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animals

Anthony Quintano / Creative Commons

When you think of evolution, you might picture the classic textbook illustration "March of Progress" by Rudolph Zallinger. It shows how, over 25 million years, our human ancestors slowly transform from hunched apes into modern homo sapiens. But now, thanks in part to roads and highways, lots of evolution happens much quicker than that.

Last summer Felicia Keesing returned from a long trip and found that her home in upstate New York had been subjected to an invasion.

"There was evidence of mice everywhere. They had completely taken over," says Keesing, an ecologist at Bard College.

It was a plague of mice. And it had landed right in Keesing's kitchen.

Wikimedia Commons

A Yale anthropologist and dozens of other researchers from around the world warn that about 60 percent of earth's primates are at risk of extinction. It's dire news for our closest biological relatives.

DAVID SCHEEL / Flickr Creative Commons

The octopus has always been the stuff of spine-tingling legend, like that of the Kraken, the many-armed sea monster believed to drag ships to the bottom of the sea after dining on the crew. Or  Gertie the Pus, the giant Pacific octopus that lives under the Narrows Bridge connecting Tacoma, Washington to Gig Harbor.

Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

Are you a cat owner -- a self-described “cat mom” or “cat dad”? If you answered “yes” to that question, then here’s another one for you: Do you let your feline slink around outdoors? 

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