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agriculture

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New England Brewing Company’s Robert Leonard has been brewing local favorites Sea Hag and Gandhi Bot, now called G-Bot, for decades. 

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As the federal government renews tests to determine how much glyphosate is in America’s foods, Connecticut environmental groups, organic farmers and a U.S. senator say it’s time to limit the use of, or ban, the popular herbicide.

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Some plant common names can steer you in the wrong direction. Take Rose of Sharon for example. 

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With the zucchinis coming on hot and heavy and winter squash not far behind, you might welcome some insects that prey on these cucurbits. But while squash can be overly abundant, I'd never wish squash bugs or squash vine borers on any gardener.

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Many of us take it for granted that much of our food comes from seeds. But did you know 94% of our seed varieties have disappeared in the last century?

This hour, we talk with the co-director of the documentary SEED: The Untold Story. We find out how we lost a wealth of seed diversity and we learn about seed savers who are working to bring that diversity back.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60 acres of property near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks a question: What’s farmland?

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This pest is native to the Southwest United States but has spread and become a worldwide problem for anyone growing potatoes. It's the Colorado potato beetle. 

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We think of peaches as a special summer treat from Georgia or New Jersey, but they were originally grown in China and can be grown in Connecticut. 

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Deepwater Wind, the group behind the nation's first offshore wind farm, is now proposing a massive clean energy project in Connecticut. The company wants to build what could be one of region's largest solar farms in Simsbury.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Thousands of fragrant and colorful roses will be in full bloom for Hartford's Elizabeth Park Rose Weekend this Saturday and Sunday. A new addition this year is the newly-dedicated Heritage Rose Garden, where rare and historic species thrive. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Although I grew up in Waterbury with a big veggie garden in the backyard, my first foray into gardening as an adult was in a community garden. 

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It's June, and that means it's time for fresh strawberries in Connecticut. Strawberries are ripe for the picking, and there are strawberry festivals around the state. 

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After a hesitant start to summer, I think it's finally here. That's good news for watermelon lovers. Watermelons, like all melons, love the heat. So far it's been a slow start to summer, but luckily these cucurbits grow fast under the right conditions.

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What do you do with a vegetable that looks like a spaceship? Kohlrabi isn't the prettiest veggie on the block, but it sure is easy to grow and surprisingly tasty and versatile in the kitchen.

Jon Kalish / New England News Collaborative

There's a thriving scene on YouTube where woodworkers, metalworkers and other "makers" provide a step-by-step guide to their process.

In Waterford, Maine a maker named Gardner Waldeier -- who calls himself “Bus Huxley” -- has been entertaining viewers with equal portions of Yankee ingenuity and video wizardry.

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