WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Battling lawmakers, a multi-billion dollar deficit, and the end of a gubernatorial era. April was -- without doubt -- an eventful month for state politics. 

This hour, we hear from the man at the helm of it all: Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy. With less than two years left to go, how does he plan to round off his second -- and final -- term in office? We find out and also we also hear from you.

The Ethel Walker School

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

State lawmakers are up against deadlines this week to settle on a budget plan — one that tackles a nearly two billion dollar deficit next year. But so far all we’ve seen is a logjam in Hartford.

This hour, we find out what gridlock at the capitol could mean for the state’s future.

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Zacchea, and co-author Ted Kemp about their book The Ragged Edge which details the challenges Zacchea faced leading a diverse group of Iraqis. 

Susan Melkisethian / Creative Commons

It’s been three months since the historic Women's March on Washington, and now D.C. is gearing up for another rally. A “March for Science” will transpire in the nation's capital Saturday, coinciding with marches across Connecticut and the globe. 

Basheer Tome / Creative Commons

A plan to consolidate operations within Connecticut’s State Colleges and Universities system — to save millions — has roiled staff and raised questions about how well the schools can respond to the needs of students in their communities.

This hour, we talk about the Board of Regents decision and we want to hear from you.

NIAID / Creative Commons

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Nearly half of American adults have it according to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

Leo Leung / Creative Commons

Ever since the Presidential election we’ve heard the buzzwords — “echo-chamber,” “facts,” “alternative facts.” More than ever our country is divided by how we get our information and what we see as the “truth.” Even reality itself has become debatable.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The mayor who wanted it is gone. The developer who built it is gone. And the plans to build around it are on hold. But finally, after a year of delay, Hartford’s new minor league baseball stadium is about to have its first minor league game. 

Eastern Connecticut Ballet

Five-foot, ten-inch dancer Gloria Govrin reached unprecedented heights when she joined the New York City Ballet nearly six decades ago. This hour, we take an in-depth look at her groundbreaking career -- including her work under choreographer George Balanchine ("Mr. B") -- and learn about the unique opportunity that brought her to Connecticut. 

Wikimedia

When we think of feminism, most people think of liberals and the Democratic party. But the Republicans were actually the first party to endorse the Equal Rights Amendment. And at that time, the GOP was more supportive of women’s right to vote than the Democratic party. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

This hour, we listen back to our recent panel discussion at B:Hive Bridgeport, a coworking space in the Park City's downtown. There, we met up with Bridgeport residents and lawmakers for a taste of the city's history, politics, culture… and even some locally-made gin! 

Connecticut State Library

April 6, 2017 marks 100 years since the United States officially entered the First World War — igniting the journey for thousands of young men to the deadly trenches of Europe.

This hour, we learn about the soldiers and hear how Connecticut was one of just a few states with records that explained how some of these men viewed their service. 

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