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Several studies reveal that millennials are not attending live arts performances at the same rate as other age groups. This does not bode well for the future of arts organizations, which have to rely more and more on the patronage of an increasingly aging audience to make ends meet.

The Blue Diamond Gallery / Creative Commons

Sure, you’ve heard the words “midlife crisis.” It’s possible you’ve even used them... you know, to justify that flashy new car you purchased at age 50?

But what exactly is a midlife crisis? Is it truly a crisis? Or something else? This hour, take a closer look with Jonathan Rauch, author of the new book The Happiness Curve

Plus: too old to work? We wade through some of the challenges preventing older career-seekers from landing new employment.

And finally: harassment in the workplace. What can a small-business employee do when a situation with a boss or colleague gets out of hand? We find out. 

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Joe Biden is seriously thinking about running for president in 2020. He's got a wealth of political experience and institutional knowledge. He's vibrant and in good health.  He's also seventy-five-years-old. Many of us are quietly wondering if he's too old for the job.

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It's expensive to die in America. We spend upwards of $3 trillion on medical care, a large percentage of those dollars concentrated in the last year of a person's life.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Alejandro La Luz Rivera pulled the keys from his pocket, unlocked the heavy gate, and walked slowly up the outdoor stairs leading to what used to be a rooftop patio. Before Maria, this was the 90-year-old's favorite place to be. Now, without electricity, it's not as quiet up here — he doesn't have a generator, but his neighbors do. And the patio is gone, destroyed by the hurricane and its winds.

you me / Creative Commons

This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

National Hurricane Center

Millions sought refuge as Irma charged its way through Florida over the weekend. This hour, we get an update on the storm’s impact.

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A growing number of women are getting hurt by falling, and they are much more likely to suffer fall-related injuries than men, data show.

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour: breakthroughs in brain science.

Coming up, we take a look inside the minds of so-called "superagers" -- older adults whose brains are not only challenging the hands of time, but also raising some big questions within the scientific community. What are some of the best tips and tricks to keep your brain young and healthy? We take a closer look. 

Alan Levine / flickr creative commons

"Accessibility" is a word that we maybe too quickly file away as having something to do with the disabled or something like that. But it's really about "designing all products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible by everyone, regardless of their age, ability, or status in life."

It's about seeing the world around us as for everyone, all at once.

McBeth / Creative Commons

Many of America's young adults appear to be in no hurry to move out of their old bedrooms. For the first time on record, living with parents is now the most common arrangement for people ages 18 to 34. 

"The way kids speak today, I'm here to tell you." Over the course of history, every aging generation has made that complaint, and it has always turned out to be overblown. That's just as well. If the language really had been deteriorating all this time, we'd all be grunting like bears by now.

Millennials are now as large of a political force as Baby Boomers according to an analysis of U.S. census data from the Pew Research Center, which defines millennials as people between the ages of 18-35. Both generations are roughly 31 percent of the overall electorate.

Patrick Doheny / Creative Commons

The world is getting older. According to the National Institutes of Health, the number of people aged 65 and up will grow to 1.6 billion by mid-century. 

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