architecture

The Colin McEnroe Show
10:56 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Dancin' In the Moonlight: Connecticut Dance Halls

David Foster is the owner of Shaboo Productions and the leader of the Mohegan Sun Shaboo All-Stars
Chion Wolf

Today, we talk about two Connecticut dance halls, each springing from the vision of two very different men who took their respective dance halls down very different paths. One's dream soared, bringing thousands of concert-goers to over 3,000 acts over an 11-year history. The other's dream stalled, his elaborate dance hall sitting idle for decades.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon September 29, 2014

From Suburbs to Cities: Design for a Better Future

Norman Garrick.
Chion Wolf WNPR

In her first book The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving, author Leigh Gallagher observes a growing trend in America’s housing landscape: fewer people are choosing to live in suburbs. This hour, Leigh joins us to explain some of the forces driving Americans out of suburbia, and give us a glimpse of what the post-cul-de-sac future might look like.

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Newtown
2:37 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Design After Disaster: a New Sandy Hook School

Courtyard Perspective - "The projected 506 students will be distributed between three classroom wings, two of which are 2-stories, which extend like fingers of an open hand on the site."
Svigals + Partners Architects

The New Haven based  Svigals + Partners Architects have the challenging job of rebuilding Sandy Hook Elementary School, where 26 children and educators were murdered in December 2012. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Response, Relief, and Rebuilding in the Wake of Disaster

The aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.
Wavian Creative Commons

September 11, 2001 changed a lot about America, including many changes that, by now, you barely notice. So did the Hurricanes and tropical storms --Katrina, Irene, and Sandy -- all of which reshaped how and where we live.

The shooting spree that left 26 dead at Sandy Hook Elementary school was the most focused of tragedies, but we’re still adapting and coming to terms with what that disaster means to us.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri August 15, 2014

From Suburbs to Cities: Design for a Better Future

Norman Garrick.
Chion Wolf WNPR

In her first book The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving, author Leigh Gallagher observes a growing trend in America’s housing landscape: fewer people are choosing to live in suburbs. This hour, Leigh joins us to explain some of the forces driving Americans out of suburbia, and give us a glimpse of what the post-cul-de-sac future might look like.

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Designing for Health
10:28 am
Mon August 4, 2014

One Step To Combat Obesity: Make Stairs More Attractive

TK
Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 12:12 pm

If there's a single invention that helped shape New York City, literally, it might be the elevator. Along with steel frame construction, the elevator allowed New York City to grow up.

But according to architect David Burney, former New York City commissioner of the Department of Design and Construction, it's time to celebrate the steps.

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Capitol History
4:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

Interns who host tours on Capitol Hill, stopping at sites like the small Senate rotunda, don't always have their facts straight.
The Architect of the Capitol

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 11:04 pm

Every summer thousands of interns flood the offices of Capitol Hill. One of their primary duties is to give constituents tours of the famous buildings. They parade visitors from the rotunda to statuary hall, offering stories and anecdotes.

But while these intern tours provide a great deal of information, they are sometimes a little short on actual history.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue July 8, 2014

The Design of Workspaces Past, Present, and Future

Tony Amenta.
Chion Wolf WNPR

From the nineteenth century “counting house” to the modern-day cubicle, the layout of our workspaces has undergone some pretty radical changes over the years.

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Olmsted Legacy
7:16 am
Thu June 26, 2014

New Documentary Highlights the Work of Frederick Law Olmsted

A bird's eye view of Central Park in New York.
PBS

Frederick Law Olmsted, recognized as one of the greatest landscape architects from the U.S., is perhaps best known for contributing to the design of New York City's Central Park. He was also a Connecticut native, and was raised in Hartford's North End -- where he is also interred, in Old North Cemetery.

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Downtown Campus
2:13 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

UConn, City of Hartford Mark Development Agreement

The former Hartford Times building on Prospect Street will be refurbished and incorporated into a UConn Hartford campus.
Peter Morenus UConn

UConn officials and the city of Hartford marked a development agreement milestone on Tuesday. The university is capping an effort to move its West Hartford campus to a new location called UConn Hartford.

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Office Design
2:05 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

How a Well-Designed Doctor's Office Could Help Patients

Will doctor's offices look more like this in the near future? Some say the natural design elements can help patients.
John Bartelstone Jeffrey Berman Architect

Doctor's offices and hospitals may not always be stunning examples of architecture, but both architects and doctors are thinking of how designs can put patients at ease and help them heal.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Big Ideas (That Didn't Work)

Fire Island Inlet Bridge (part of the Robert Moses Causeway).
Credit tsaiproject / Creative Commons

If you watch "House of Cards," you might have noticed a main storyline about a bridge from Long Island to Connecticut. Sounds crazy, right? Well, here's the thing: it was a real idea!

From bridges, to highways, to malls, Where We Live takes a look at some outlandish project ideas that -- for some reason or another -- just never worked. Why isn’t there a bridge connecting Connecticut and Long Island? And why wasn't the New Haven Galleria mall ever built?

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Honoring Veterans
7:01 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Coast Guard Breaks Ground in New London For National Museum

The Coast Guard Barque Eagle docked in New London for the groundbreaking ceremony.
Harriet Jones WNPR

The U.S. Coast Guard broke ground for its new museum in the City of New London. It will be the first museum honoring the Coast Guard in the nation.

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Jumpstarts
1:28 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Connecticut Invests in Transit-Oriented Development to Expand Jobs, Education Access

A rendering of the New Britain busway station for CTfastrak.
ctfastrak.com

Connecticut is to invest millions of dollars in an attempt to spur economic development along the route of the New Britain to Hartford busway, and the New Haven to Springfield rail line.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Big Ideas (That Didn't Work)

Fire Island Inlet Bridge (part of the Robert Moses Causeway).
Credit tsaiproject / Creative Commons

If you watch "House of Cards," you might have noticed a main storyline about a bridge from Long Island to Connecticut. Sounds crazy, right? Well, here's the thing: it was a real idea!

