architecture

tsaiproject / Creative Commons

If you watch "House of Cards," you might have noticed a main storyline about a bridge from Long Island to Connecticut. Sounds crazy, right? Well, here's the thing: it was a real idea!

From bridges, to highways, to malls, Where We Live takes a look at some outlandish project ideas that -- for some reason or another -- just never worked. Why isn’t there a bridge connecting Connecticut and Long Island? And why wasn't the New Haven Galleria mall ever built?

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The U.S. Coast Guard broke ground for its new museum in the City of New London. It will be the first museum honoring the Coast Guard in the nation.

ctfastrak.com

Connecticut is to invest millions of dollars in an attempt to spur economic development along the route of the New Britain to Hartford busway, and the New Haven to Springfield rail line.

tsaiproject / Creative Commons

If you watch "House of Cards," you might have noticed a main storyline about a bridge from Long Island to Connecticut. Sounds crazy, right? Well, here's the thing: it was a real idea!

From bridges, to highways, to malls, Where We Live takes a look at some outlandish project ideas that -- for some reason or another -- just never worked. Why isn’t there a bridge connecting Connecticut and Long Island? And why wasn't the New Haven Galleria mall ever built?

Will Sochi Olympics Architecture Win Gold?

Feb 6, 2014

The Olympics start today, and one thing viewers are excited to see that isn’t an event is the architecture of the facilities. At a price tag of $50 billion, they are the most expensive games in history. The president of the Sochi chapter of the Union of Russian Architects says the city has been transformed.

This is the first Winter Games designed as part of a master plan, but with stories of two toilets in a stall, and facilities for previous Olympics around the world going unused, what will be the legacy of the buildings at Sochi?

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Yale School of Management has moved into its new home, Edward P. Evans Hall. The huge glass palace on Whitney Avenue is an architectural landmark for New Haven, but it's also attracted some controversy.

This little house is looking for a home.

In the past five years, 600 single-family homes have been demolished in Arlington, Va., many to make way for larger houses, according to a preservation group. One architectural firm is so determined to save one 1920s Sears kit house from demolition, it's giving the house away for free. But there's a catch: the buyer would need to pay to move it to a new location.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

In old cities with old housing, blight is a constant concern. Now, Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is boosting a program to give residents money to fix up their homes. 

CPTV

The first time you laid eyes on it, the sheer size tended to rip your vocabulary away from you. It was so damn big -- 2.4 acres! -- and the bulk of it just sagged into the middle, right on top of the space that you knew was designed for thousands of people to sit in. 

CPTV

For many years, Ralph Nader has pushed the idea of an American Museum of Tort History which would be located somewhere in Connecticut, probably Winsted. The exhibits would concern tort cases from all over the U.S. but you have to think the Hartford Civic Center roof collapse would merit a special diorama.

One World Trade Center — the skyscraper that now rises from the site of the Twin Towers, destroyed during the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11 — has been declared the tallest building in the U.S. by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Coming in at 1,776 feet tall, the World Trade Center beat out the Willis Tower in Chicago. At issue was whether a 408-foot needle that sits atop the New York building was an architectural top or a removable radio antenna. If it had been deemed an antenna, the honor would have gone to Chicago.

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

massdesigngroup.org

“Social” or “public-interest” design is working in high-risk neighborhoods all over the country, proving that thoughtful, community-involved design ideas really can address a community’s critical issues and needs. Architect Bryan Bell says, “Never before have so many of the world’s problems been as accessible to design solutions.” He founded Design Corps, where he trains architects to use their skills to address social problems. 

Chion Wolf

I've been writing a newspaper column for The Hartford Courant since 1982. For my first 15 years or so, I tended to write the column at The Hartford Courant. In the last ten years, I have written columns in the following places: a sports bar in San Francisco; a boat moving along the Rhine; the famous Brasserie Balzar in Paris; an outdoor clearing in the Yucatan jungle where, bizarrely, there was WiFi; and a living room in Kobe, Japan.

cmglee / Creative Commons

We're working on a show about whether work is the best place to do work. So we're nosy interested in how you feel about the physical spaces at your job. 

