WNPR

agriculture

Where's The Beef!??

Nov 8, 2017
Chris Prosperi / Chef, Metro Bis

The veggie burger is  enjoying a renaissance! They've been in America since the Kellogg Brothers first fed their soy-based burger to guests at their Battle Creek Sanitarium in the 19th century, but they've never been as popular as with the newest iteration: a genetically engineered plant-based burger that tastes, smells, and looks just like - meat. It even drips blood.   

Thames Society of Paranormal Investigations

Footsteps in the attic? Shadows in the basement? Who you gonna call?

Shamus Denniston.

This hour, we sit down with the founder and director of the Thames Society of Paranormal Investigations. We hear spine-tingling stories of local hauntings and take your ghostly comments. 

Plant Chicago / Creative Commons

I'm always looking for unusual ways to grow gardens. One technique I stumbled upon has been used in Germany and Eastern Europe for hundreds of years. It's called hugelkultur.

Just in time for fall, a new heavyweight champ of the botanical variety — tipping the scales at more than one ton — has squashed the competition.

A giant green squash broke the world record Saturday at the Southern New England Giant Pumpkin Growers Pumpkin Weigh-off at Frerichs Farm in Warren, R.I.

Joe Jutras of Scituate, R.I., grew the 2,118 pound fruit. After the number appeared on the scale, the other growers lifted Jutras onto their shoulders.

Seacoast Eat Local / Creative Commons

With the cool weather and short days of October, thoughts often go towards pumpkins and winter squash.

Natalia Wilson / Creative Commons

With all the hot weather this week, it's hard to think about planting for spring. Heck, I'm still swimming! But October is bulb planting time and one of the beauties is the crocus.

Angela George / Creative Commons

Sam Waterston says he's been been lucky to have good fortune in his career and personal life. He's been nominated multiple times for Emmy, Academy, and Tony Awards and he won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards for performances playing men whose moral compass points north.  

Tom Gill / Creative Commons

Most of the vegetables I grow are primarily for eating. Some may be beautiful too, but if you can't eat it, I'm not interested. The exception is gourds. 

Mark / Creative Commons

Growing up an Italian-American in Waterbury, I have fond memories of my mom canning tomatoes in late summer. It always seemed to be a hot day when she canned and her boiling water bath just added to the stickiness in the air. But those tasty canned tomatoes made for great sauce all winter.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Herbert Hoover realized early in the 20th century that food was as important as bullets to win a war. After witnessing Belgians starve under the harsh treatment of Germany before World War I, he determined to never let that happen in America. So, when the men marched off to war in both World War I and again in World War II, the women marched out to the fields. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture said Thursday he hopes progress towards immigration reforms around farm labor could lead to a more comprehensive immigration policy fix. Sonny Perdue was speaking during a forum with Connecticut farmers. 

Men In Black / Creative Commons

I call this the golden time of year in the garden. Goldenrods and sunflowers are peaking. But the plant that really shines in late-summer is rudbeckia or black-eyed Susan. 

Ryan Wightman / Creative Commons

This native wildflower is often overlooked as a garden plant. 

In New England, 22 percent of the region's native plants are considered rare. Some of them are on the federal list of endangered species. Biologists worldwide and locally have been saving crop seeds, and seeds from other plants important to the ecosystem. 

Rachel Paxton / Creative Commons

It was a slow start to the melon and watermelon season. Cool, rainy spring weather delayed planting and early growth, but now they're coming on strong.

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