architecture

Where We Live
8:40 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Big Ideas (That Didn't Work)

Fire Island Inlet Bridge (part of the Robert Moses Causeway).
Credit tsaiproject / Creative Commons

If you watch "House of Cards," you might have noticed a main storyline about a bridge from Long Island to Connecticut. Sounds crazy, right? Well, here's the thing: it was a real idea!

From bridges, to highways, to malls, Where We Live takes a look at some outlandish project ideas that -- for some reason or another -- just never worked. Why isn’t there a bridge connecting Connecticut and Long Island? And why wasn't the New Haven Galleria mall ever built?

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Winter Olympics
4:16 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Will Sochi Olympics Architecture Win Gold?

Fisht Olympic Stadium is pictured in the new Sochi Olympic Park. (Courtesy of Populous)

The Olympics start today, and one thing viewers are excited to see that isn’t an event is the architecture of the facilities. At a price tag of $50 billion, they are the most expensive games in history. The president of the Sochi chapter of the Union of Russian Architects says the city has been transformed.

This is the first Winter Games designed as part of a master plan, but with stories of two toilets in a stall, and facilities for previous Olympics around the world going unused, what will be the legacy of the buildings at Sochi?

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New Haven
9:15 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Yale School of Management Opens Its New Building

Edward P. Evans Hall sits on New Haven's Whitney Avenue.
Harriet Jones WNPR

Yale School of Management has moved into its new home, Edward P. Evans Hall. The huge glass palace on Whitney Avenue is an architectural landmark for New Haven, but it's also attracted some controversy.

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Architecture
5:25 am
Sat January 11, 2014

Historic House Is Yours Free, But There's A Catch

Architects at Paolasquare International are giving away this historic house in Arlington, Va. for free.
Sarah L. Voisin The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 11, 2014 12:53 pm

This little house is looking for a home.

In the past five years, 600 single-family homes have been demolished in Arlington, Va., many to make way for larger houses, according to a preservation group. One architectural firm is so determined to save one 1920s Sears kit house from demolition, it's giving the house away for free. But there's a catch: the buyer would need to pay to move it to a new location.

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These Old Houses
3:29 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Trying to Tackle Blight in Hartford

Mayor Pedro Segarra stands with city staff in front of a recently revamped home.
Credit Jeff Cohen / WNPR

In old cities with old housing, blight is a constant concern. Now, Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is boosting a program to give residents money to fix up their homes. 

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Host's Diary
12:16 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

"Holy [Bleep]!" Memories of the Hartford Civic Center Roof Collapse

Credit CPTV

The first time you laid eyes on it, the sheer size tended to rip your vocabulary away from you. It was so damn big -- 2.4 acres! -- and the bulk of it just sagged into the middle, right on top of the space that you knew was designed for thousands of people to sit in. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:29 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Remembering the Collapse of the Hartford Civic Center Roof

The collapse of the Hartford Civic Center roof in January 1978.
Credit CPTV

For many years, Ralph Nader has pushed the idea of an American Museum of Tort History which would be located somewhere in Connecticut, probably Winsted. The exhibits would concern tort cases from all over the U.S. but you have to think the Hartford Civic Center roof collapse would merit a special diorama.

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New York over Chicago
11:46 am
Tue November 12, 2013

New York's One World Trade Center Declared Tallest Building In U.S.

The world's tallest buildings by architectural top.
CTBUH

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:02 pm

One World Trade Center — the skyscraper that now rises from the site of the Twin Towers, destroyed during the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11 — has been declared the tallest building in the U.S. by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Coming in at 1,776 feet tall, the World Trade Center beat out the Willis Tower in Chicago. At issue was whether a 408-foot needle that sits atop the New York building was an architectural top or a removable radio antenna. If it had been deemed an antenna, the honor would have gone to Chicago.

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Architecture
3:03 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Size Does Matter, At Least In The Tallest Building Debate

The view from the Willis Tower, formerly known as Sears Tower, in Chicago.
FleishmanHillard

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:20 pm

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

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Where We Live
12:00 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Solving Social Problems Using Public-Interest Design

Butaro Hospital in Rwanda was designed by Michael Murphy, former Harvard architecture student, and now CEO of MASS Design Group
Credit massdesigngroup.org

“Social” or “public-interest” design is working in high-risk neighborhoods all over the country, proving that thoughtful, community-involved design ideas really can address a community’s critical issues and needs. Architect Bryan Bell says, “Never before have so many of the world’s problems been as accessible to design solutions.” He founded Design Corps, where he trains architects to use their skills to address social problems. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
4:10 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Is Work the Best Place to Work?

