WNPR

2016 Election

Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

WNPR will feature news updates on the air and on WNPR.org throughout the day on November 8.

Keep up with the latest news throughout the evening on air and online with live updates from NPR and WNPR reporters.

WNPR is also taking a road trip on Election Day and invites you along on Facebook Live. Throughout the day, WNPR reporter Jeff Cohen will visit a polling place or two, a college campus, Hartford City Hall, and our own newsroom, checking in on WNPR’s talk shows Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. Find it all on WNPR’s Facebook page, bringing you news on Election Day as Connecticut goes to the polls.

Below is our roundup of reports from NPR and WNPR on the 2016 race for President of the United States and U.S. Congress.

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With controversies swirling around President Trump and the midterm elections approaching, many are asking, how will Evangelicals vote? Some believe values-voting Christians will stay home while others think issues like abortion, immigration, and religious liberty will be enough to drive them to the polls.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

We know now Russia has interfered with our 2016 presidential election, but did you know that the U.S. has meddled in over 80 elections since World War II according to one Carnegie Mellon study

This hour, we look at how our country has interfered with democratic processes around the world. How do we reconcile our country's actions with the threat facing us today?

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Conservative media giant Sinclair Broadcast Group will reach 72 percent of American homes with televisions if they're allowed to acquire Tribune Media. The president likes the idea - even as it breaks current FCC rules that no TV station owners should reach beyond 39 percent of homes. No wonder he likes it. A new analysis shows President Trump does better in areas lacking a trusted news outlet. 

Updated at 1:53 p.m. EDT

A federal judge has sentenced a Dutch lawyer to 30 days in prison and a $20,000 fine for lying to the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Alex van der Zwann, 33, is the first person to be sentenced in the ongoing probe by special counsel Robert Mueller. His lawyer argued van der Zwann deserved leniency for eventually coming clean about the wrongdoing — but U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson was unmoved.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

A lot has happened in the recent days. The news is fast, complicated, disturbing and in some cases, hopeful.

Film Sufi / filmsufi.com

Cambridge Analytica, a data company backed by Republican donor Robert Mercer and headed by Steve Bannon, harvested private information from almost 50 million Facebook users without their permission to develop and exploit psychological profiles in the 2016 U.S. election.

Is Democracy Dying?

Mar 7, 2018
Fort Meade Public Affairs Office / Creative Commons

Populism is on the rise from Europe to India to the United States.

President Trump's proclivity for putting his name on buildings, steaks, ties and certificates is well-known. But former adult film actress Stormy Daniels says he failed to put his name on their contract.

Daniels, whose given name is Stephanie Clifford, filed a civil suit against President Trump on Tuesday alleging the nondisclosure agreement she signed just days before the 2016 election is invalid because it's missing Trump's signature.

Updated on March 6 at 11:45 a.m. ET

A former campaign aide to Donald Trump appears to have changed his mind and will not fight a subpoena he says he has received in the Russia investigation — after daring special counsel Robert Mueller to arrest him in multiple media appearances.

Sam Nunberg called reporters and TV news programs on Monday and said live that he'd gotten a grand jury subpoena as part of Mueller's investigation asking for communications with other people in the Trump orbit — but that he would not comply.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff / Creative Commons

Like the Alexander of children's literature, President Trump had a "terrible, horrible, no good, very bad" week.

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET

Rick Gates, the business partner of Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, pleaded guilty on Friday to two charges and will begin cooperating with federal prosecutors investigating the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Gates appeared in federal court on Friday afternoon. He told Judge Amy Berman Jackson he was making the plea of his own free will.

Updated at 8:32 p.m. ET

A federal grand jury unveiled new charges on Thursday against Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates, accusing them of a broader range of financial crimes.

Lenna Utro-Shterenberg / Creative Commons

Robert Mueller on Friday indicted 13 Russian nationals and three organizations on charges related to interference in the 2016 U.S. electoral process. 

White House / Wikimedia Commons

Special counsel Robert Mueller has already charged several people associated with the Trump campaign with crimes uncovered in his investigation into Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election. Yet, some some believe there's a good chance he won't indict President Trump - even if he finds wrongdoing. 

Latvian Foreign Ministry / Flickr

Both Connecticut senators slammed a controversial memo released to the public today from the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee.

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