WNPR

2016 Election

Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

WNPR will feature news updates on the air and on WNPR.org throughout the day on November 8.

Keep up with the latest news throughout the evening on air and online with live updates from NPR and WNPR reporters.

WNPR is also taking a road trip on Election Day and invites you along on Facebook Live. Throughout the day, WNPR reporter Jeff Cohen will visit a polling place or two, a college campus, Hartford City Hall, and our own newsroom, checking in on WNPR’s talk shows Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. Find it all on WNPR’s Facebook page, bringing you news on Election Day as Connecticut goes to the polls.

Below is our roundup of reports from NPR and WNPR on the 2016 race for President of the United States and U.S. Congress.

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Updated at 7:51 p.m. ET

A Justice Department watchdog on Thursday criticized former FBI Director James Comey for violating long-standing department guidelines and mishandling the Hillary Clinton email investigation in 2016.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

Prosecutors unsealed more charges on Friday against Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and also accused a new defendant of conspiring with Manafort to obstruct justice.

Prosecutors allege that a Russian partner of Manafort's, Konstantin Kilimnik, helped him try to persuade witnesses to lie to the jury when Manafort's case comes to trial in Washington, D.C., this autumn.

Sarah Kendzior

Sarah Kendzior predicted that the conditions she witnessed in 2013 from her home in America's overlooked heartland would lead to the rise of a candidate like Donald Trump. She was one of the few that saw it coming.

Tripp / Creative Commons

 

Comedy forces us to confront uncomfortable realities that we prefer to ignore. It also makes us laugh. Laughter is a powerful force. It can release chemicals in our body that make us feel good and help us better cope with the daily stress of living in a world that can lately seem to be spiraling out of control. 

Lonnie Tague / United States Department of Justice

The sudden resignation of New York’s attorney general could complicate lawsuits where Connecticut cooperates with the Empire State.

A polling place on Election Day 2017 in Waterbury.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state Senate passed a bill Saturday committing Connecticut to the effort supporting a national popular vote for the United States presidency.

Updated at 3:29 p.m. ET

President Trump admitted Thursday to reimbursing his lawyer for a $130,000 payment made on the eve of the 2016 election to porn actress Stormy Daniels as part of a settlement about her alleged 2006 sexual encounter with Trump.

Trump, however, denied any sexual encounter and claims the payment was in no way connected with the campaign — despite the timing.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

Matt Taibbi is an American journalist, author, and iconoclast. He is a contributor to Rolling Stone and the author of nine books, the most recent of which are Insane Clown President: Dispatches from the 2016 Circus and I Can't Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street.

SS&SS / Flickr

With controversies swirling around President Trump and the midterm elections approaching, many are asking, how will Evangelicals vote? Some believe values-voting Christians will stay home while others think issues like abortion, immigration, and religious liberty will be enough to drive them to the polls.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

We know now Russia has interfered with our 2016 presidential election, but did you know that the U.S. has meddled in over 80 elections since World War II according to one Carnegie Mellon study

This hour, we look at how our country has interfered with democratic processes around the world. How do we reconcile our country's actions with the threat facing us today?

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Conservative media giant Sinclair Broadcast Group will reach 72 percent of American homes with televisions if they're allowed to acquire Tribune Media. The president likes the idea - even as it breaks current FCC rules that no TV station owners should reach beyond 39 percent of homes. No wonder he likes it. A new analysis shows President Trump does better in areas lacking a trusted news outlet. 

Updated at 1:53 p.m. EDT

A federal judge has sentenced a Dutch lawyer to 30 days in prison and a $20,000 fine for lying to the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Alex van der Zwann, 33, is the first person to be sentenced in the ongoing probe by special counsel Robert Mueller. His lawyer argued van der Zwann deserved leniency for eventually coming clean about the wrongdoing — but U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson was unmoved.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

A lot has happened in the recent days. The news is fast, complicated, disturbing and in some cases, hopeful.

Film Sufi / filmsufi.com

Cambridge Analytica, a data company backed by Republican donor Robert Mercer and headed by Steve Bannon, harvested private information from almost 50 million Facebook users without their permission to develop and exploit psychological profiles in the 2016 U.S. election.

Is Democracy Dying?

Mar 7, 2018
Fort Meade Public Affairs Office / Creative Commons

Populism is on the rise from Europe to India to the United States.

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