WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

"The Cat in the Hat comes back" to Springfield and he’s bringing a few of his friends. Yertle the Turtle, Horton, the Lorax -- all can be found at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss, a museum honoring the life and legacy of children’s author Theodor Geisel. 

Karendesuyo / Creative Commons

June is LGBT Pride Month — a time when marches, festivals and other events commemorate the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City.

This hour, we examine “gay pride” across the centuries — from ancient Greece to modern America.

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

Kamaljith K V / Creative Commons

This hour: family narratives -- how we share the stories of our lives and how those stories help shape who we are. 

Sam Greenhalgh / Creative Commons

Dyslexia is considered the most common learning disorder and yet it is often undiagnosed and rarely understood.

This hour, we look to better understand the dyslexic mind.

Jay Phagan / Creative Commons

This hour: privacy, policy, and the post-Snowden era.

Coming up, we hear how an exhibition at Hartford's Real Art Ways is challenging perceptions of corporate and government tracking. 

Photo courtesy of Dr. Loren Olson

Coming out as gay can be difficult — even traumatizing — for young people. But what is coming out like for older men and women, some who were once married to heterosexual spouses and who have children?

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Dr. Loren Olson, author of Finally Out: Letting Go of Living Straight

Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we revisit our show on the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we rebroadcast our audio tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

Francois Schnell / Creative Commons

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), roughly one in five adults in the U.S. experiences a mental illness each year -- that’s approximately 20 percent of all American adults. But even as awareness increases, the stigma associated with mental illness persists.

Tony Webster / Creative Commons

In the last 50 years, Sunday mass attendance in the Archdiocese of Hartford has declined 70 percent, and the number of active priests is down 65 percent. So it’s not a surprise that the Archdiocese is closing down and merging churches across the state -- from 212 to 127. This hour, we talk about the local mergers with priests and parishioners. 

Jean-Pierre Dalbéra / Creative Commons

Chartwell Dutiro is a Zimbabwe native and leading authority on the mbira tradition. He is also an experienced collaborator. This hour, we hear about his recent partnership with Timbila -- a band co-founded by Afropop Worldwide producer Banning Eyre. 

Photo courtesy Dr. Benjamin Kilham

With spring comes a rise in the number of black bear sightings in Connecticut.

This hour, we learn about a bear’s lifestyle and biology with author and scientist Dr. Benjamin Kilham.

www.audio-luci-store.it / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Sheff magnet system is back in the spotlight -- this time, for reports of questionable admissions practices.

This hour: hand-picked or luck of the draw? We find out how some Hartford-area schools have been skirting around the state’s lottery process

Jobs For Felons Hub / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s prison population is getting older, upping the demand for healthcare including hospice programs that serve inmates and ex-offenders.

This hour, we find out what it means to die with dignity behind bars. 

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