Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a talk show about where we live in Connecticut, in New England, in the United States, and on the planet. It's also a show about who we are, and our place in the world.

Where We Live is a call-in show, so on any given day, listeners can join the conversation with elected officials and policy experts on a wide array of topics: from immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We also explore the latest scientific research, changes in the health care system, and how the effects of worldwide events like climate change impact us locally.

We take time to highlight our diverse communities and their contributions, including the arts and music. We take your questions, and we want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The State of Connecticut operates a Veterans’ Home on 92 acres in Rocky Hill. Many of its residents were once homeless or in danger of homelessness. But a lot of the buildings are outdated and in need of major improvements.

This hour, we find out what a recent consultant's report says about ways the state can better use the property to serve veterans. 

Crystal Emery

This hour, New Haven-based filmmaker Crystal Emery takes us behind the scenes of her new documentary  "Black Women in Medicine." We meet some of the women profiled in her film, and discuss recent efforts to increase diversity in the science and medical fields. 

Naval Submarine Base New London

For a century, Groton, Connecticut has been home to the Naval Submarine Base and Training School. It’s turned into an economic staple for the region with the presence of manufacturer Electric Boat. The state is celebrating one hundred years as the "Submarine Capital of the World." This hour, we discuss the history of the submarine industry and how it fares today. Even after all these years, the vessels continue to play an important role in U.S. military strategy.

Andrew Love / Creative Commons

Are you feeling overburdened by student loan payments or the growing stack of credit card bills on your kitchen table? If you answered "yes" to either of those questions, you're not alone (especially if you're a young American).

Lennart Tange / Creative Commons

If you're allergic to it, you might be cursing pollen in between sneezes right now. But the process of pollination is essential to plant, animal, and human life. All sorts of insects and animals can be pollinators including bats, bees, moths, butterflies, birds, and even lemurs!

Thomas Hawk / WNPR

A new report commissioned by two Connecticut organizations looks at the challenges children face when their parents are in prison. This hour, we check in with one of those groups -- the Connecticut Association for Human Services -- to see what they found and how they plan on using the results to guide future policy conversations. We also hear from a college student whose father spent nearly a decade behind bars.

Waterbury Public Schools

Jahana Hayes is a history teacher at John F. Kennedy High School in Waterbury, Connecticut. She's also the 2016 National Teacher of the Year. This hour, she stops by to talk about her career, her new national title, and her recent visit to the White House

fruity monkey / Creative Commons

Paid leave has been a hot-button issue on the campaign trail and in the Connecticut legislature. Earlier this year, state lawmakers considered a bill that would have established mandatory paid family and medical leave for private employees. That bill, however, died in the Senate. 

Alberto Cairo / ProPublica

A few years ago,  a public outcry forced schools to re-examine their use of seclusion and restraints among students. This hour, we have a conversation with the Office of the Child Advocate about the use of restraints and seclusion in schools. We also hear from a parent of a developmentally disabled student about the challenges she faces in her child’s public school education.

Gloda/iStock / Thinkstock

There's a debate in West Hartford over plans by a for-profit company to open an educational academy for Chinese students in town. The plan would include sending some students to the public high schools.

What are the pros and cons in allowing international students into our public schools at a time when districts face declining enrollment and budget constraints? Is this a creative way to fund public schools or is it detrimental to their mission? 

Martin Garrido / Creative Commons

America's Asian population is growing faster than any other racial group in the country. According to the White House, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders will account for nearly ten percent of all U.S. residents by the year 2050. So why, then, don’t we hear more about them in our communities? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

WNPR is launching a new series on the heroin epidemic gripping the state. This hour, we hear from one of the reporters leading the investigation.

Also, the state's ongoing budget problems are causing problems for a lot more people than just number crunchers and policy wonks. We check in with two former state employees who lost their jobs in a recent round of layoffs.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's John Dankosky's final episode before Lucy Nalpathanchil takes over as the new host of Where We Live. This hour, we remember some of our favorite moments -- and mishaps -- on the show. We also meet a longtime listener and caller, whose voice will probably sound very familiar to you... it's Derrick from Windsor, Connecticut! 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Where We Live is much more than a show about place, it's a show about people -- about you, our listeners. Your stories, comments, and questions have meant so much to us over the past ten years, which is why we’re using this hour to get your feedback. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state legislature heads into overtime to discuss (and hopefully pass) a budget that was partially unveiled nearly a week after the regular session ended.

This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will discuss how things operated during this legislative session. We also recap the Democratic and Republican state conventions where (eventually) all reporters were credentialed to cover the proceedings if they wanted to. But this has us thinking about the press and the 2016 election overall this year. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ten years ago, Democratic political newcomer Ned Lamont launched a bid to unseat his party’s incumbent U.S. senator. He defeated Joe Lieberman in the primary and brought national political attention to Connecticut. But 2006 was also the year that our show launched. This hour, we look back at that campaign with Lamont and talk about what has happened in the state and country since then. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Dr. Gail Christopher has been a crusader for better health outcomes in America, championing an idea that “place matters,” finding that the way people live in some communities puts them at a much higher risk for disease. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Kate Callahan has been a fixture of the Connecticut music scene for years -- and now she's got a title to prove it. Earlier this year the singer-songwriter was named Connecticut’s 16th State Troubadour

Andrew Love / Creative Commons

Are you feeling overburdened by student loan payments or the growing stack of credit card bills on your kitchen table? If you answered "yes" to either of those questions, you're not alone (especially if you're a young American).

Krissy Venosdale / Creative Commons

In his State of the State address, Governor Dan Malloy asked legislators not to wait until the last day of the session to pass a budget. At the time, lawmakers gave him a standing ovation. Flash forward a few months to the waning hours of the regular session, and what still needs to be passed? The state budget.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Flickr Creative Commons

New York's Indian Point nuclear facility has faced a number of recent incidents including fires, blown transformers, and most recently detection of radioactive water near the facility. This hour, an update on the situation there and in Florida where the Turkey Point nuclear facility is under scrutiny.

We also hear from WNPR’s David DesRoches, who has been following the story of PCBs in Connecticut schools and in Alabama.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spent the better part of two decades dreaming up a museum with a highly specific, slightly bizarre theme: tort law. In late 2015, that dream became a reality with the opening of the American Museum of Tort Law in downtown Winsted, Connecticut.

Stephen Voss / NPR

In 2013, the unexpected departure of NPR CEO Gary Knell left the network, once again, in desperate need of a leader. So the board tapped Jarl Mohn -- a long-time philanthropist and media executive -- to step in and take the reins.

David Ohmer / Creative Commons

For the United States, the 20th century marked a period of vast and unparalleled prosperity thanks -- in large part -- to an economic model known as the “mixed economy.” Under that model, the nation's government and markets operated in tandem, creating a robust coalition from which health, wealth, and well-being not only grew, but flourished. 

Bruce Tuten / Creative Commons

"Acela" primary day has come and gone for five Northeast states, including Connecticut. This hour, we recap the results with a panel of reporters and political experts. Which candidates picked up momentum? And, on the Republican side, was it enough to avoid a contested convention?