WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

State lawmakers are up against deadlines this week to settle on a budget plan — one that tackles a nearly two billion dollar deficit next year. But so far all we’ve seen is a logjam in Hartford.

This hour, we find out what gridlock at the capitol could mean for the state’s future.

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Zacchea, and co-author Ted Kemp about their book The Ragged Edge which details the challenges Zacchea faced leading a diverse group of Iraqis. 

Susan Melkisethian / Creative Commons

It’s been three months since the historic Women's March on Washington, and now D.C. is gearing up for another rally. A “March for Science” will transpire in the nation's capital Saturday, coinciding with marches across Connecticut and the globe. 

Basheer Tome / Creative Commons

A plan to consolidate operations within Connecticut’s State Colleges and Universities system — to save millions — has roiled staff and raised questions about how well the schools can respond to the needs of students in their communities.

This hour, we talk about the Board of Regents decision and we want to hear from you.

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