David Arai is the president of Maier Design Group
Chion Wolf

I've been writing a newspaper column for The Hartford Courant since 1982. For my first 15 years or so, I tended to write the column at The Hartford Courant. In the last ten years, I have written columns in the following places: a sports bar in San Francisco; a boat moving along the Rhine; the famous Brasserie Balzar in Paris; an outdoor clearing in the Yucatan jungle where, bizarrely, there was WiFi; and a living room in Kobe, Japan.

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Host's Diary
5:24 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

What's the Physical Space Like Where You Work?

Depressing Cambridge University cubicles.
Credit cmglee / Creative Commons

We're working on a show about whether work is the best place to do work. So we're nosy interested in how you feel about the physical spaces at your job. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:57 am
Mon June 17, 2013

A. M. Homes, Jeanne Marie Laskas, and a Look at Long Island Modernism

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:57 am
Mon June 17, 2013

A.M. Homes, Jeanne Marie Laskas, and a Look at Long Island Modernism

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in 2oth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

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News
9:21 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Inside A Green Building

Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

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Connecticut
9:21 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Inside A Green Building

Yale University

In the middle of Yale's gothic campus is a discreet arched building, shaped like a barn. Kroon Hall is one of the world's greenest office buildings. On this Earth week, WNPR's Samaia Hernandez takes us on a tour: 

The 50 environmentally-conscious workers at Kroon Hall love this place.  How much?

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Less Is More
3:06 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

Discussing "Pocket Neighborhoods" in New Haven

The economy and environmental concerns are slowly reversing the trend of suburban sprawl and embracing concepts such as pocket neighborhoods – or groups of smaller houses clustered around a shared space, like a park or community garden. An architect who has revived the concept in the past 20 years shared his views in New Haven last night.

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Where We Live
10:47 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Scraping the Sky

Jay Zhang (Flickr Creative Commons)

A hundred years ago, the tallest building in the world was 700 feet. Today, the record is 2,000 feet taller than that...and this trend isn’t slowing down. Skyscrapers have gone from being merely “tall” to “supertall.” Seven of the world’s ten tallest skyscrapers were built since the turn of the millennium.

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Where We Live
10:45 am
Tue January 31, 2012

The Urban Metabolism

compujeramey

Having a “high metabolism” is seen as a positive for humans...what about cities?

The idea of “urban metabolism” comes from a new book by Austin Troy, associate professor at the University of Vermont’s Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources.  He’s the author of The Very Hungry City: Urban Energy Efficiency and the Economic Fate of Cities

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Where We Live
9:41 am
Fri July 8, 2011

Olmsted's Legacy

The Faith Middleton Show
7:32 am
Fri July 8, 2011

Architecture; Green Cleaning Products; And Bloodsuckers

Garrett Wade

One of America's most talented modernist architects, Deborah Berke, who teaches at Yale, and does homes and commercial buildings across the world. She walks us through the process of designing a home that is also a work of art. Plus, green cleaning products, and the Yale Peabody Museum's latest exhibit: Invasion of the Bloodsuckers.

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The Faith Middleton Show
9:24 am
Sat April 2, 2011

Connecticut Cottages and Gardens

Keith Scott Morton

The publications inform and inspire readers with original place-based features, architecture and art, including insider views of local real estate transactions, original articles featuring photos of local homes and gardens, entertaining and the good life. The award-winning magazines are oversized and designed to emphasize superior journalism and photography, all written to the highest national standards and inspired by a local sense of place.

 

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Hartford Development
3:37 pm
Tue February 8, 2011

Front Street in Court

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

The retail development known as Front Street in Hartford is finally built and looking for tenants.  But the project took years to materialize, and now it's in court.

Front Street is a publicly-subsidized development that was geared to attract area people to downtown Hartford and the adjacent Connecticut Convention Center.  Here’s how George Royster puts it. He's an attorney for the state:

“Because people coming to Hartford with no place to go would not be likely to return to the convention center or the hotel if they had no entertainment or retail or places to eat.”

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