WNPR

agriculture

While Vermont dairy farmers are experiencing some of the hardest times in recent memory, their counterparts in Quebec are thriving. The reason is a complex system that regulates the supply of milk  and sets the price farmers receive.

While Vermont is by far the highest producing maple syrup state in the United States, 70 percent of the world's maple syrup is made in Québec.

And that's where the benchmark global price for bulk maple syrup — the price paid by processors to Vermont's maple syrup producers — is set each year by a powerful, but legal, cartel.

As the nation's dairy farmers struggle through their fourth year of depressed milk prices, concerns are rising that many are becoming depressed themselves. The outlook for the next year is so bleak, it's heightening worries — especially in the Northeast — about farmer suicides.

Agri-Mark Inc., a dairy cooperative with about 1,000 members, saw three farmers take their own lives in the past three years. The most recent was last month. It's a very small sample, but very sharp and disturbing increase.

Organic dairy farmers are getting paid less because of an oversupply of their milk, a market glut that’s led one major organic buyer to delay signing on new farmers.

For dairy farms in New England, the outlook for milk prices is not good this year. The stress has been tied to suicides among dairy farmers.

United States Department of Agriculture / Creative Commons

A massive solar project in Simsbury is now one step closer to becoming one of New England’s largest clean-energy projects.

jetsandzeppelins / Creative Commons

The latest report from the Council on Environmental Quality says the state isn't equipped to monitor thousands of pesticide products and companies in Connecticut.

Where's The Beef!??

Nov 8, 2017
Chris Prosperi / Chef, Metro Bis

The veggie burger is  enjoying a renaissance! They've been in America since the Kellogg Brothers first fed their soy-based burger to guests at their Battle Creek Sanitarium in the 19th century, but they've never been as popular as with the newest iteration: a genetically engineered plant-based burger that tastes, smells, and looks just like - meat. It even drips blood.   

Thames Society of Paranormal Investigations

Footsteps in the attic? Shadows in the basement? Who you gonna call?

Shamus Denniston.

This hour, we sit down with the founder and director of the Thames Society of Paranormal Investigations. We hear spine-tingling stories of local hauntings and take your ghostly comments. 

Plant Chicago / Creative Commons

I'm always looking for unusual ways to grow gardens. One technique I stumbled upon has been used in Germany and Eastern Europe for hundreds of years. It's called hugelkultur.

Just in time for fall, a new heavyweight champ of the botanical variety — tipping the scales at more than one ton — has squashed the competition.

A giant green squash broke the world record Saturday at the Southern New England Giant Pumpkin Growers Pumpkin Weigh-off at Frerichs Farm in Warren, R.I.

Joe Jutras of Scituate, R.I., grew the 2,118 pound fruit. After the number appeared on the scale, the other growers lifted Jutras onto their shoulders.

Seacoast Eat Local / Creative Commons

With the cool weather and short days of October, thoughts often go towards pumpkins and winter squash.

Natalia Wilson / Creative Commons

With all the hot weather this week, it's hard to think about planting for spring. Heck, I'm still swimming! But October is bulb planting time and one of the beauties is the crocus.

Angela George / Creative Commons

Sam Waterston says he's been been lucky to have good fortune in his career and personal life. He's been nominated multiple times for Emmy, Academy, and Tony Awards and he won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards for performances playing men whose moral compass points north.  

Tom Gill / Creative Commons

Most of the vegetables I grow are primarily for eating. Some may be beautiful too, but if you can't eat it, I'm not interested. The exception is gourds. 

Pages