From bridges, to highways, to malls, Where We Live takes a look at some outlandish project ideas that -- for some reason or another -- just never worked. Why isn’t there a bridge connecting Connecticut and Long Island? And why wasn't the New Haven Galleria mall ever built?

Read more
Winter Olympics
4:16 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Will Sochi Olympics Architecture Win Gold?

Fisht Olympic Stadium is pictured in the new Sochi Olympic Park. (Courtesy of Populous)

The Olympics start today, and one thing viewers are excited to see that isn’t an event is the architecture of the facilities. At a price tag of $50 billion, they are the most expensive games in history. The president of the Sochi chapter of the Union of Russian Architects says the city has been transformed.

This is the first Winter Games designed as part of a master plan, but with stories of two toilets in a stall, and facilities for previous Olympics around the world going unused, what will be the legacy of the buildings at Sochi?

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New Haven
9:15 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Yale School of Management Opens Its New Building

Edward P. Evans Hall sits on New Haven's Whitney Avenue.
Harriet Jones WNPR

Yale School of Management has moved into its new home, Edward P. Evans Hall. The huge glass palace on Whitney Avenue is an architectural landmark for New Haven, but it's also attracted some controversy.

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Architecture
5:25 am
Sat January 11, 2014

Historic House Is Yours Free, But There's A Catch

Architects at Paolasquare International are giving away this historic house in Arlington, Va. for free.
Sarah L. Voisin The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 11, 2014 12:53 pm

This little house is looking for a home.

In the past five years, 600 single-family homes have been demolished in Arlington, Va., many to make way for larger houses, according to a preservation group. One architectural firm is so determined to save one 1920s Sears kit house from demolition, it's giving the house away for free. But there's a catch: the buyer would need to pay to move it to a new location.

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These Old Houses
3:29 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Trying to Tackle Blight in Hartford

Mayor Pedro Segarra stands with city staff in front of a recently revamped home.
Credit Jeff Cohen / WNPR

In old cities with old housing, blight is a constant concern. Now, Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is boosting a program to give residents money to fix up their homes. 

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Host's Diary
12:16 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

"Holy [Bleep]!" Memories of the Hartford Civic Center Roof Collapse

Credit CPTV

The first time you laid eyes on it, the sheer size tended to rip your vocabulary away from you. It was so damn big -- 2.4 acres! -- and the bulk of it just sagged into the middle, right on top of the space that you knew was designed for thousands of people to sit in. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:29 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Remembering the Collapse of the Hartford Civic Center Roof

The collapse of the Hartford Civic Center roof in January 1978.
Credit CPTV

For many years, Ralph Nader has pushed the idea of an American Museum of Tort History which would be located somewhere in Connecticut, probably Winsted. The exhibits would concern tort cases from all over the U.S. but you have to think the Hartford Civic Center roof collapse would merit a special diorama.

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New York over Chicago
11:46 am
Tue November 12, 2013

New York's One World Trade Center Declared Tallest Building In U.S.

The world's tallest buildings by architectural top.
CTBUH

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:02 pm

One World Trade Center — the skyscraper that now rises from the site of the Twin Towers, destroyed during the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11 — has been declared the tallest building in the U.S. by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Coming in at 1,776 feet tall, the World Trade Center beat out the Willis Tower in Chicago. At issue was whether a 408-foot needle that sits atop the New York building was an architectural top or a removable radio antenna. If it had been deemed an antenna, the honor would have gone to Chicago.

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Architecture
3:03 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Size Does Matter, At Least In The Tallest Building Debate

The view from the Willis Tower, formerly known as Sears Tower, in Chicago.
FleishmanHillard

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:20 pm

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

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Where We Live
12:00 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Solving Social Problems Using Public-Interest Design

Butaro Hospital in Rwanda was designed by Michael Murphy, former Harvard architecture student, and now CEO of MASS Design Group
Credit massdesigngroup.org

“Social” or “public-interest” design is working in high-risk neighborhoods all over the country, proving that thoughtful, community-involved design ideas really can address a community’s critical issues and needs. Architect Bryan Bell says, “Never before have so many of the world’s problems been as accessible to design solutions.” He founded Design Corps, where he trains architects to use their skills to address social problems. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
4:10 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Is Work the Best Place to Work?

David Arai is the president of Maier Design Group
Chion Wolf

I've been writing a newspaper column for The Hartford Courant since 1982. For my first 15 years or so, I tended to write the column at The Hartford Courant. In the last ten years, I have written columns in the following places: a sports bar in San Francisco; a boat moving along the Rhine; the famous Brasserie Balzar in Paris; an outdoor clearing in the Yucatan jungle where, bizarrely, there was WiFi; and a living room in Kobe, Japan.

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Host's Diary
5:24 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

What's the Physical Space Like Where You Work?

Depressing Cambridge University cubicles.
Credit cmglee / Creative Commons

We're working on a show about whether work is the best place to do work. So we're nosy interested in how you feel about the physical spaces at your job. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:57 am
Mon June 17, 2013

A. M. Homes, Jeanne Marie Laskas, and a Look at Long Island Modernism

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:57 am
Mon June 17, 2013

A.M. Homes, Jeanne Marie Laskas, and a Look at Long Island Modernism

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in 2oth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

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News
9:21 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Inside A Green Building

Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

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Connecticut
9:21 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Inside A Green Building

Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

Read more

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