WNPR

2016 Election

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WNPR will feature news updates on the air and on WNPR.org throughout the day on November 8.

Keep up with the latest news throughout the evening on air and online with live updates from NPR and WNPR reporters.

WNPR is also taking a road trip on Election Day and invites you along on Facebook Live. Throughout the day, WNPR reporter Jeff Cohen will visit a polling place or two, a college campus, Hartford City Hall, and our own newsroom, checking in on WNPR’s talk shows Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. Find it all on WNPR’s Facebook page, bringing you news on Election Day as Connecticut goes to the polls.

Below is our roundup of reports from NPR and WNPR on the 2016 race for President of the United States and U.S. Congress.

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Inauguration Day is here. In a few short days, President Obama will transfer what remains of his power to Donald Trump. Some are elated, others afraid.

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

The inauguration is days away. Whether you're excited or not, the transfer of power from Barack Obama to Donald Trump is an historic event.  And an expensive event, at a price tag of more than $200 million. The Department of Homeland Security says they expect 900,000, including many protestors. While past Presidents like Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, and George W. Bush will be in attendance, more than fifty House Democrats say they will not attend

Travis Wise / Creative Commons

The plane that crashed in a Pennsylvania field on 9/11 was likely headed for the U.S. Capitol. Had it hit its intended target and disabled - not killed -  multiple members of Congress, we wouldn't be able to look to the Constitution for answers on how to prevent the resulting chaos. It simply doesn't address it.

President-elect Donald Trump took to Twitter again Thursday morning, this time to urge his followers to "Buy L.L.Bean," and support one of his campaign backers.

"Thank you to Linda Bean of L.L.Bean for your great support and courage," he tweeted Thursday. "People will support you even more now. Buy L.L.Bean."

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It's been over 160 days since Donald Trump last gave a press conference. On Wednesday, as he holds his first as President-elect, questions abound regarding the type of president he'll be.

Certainly Trump's cabinet picks, promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and remarks on nuclear weapons will be among the many items asked about. But whether he gives clear, informed answers rather than the off-script, stream of consciousness he's become known for remains to be seen.

Pete Souza / White House

Last night night, President Obama delivered his farewell address to the nation. The speech was - let’s say, juxtaposed - with news that intelligence officials have briefed both Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump about reports that Russia had gathered “salacious” and compromising material about Trump. Although, it’s unclear what exactly counts as salacious anymore. 

U.K. Department for International Development / Creative Commons


  His followers were “impressionable voters” duped by “radical doctrines and quack remedies,” claimed The Washington Post. Now that Hitler actually had to operate within a government the “sober” politicians would “submerge” this movement, according to The New York Times and Christian Science Monitor. A “keen sense of dramatic instinct” was not enough. When it came to time to govern, his lack of “gravity” and “profundity of thought” would be exposed.

President-elect Donald Trump is rounding out his White House team — installing several trusted campaign advisers to senior West Wing positions.

Kellyanne Conway will serve as counselor to the president, the transition team announced on Thursday. Sean Spicer will be press secretary, and Jason Miller has been named director of communications.

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

The electoral college voted, and Donald Trump is still President-elect. But that big news paled in comparison to two terror attacks that posed direct threats to relations between European countries, Russia, Turkey and the conflict in Syria. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty said she's been contacted by many people who are concerned about the future of public education under a Donald Trump administration. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

As expected, all seven of Connecticut's presidential electors cast their ballots for Hillary Clinton for president and Tim Kaine for vice president in a ceremony at the state Capitol on Monday.

Wikipedia

The Voice of ​America is a U.S.- funded and independent source of news that airs in societies that don't have a free press. Last week, Congress decided to shift oversight from an independent board to one person chosen by the president. President Obama embraced the shift from an unwieldy part-time advisory board to a professional CEO. Do we trust Donald Trump, a man who has threatened to change libel laws to better control the U.S. press, with this responsibility?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Five hundred thirty-eight members of the Electoral College meet Monday in state capitols across the U.S. to cast their votes for the next president -- and Connecticut U.S. Congressman Jim Himes is calling on them to reject President-elect Donald Trump.

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Electoral College.

There's a pair of words you've maybe heard once or twice recently.

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The CIA released a report that Russia intervened in the election, findings that President-elect Donald Trump says are "ridiculous." It has many Americans wondering about the role of the electoral college. Could these electors actually vote to keep Trump out of the White House? The New York Times called that chance a “moonshot.” 

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

Ben Carson has a new role as head of Housing and Urban Development. Trump took a controversial call with Taiwan. On Twitter, the President-elect threatened companies who plan to move jobs overseas, and criticized the cost of the new Air Force One: "Cancel order!"

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.

Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.

I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.

Mark / Creative Commons

Hate crimes and incidents of intimidation and harassment have increased across our nation, including here in Connecticut.

This hour, we speak with Connecticut's U.S. Attorney Deirdre Daly about a letter she wrote to the community urging residents to speak up and report these incidents.

In the past week President-elect Donald Trump has tweeted about Cuba, and the recount funded by the Green Party. He tweeted eleven times about Hillary Clinton and voter fraud, including a controversial tweet in which he claimed that "millions of people voted illegally." Trump re-tweeted a 16-year-old who criticized coverage of CNN, and said people who burn the American flag should face consequences - "perhaps loss of citizenship or a year in jail!" 

Stephen Moore, a senior economic adviser to Donald Trump, was once a doctrinaire libertarian and free-trader. Now, Moore says: "Donald Trump's victory has changed the [Republican] Party into a more populist working-class party in some ways that conservatives like myself will like and some that we'll be uncomfortable with."

Maureen McMurray / Creative Commons

The charged language used by President-elect Donald Trump this election season may have emboldened people with open hostility toward blacks, gay people, Muslims, Mexicans, Jews, and women.

How do we respond to incidents of hate and people who feel emboldened to hate? How do we teach our children to respond? How do we begin to see bigotry through a wider lens?

President-elect Donald Trump won a convincing electoral vote victory on Nov. 8, but he is claiming falsely that widespread voter fraud cost him the popular vote.

The latest totals show Hillary Clinton leading Trump in the popular vote by more than 2 million. Trump tweeted on Sunday afternoon, "I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally." He did not provide evidence to back up that claim, and Trump's representatives did not immediately respond to a request for more information.

jennie-o, creative commons

In his recent New Yorker commentary, Jelani Cobb writes about the defiance some states are feeling towards President-elect Trump and his policies. Democratic leaders in California and New York have released statements saying they'll protect their most vulnerable communities. 

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley has been selected as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in President-elect Donald Trump's administration, according to Trump's transition team.

Haley has accepted the position, which requires Senate confirmation.

NPR State Department correspondent Michele Kelemen reports the position was elevated to Cabinet rank by President George W. Bush and that President Barack Obama kept the designation. But Kelemen says the job of U.N. ambassador was not traditionally Cabinet-rank and it's unclear whether Trump will maintain that status.

Meeting with The New York Times today, Donald Trump said the words many have been waiting for: "I disavow and condemn them."

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