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in 2oth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

Inside A Green Building

Apr 26, 2013
Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Alan Walker (Wikimedia Commons)

Connecticut Light and Power is stringing new transmission lines in the Waterford area this week, but instead of the usual method of stringing the cable from the ground, helicopters will swoop down and do the job.

Joining us to talk about this is Frank Poirot, a spokesman for CL&P's parent company, Northeast Utilities.

A release from CL&P states that the helicopter method saves time, and Poirot added that it also spares the surrounding natural environment from some wear and tear.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 59

Sep 23, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

"That's meaning of life isn't it - trying to find a place for your stuff." George Carlin. The man is a genius.

Our family downsized about three years ago, and, after we donated/sold/pitched out box after box of junk, it occurred to me that "stuff" might be a good topic for the Guide. I invited my architect pal Duo Dickinson, fellow downsizer Mary Eliott, basement flood refugee Gaye Hyre and professional organizer Lisa Lelas to join me for a conversation on the subject.

Daniel Guimarães/flickr creative commons

The director of the Yale Center for Sleep Medicine offers tips on problem sleep. How to build the inside of your house if someone else has completed the outside framing. And inspiring stories from young people with plans for innovative start-ups.

Discussing "Pocket Neighborhoods" in New Haven

Jul 20, 2012

The economy and environmental concerns are slowly reversing the trend of suburban sprawl and embracing concepts such as pocket neighborhoods – or groups of smaller houses clustered around a shared space, like a park or community garden. An architect who has revived the concept in the past 20 years shared his views in New Haven last night.

Gothic Connecticut

May 24, 2012

Pre-eminent as a building style during the 1800s, Gothic Revival architecture is often overlooked today.  Henry Austin, Ithiel Town, and Alexander Jackson Davis, three of the most important American architects working in the Gothic style, all designed significant buildings in Connecticut.

Daniel Guimarães/flickr creative commons

The director of the Yale Center for Sleep Medicine offers tips on problem sleep. How to build the inside of your house if someone else has completed the outside framing. And inspiring stories from young people with plans for innovative start-ups.

Andrés Monroy-Hernández/flickr creative commons

Occupy New Haven protestors save the encampment on the Green for another two weeks, but not without an interesting twist. Paul Bass, from the New Haven Independent, has the story as it unfolds.

Architect Mark Simon, from the award winning architectural firm Centerbrook Architects, talks about thinking in three dimensions and how technology has changed the industry.

The Best Care Possible: A Physician's Quest to Transform Care Through the End of Life

Crossing The Bridge

Mar 1, 2012
Russ Glasson (Flickr Creative Commons)

In the nearly five years since a tragic bridge collapse in Minnesota, the nation’s bridges have been under scrutiny.

And a national overview shows that 11.5% of the country’s bridges are “structurally deficient.” But what does that mean exactly? Are they in danger of falling apart, like the span over I-35 in Minneapolis, or the Mianus River Bridge on I-95 that killed motorists in Connecticut in 1983?

Jay Zhang (Flickr Creative Commons)

A hundred years ago, the tallest building in the world was 700 feet. Today, the record is 2,000 feet taller than that...and this trend isn’t slowing down. Skyscrapers have gone from being merely “tall” to “supertall.” Seven of the world’s ten tallest skyscrapers were built since the turn of the millennium.

The Urban Metabolism

Jan 31, 2012
compujeramey

Having a “high metabolism” is seen as a positive for humans...what about cities?

The idea of “urban metabolism” comes from a new book by Austin Troy, associate professor at the University of Vermont’s Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources.  He’s the author of The Very Hungry City: Urban Energy Efficiency and the Economic Fate of Cities

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