WNPR

2016 Election

Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

WNPR will feature news updates on the air and on WNPR.org throughout the day on November 8.

Keep up with the latest news throughout the evening on air and online with live updates from NPR and WNPR reporters.

WNPR is also taking a road trip on Election Day and invites you along on Facebook Live. Throughout the day, WNPR reporter Jeff Cohen will visit a polling place or two, a college campus, Hartford City Hall, and our own newsroom, checking in on WNPR’s talk shows Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. Find it all on WNPR’s Facebook page, bringing you news on Election Day as Connecticut goes to the polls.

Below is our roundup of reports from NPR and WNPR on the 2016 race for President of the United States and U.S. Congress.

Ways to Connect

Who's Messing With Our Elections?

Oct 5, 2017
WNPR

Russian hacking, fake news--if the last election  taught us anything, it’s that your vote is a valuable commodity.

Hillary Clinton's final campaign for office ended in a shocking defeat. But she isn't going quietly into the night.

"I think the country's at risk, and I'm trying to sound the alarm so more people will at least pay attention," Clinton told NPR.

That said, her career as a candidate is over.

"I'm done. I'm not running for office," Clinton said. But for those, including Democrats, who would like her to just go away? "Well, they're going to be disappointed," she said.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

Cultural leaders are beating a hasty retreat from President Trump. 

Bernard Goldbach / Creative Commons

The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

DACA / Creative Commons

Hundreds of followers of the white nationalist movement came to Charlottesville over the weekend to protest the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee. The City Council voted to remove it from a park whose name they changed from Lee Park to Emancipation Park.

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

Almost nine months after the 2016 election, there still isn’t one generally agreed-upon theory of what happened.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Donald Trump Jr. thinks it's no big deal that he met with an emissary of the Russian government because the meeting didn't provide him with useful material.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty won re-election to the 5th District last November.

This hour, the Connecticut Democrat stops by our studios. We wade through national politics and find out what issues top her agenda on Capitol Hill. 

Kremlin / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump left a trail of confusion when he left the G-20 Summit this weekend. While the president thinks he gained concessions favorable to the United States, many feel he isolated America from longstanding consensus on issues that define liberal democracy. Instead, he sought consensus with Vladimir Putin, despite the certainty by U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. election. 

Beverly and Pack / Creative Commons

In 2075, Florida and New Orleans are under water, South Carolina is under quarantine, and America is fighting a bloody and brutal Second American Civil War over the continued use of fossil fuels. This is where American War, ​a new novel by Omar El Akkad begins.

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institution

Colin, along with WNPR's John Dankosky and former FBI special agent Michael Clark, will react to the testimony of former FBI Director James Comey, at Thursday morning's hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. 

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

A Senate hearing Monday on Russian meddling in the 2016 election is expected to feature two powerful Washington women, one of whom will be in the room — and one of whom will not.

Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET

In her most frank remarks to date after her loss to President Trump, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton said that if not for a controversial letter from FBI Director James Comey and Russian meddling in the election, she would be sitting in the Oval Office right now.

Gadjo_Niglo / Creative Commons

The world is riveted by the presidential election in France, which seems to be at the epicenter of clashing ideological forces vying to shape the future of Western democracy. All we know for sure after Sunday's first round of voting is that the May 7 winner will not be a Socialist. For the first time in 59 years, France chose two candidates outside the mainstream parties to advance to the final run-off in May. 

Bernard Goldbach / Creative Commons

The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

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