Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a talk show about where we live in Connecticut, in New England, in the United States, and on the planet. It's also a show about who we are, and our place in the world.

Where We Live is a call-in show, so on any given day, listeners can join the conversation with elected officials and policy experts on a wide array of topics: from immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We also explore the latest scientific research, changes in the health care system, and how the effects of worldwide events like climate change impact us locally.

We take time to highlight our diverse communities and their contributions, including the arts and music. We take your questions, and we want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Universities didn’t always have power-house fundraising foundations supporting them - they came into popularity in the Reagan-era economy when government drastically cut higher education funding, so more and more schools had to turn to private donors.

Jamelle Bouie / Creative Commons

During his speech in Cuba, President Barack Obama described just how different this year's presidential race is from those in previous generations. "You had two Cuban Americans in the Republican Party, running against the legacy of a black man who is President, while arguing that they’re the best person to beat the Democratic nominee who will either be a woman or a Democratic Socialist," said Obama.

Adavyd / Creative Commons

Time in the legislative session is starting to run down and the list of things to do remains long. This week on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we’re joined by Capitol reporters to catch us up on what is (and isn’t) getting done. Governor Dannel Malloy is going up against labor unions and asking for concessions to help with the budget but the rank and file union members haven't authorized a renegotiation of the current contract.

Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr Creative Commons

An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

Andrew Ciscel / Creative Commons

What if commuting between Connecticut and Long Island meant hopping into a car and driving through a tunnel deep below Long Island Sound? Sounds far-fetched, right?

Well, if you're New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, you might not think so. And if you're Amtrak, you might think it shouldn't be cars driving under the Sound, but trains connecting the Northeast Corridor

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined, a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

Chuck Kennedy / White House

It's that time of the political season when just about every Tuesday seems like a "Super Tuesday." More voters head to the polls, and on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the results, and take a look at what's ahead for both major political parties.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Creative Commons

New York's Indian Point nuclear facility has faced a number of recent incidents including fires, blown transformers, and most recently detection of radioactive water near the facility. This hour, an update on the situation there and in Florida where the Turkey Point nuclear facility is under scrutiny.

We also hear from WNPR’s David DesRoches, who has been following the story of PCBs in Connecticut schools and in Alabama.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Iason Athanasiadis is a writer, photojournalist, and documentary filmmaker who has spent years covering the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe. He was in Hartford recently to speak to the World Affairs Council of Connecticut, and stopped by our studios to talk about journalism in conflict regions and the Syrian migrant crisis. This hour, we listen back to that conversation.

Nick M / Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we feature stories and sounds from the West African country of Nigeria. 

First, WSHU reporter Ebong Udoma checks in from Abuja, Nigeria, where he's helped launch a brand new multimedia project called Gotel Africa. When completed, Gotel Africa will become the continent's first-ever pan-African news service. We learn more about it. 

In his new documentary, Connecticut journalism professor and newspaper columnist Frank Harris III spotlights what is unarguably one of the most controversial words in America: the n-word.

JasonParis. / Creative Commons

This hour, our news roundtable The Wheelhouse tackles some of the biggest political stories of the week. We discuss everything from state budget cuts, to automatic voter registration, to a "legislative mystery" that's got everyone asking: Who added language to the SEEC's bill? 

Charles Williams / Creative Commons

This hour -- from Maine to New Hampshire; Vermont to Massachusetts -- we learn how some of our New England neighbors are working to stem opioid addiction and overdose. 

NicoleMariePhotoworks/ Flickr Creative Commons

Spring is just around the corner, and with that comes gardening season! Are you thinking about how to get your garden ready? 

Sam Petherbridge / Creative Commons

Like most of the media landscape, public television is changing. The massive hit Downton Abbey wraps up this weekend, and Sesame Street is now premiering new episodes on HBO! But behind the scenes, broadcasters are taking part in an auction to sell of parts of their over-the-air signal. Most of the population has cable so they won’t be affected, but nearly 15 percent of people watch TV with an antennae.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

Few of us remember Hurricane Ike as vividly as we remember Katrina and Sandy. But for people down in Houston, Texas, the 2008 storm was a major wake-up call. 

WNPR

The future of some presidential campaigns may be decided on Super Tuesday, further slimming the field of candidates by the time Connecticut votes next month. If you can't wait to vote, maybe you can pass the time by playing an electoral board game created by a Connecticut resident. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses the results from the Democratic and Republican parties and previews what's to come. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When a woman addicted to opioids gives birth, she usually leaves her baby behind to be cared for by nurses. However, one Connecticut hospital is rethinking that approach. This hour, we find out why with WNPR reporter Jeff Cohen. 

Tom / Creative Commons

This hour -- from the outbreak of Zika virus to the spread of Lyme disease -- doctors and epidemiologists take our questions on some of the biggest public health stories to hit the news. We find out what we know, what we don’t know, and what the real risks are to Connecticut. 

Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr

An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

Mike Steele / Creative Commons

In The Slave's Cause, author and scholar Manisha Sinha writes a new history of abolition -- a history more complex than the one taught in most American classrooms. This hour, Sinha takes us inside her book for a look at abolition's lesser known past.  

Rik Stevens / New Hampshire Public Radio

In Nevada, Donald Trump cruised to an easy victory in the state’s caucuses. This hour, our weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse spends some time wondering whether the Trump juggernaut and the resurgent Hillary Clinton campaign might render our little state’s primary moot (again). 

Stephen Voss / NPR

In 2013, the unexpected departure of NPR CEO Gary Knell left the network, once again, in desperate need of a leader. So the board tapped Jarl Mohn -- a long-time philanthropist and media executive -- to step in and take the reins.

Paul Gionfriddo

Paul Gionfriddo leads Mental Health America but he has deep roots in Connecticut. He’s a former state representative and mayor of Middletown who now advocates for people with mental illness. During his time in the legislature, he worked on laws and policies that contributed to the nation's current mental health crisis. His book Losing Tim explores his own son’s struggle with schizophrenia and the mental health system that failed him.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, Kristina Newman-Scott sits down with us for the first time since becoming Connecticut's director of culture in 2015. We find out how things are going in her new position, and take your questions about local arts and culture. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Before delivering his "State of the State Address" two weeks ago, Gov. Dan Malloy said his budget proposal would be "austere" and that's what he delivered. His proposals include sweeping cuts across state government and he has heard from some critics of those cuts during town hall meetings. This hour, the governor stops by WNPR to discuss the state budget and other issues facing Connecticut.

Steve Petteway / Creative Commons

The political ramifications of Antonin Scalia's death became immediately apparent on Saturday. President Barack Obama said he will make his Supreme Court appointment and Senate Republicans said they will block confirmation. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse considers this political puzzle in Washington. Meanwhile, lawmakers in Hartford are working on what has become their annual puzzle: the state budget.

This hour -- from Holocaust survivor to iconic twentieth-century inventor -- we hear about the life and career of Hartford's own H. Joseph Gerber. His story is chronicled in the new biography, The Inventor's Dilemma.

Also, urbanist Richard Florida gives us his take on GE's move from Fairfield to Boston

Feryal Salem

The 2016 presidential race has been loaded with rhetoric about a so-called “ISIS caliphate." But what exactly is a caliphate? And what does it mean to say that ISIS has one? This hour, local Islamic scholar Dr. Feryal Salem fills us in. 

Museokeskus Vapriikki / Creative Commons

This hour, New Yorker editor David Remnick takes us for a behind-the-scenes look at his new radio show and podcast The New Yorker Radio Hour

We also chat with some of the creators of WNPR's new Radius Project. They're mapping Hartford in a new way -- we find out how. 

Pages