The idea of “urban metabolism” comes from a new book by Austin Troy, associate professor at the University of Vermont’s Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources.  He’s the author of The Very Hungry City: Urban Energy Efficiency and the Economic Fate of Cities

Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects

The modernist architectural team of Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel used art as an inspiration throughout their long collaboration, which produced many acclaimed public buildings and private residences until Gwathmey’s death in 2009.

The inspiration they drew from art forms the basis of an exhibit of their work on display at the Yale School of Architecture Gallery - until January 27th.  

Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects

The modernist architectural team of Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel used art as an inspiration throughout their long collaboration, which produced many acclaimed public buildings and private residences until Gwathmey’s death in 2009.

The inspiration they drew from art forms the basis of an exhibit of their work on display at the Yale School of Architecture Gallery - until January 27th.  

Architecture In The Public Interest

Jul 25, 2011
Philippe AMIOT, creative commons

What if the blueprints to the next great American building were released to the public and it was designed collaboratively?

That’s a far cry from the “individualistic” approach in the iconic novel, “The Fountainhead.”  

This new idea suggests all of us might have something to contribute to Architecture.  It’s called “Open Source Architecture” and it’s based on an inclusive approach to the profession.

Olmsted's Legacy

Jul 8, 2011
creative commons

Garrett Wade

One of America's most talented modernist architects, Deborah Berke, who teaches at Yale, and does homes and commercial buildings across the world. She walks us through the process of designing a home that is also a work of art. Plus, green cleaning products, and the Yale Peabody Museum's latest exhibit: Invasion of the Bloodsuckers.

Memorials

May 31, 2011
karu101, Creative Commons

Connecticut is host to hundreds of war memorials and monuments dating back all the way back to the Civil War.

These memorials are usually very literal - depictions of heroic figures or commemorations of the war dead.  Or, they are truly monumental - points of civic pride meant to be gathering places for the community.

But over time, memorials have grown increasingly conceptual and abstract, and are often a touchstone for controversy

Keith Scott Morton

The publications inform and inspire readers with original place-based features, architecture and art, including insider views of local real estate transactions, original articles featuring photos of local homes and gardens, entertaining and the good life. The award-winning magazines are oversized and designed to emphasize superior journalism and photography, all written to the highest national standards and inspired by a local sense of place.

 

Front Street in Court

Feb 8, 2011
Jeff Cohen/WNPR

The retail development known as Front Street in Hartford is finally built and looking for tenants.  But the project took years to materialize, and now it's in court.

Front Street is a publicly-subsidized development that was geared to attract area people to downtown Hartford and the adjacent Connecticut Convention Center.  Here’s how George Royster puts it. He's an attorney for the state:

“Because people coming to Hartford with no place to go would not be likely to return to the convention center or the hotel if they had no entertainment or retail or places to eat.”

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