WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the senior producer:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Maisa Tisdale

Within the shadow of P.T. Barnum lies a much quieter tale of Bridgeport prosperity -- a tale involving two nineteenth-century sisters, Mary and Eliza Freeman.

While neither achieved the same level of recognition as Barnum, both established a significant place within the history of Connecticut’s Park City. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hate drives people to do unspeakable things but how often do these stories end in forgiveness and friendship?

This hour, Ted Hakey Jr. and Zahir Mannan join us. The two men met after Hakey shot his rifle into Mannan’s place of worship — the Ahmaddiya Baitul Amman Mosque in Meriden in 2015.

Tikeyah Whittle

If you’re a tea drinker, then you probably know the name Cindi Bigelow. She’s the third generation president and CEO of Fairfield-based Bigelow Tea.

Frédérique Voisin-Demery / Creative Commons

Many of us take it for granted that much of our food comes from seeds. But did you know 94% of our seed varieties have disappeared in the last century?

This hour, we talk with the co-director of the documentary SEED: The Untold Story. We find out how we lost a wealth of seed diversity and we learn about seed savers who are working to bring that diversity back.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

NIAID / Creative Commons

It’s mosquito season and the Zika virus still remains a threat in many parts of the world — including here in the U.S.

This hour, we hear the latest on efforts to develop a Zika vaccine and we find out what researchers have learned since last summer about how the virus causes microcephaly in newborns. 

SBSTNC / Creative Commons

Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. He's also an author, an editor, and a child of the so-called “one percent."

This hour, we sit down with Collins. We talk about his latest book and preview his upcoming appearance in Winsted, Connecticut. 

Sweet Chili Arts / Creative Commons

Environmental groups have drawn attention to sustainability and conservation, but insiders say movement leadership is overwhelmingly white.

This hour, we examine a lack of diversity in environmental activism and find out who’s working to change this.

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we learn about the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty won re-election to the 5th District last November.

This hour, the Connecticut Democrat stops by our studios. We wade through national politics and find out what issues top her agenda on Capitol Hill. 

Yale University

Here's something that might make you might think twice before ordering a bucket of drumsticks: tasty as they may be, those cooked morsels of meat actually come from... dinosaurs.

This hour, we take a closer look at what paleontologists have learned about the prehistoric ancestors of modern-day birds

Muzeum Lubelskie w Lublinie / Courtesty of Stacey Fitzgerald

During World War II the Nazis experimented on Polish women among others at Ravensbrück concentration camp outside of Berlin. After the war, socialite and Connecticut resident Caroline Ferriday helped bring dozens of these women to the U.S. for medical treatment. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Summer is officially here! And it looks like it's going to be a hot one.

This hour, we find out what opportunities -- and challenges -- lie ahead for Connecticut’s garden lovers. We check in with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi, and we want to hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Oz Griebel has been at the helm of the MetroHartford Alliance — since 2001 — promoting economic development in the Greater Hartford region.

This hour, we sit down with Griebel — after his announcement he’ll step down from his role as President and CEO at the end of this year. We talk about the region, the state, and his hopes for the future.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

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