WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

When we're live in our New Haven studios call us at 203-776-9677.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the producers:

WNPR's executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

We know now Russia has interfered with our 2016 presidential election, but did you know that the U.S. has meddled in over 80 elections since World War II according to one Carnegie Mellon study

This hour, we look at how our country has interfered with democratic processes around the world. How do we reconcile our country's actions with the threat facing us today?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to the nation’s opioid crisis, substance abuse affects more than the addict. More and more children are entering the foster care system every year at an unprecedented rate.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Highly drug resistant gonorrhea has been reported in England. It’s the latest in a growing list of superbugs that are becoming resistant to last-resort antibiotics.

For much of the last century, doctors have been able to cure many once-fatal bacterial infections with a simple course of meds. But over the years, diseases have evolved and even the best drugs aren’t enough to combat the deadly bacteria.

This hour, we ask an infectious disease specialist--how worried should we be?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In light of mismanaged abuse allegations involving two former staffers, U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty announced Monday she will not seek re-election in November.

This hour, we discuss the significance of Esty's decision -- including what it means for Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District race this year.

Plus: With former VA Secretary David Shulkin out, what lies head for U.S. Veterans Affairs? Is the federal agency on track to become privatized? We find out.

And finally: We sit down with a local Army veteran who recently received a discharge upgrade. Could his story help other Connecticut veterans with less than honorable discharges? 

Eleanor Roosevelt (second from left) and Lorena Hickok (far right)
Franklin D. Roosevelt Library / Wikimedia Commons

Eleanor Roosevelt was a woman with a huge historical footprint—First Lady, first U.S. delegate to the United Nations General Assembly. She was dubbed “The First Lady of the World” by Harry Truman. 

But how much is known about Eleanor’s personal life beyond the politics and activism? This hour, we sit down with Connecticut author Amy Bloom. Her new book, White Houses, is a fictional novel that explores Eleanor’s real-life romantic relationship with female journalist Lorena Hickok.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

This hour: a lesson in public history. How are towns and cities across Connecticut and the Northeast engaging residents with the past?

We check in with a team of experts and historians. We look at examples of locally driven projects and initiatives, and consider their impact on community building and sense of place.

Do you feel a strong tie to your community’s history? We want to hear from you. 

Library of Congress

This hour: As Women's History Month draws to a close, we draw attention to a Connecticut native who was integral in the campaign for civil rights -- Judge Constance Baker Motley.

Coming up, we take an in-depth look at Judge Motley's life and talk about her legacy both inside and outside of the courtroom.

Plus: Suzan-Lori Parks’ Father Comes Home From the Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 opened at Yale Repertory Theatre earlier this month.

We learn more about the production and find out how the Theatre’s ongoing WILL POWER! initiative is exposing students to the arts. 

Christina Carolus

For over a century, Americans have looked to National Geographic to learn about other people and cultures around the world.

Now for the first time ever, the magazine has acknowledged its “exotic” portrayals of other cultures, which it was known for during much of its history, were based on racist ideas.

tanjila ahmed/flickr creative commons

Massachusetts is rolling out legal recreational marijuana sales this summer, with pot shops scheduled to open in July.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

The November midterms are fast-approaching -- raising concerns about election security and the safeguarding of local voter identity.

This hour, we look at how Connecticut is responding with Secretary of the State Denise Merrill.

Plus: a Middletown-based prison program gives incarcerated adults the opportunity to work towards an Associate degree behind bars.

We learn about the Wesleyan Center for Prison Education and its recent degree-granting collaboration with Middlesex Community College.

And finally: Have recent weather reports left you feeling underwhelmed? Don’t be upset with your local forecaster, says Quinnipiac University professor Ben Bogardus.

Coming up, Bogardus joins us along with NBC Connecticut Chief Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan. And we want to hear from you. 

Samite playing flute
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Samite Mulondo went from a refugee camp in Kenya to collaborating with Paul Simon. This hour, the musician and Uganda native joins us in the studio to share his story and his music.

Mohd Fazlin Mohd Effendy Ooi Follow / Creative Commons

This hour, we discuss the debate concerning a woman’s right to abort her fetus following a Down syndrome diagnosis.

We also look at how advances in medical technology have changed the way health professionals screen for the a genetic disorder during pregnancy.

How far has prenatal testing progressed? And where is it headed? We find out.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

They've gone years without a raise. Now, members of Connecticut's private group home workforce are calling for a boost in support from the state.

With a possible strike looming this April, we speak to Josh Kovner from the Hartford Courant for an update. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This week will mark six months since Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, devastating the island.

Since the storm, thousands of Puerto Ricans have moved to Connecticut to restart their lives. This hour, we hear some of their stories as we take stock of the continuing impact of the hurricane.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Catherine Smith is Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Economic and Community Development. This hour, she stops by for an update on the state's economy and manufacturing workforce.

Later, we also check in with Goodwin College President Mark Scheinberg. How is his school training the next generation of manufacturing employees? We find out and we also hear from you. 

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