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Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Last week, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting next year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up: We sit down with Chuck Collins, senior scholar at the Washington, D.C.-based Institute for Policy Studies.

But first: A look at how researchers are working to preserve the world's most endangered languages -- including locally-based efforts to expand fluency of the Mohegan language

David Tipling / Yale University Press

The days have gotten shorter and the leaves continue to change -- all signs autumn is definitely here. But for animals, the beginning of fall means undertaking major lifestyle changes -- in order to survive the winter.

alkruse24 / Creative Commons

Sixteen years after the U.S. entered into war with Afghanistan -- a look at one woman's efforts to inform and inspire young Afghan girls.

This hour, Shabana Basij-Rasikh talks about her upbringing under the Taliban in Kabul and about her experience co-founding SOLA -- the School of Leadership, Afghanistan

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults do not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

During the 1920’s, some Connecticut women took jobs painting watch dials with radium-laced paint. At the time, they didn’t know it was toxic. As these so-called “Radium Girls” began to die, their stories became part of a rallying cry for industrial regulation.

WNPR

Russian hacking, fake news--if the last election  taught us anything, it’s that your vote is a valuable commodity.

Mario Roberto Durán Ortiz / Wikimedia Commons

More than 50 are dead and more than 500 injured in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. On Sunday night, a gunman in a Las Vegas high rise hotel fired hundreds of rounds of ammunition on thousands of  concertgoers.

wikimedia

With the threat of nuclear weapons from North Korea, questions about the future of the Iran nuclear deal, and more aggressive, nationalistic rhetoric coming from the U.S president -- could we see nukes being used again?

Ken Cedeno / International Medical Corps

Most of Puerto Rico still has no power or running water one week after Hurricane Maria devastated the island.

Jon Olson

Six years ago she became the first female to lead the Hartford Symphony Orchestra. This hour, Carolyn Kuan talks about her intricate journey to the Connecticut stage.

It's the latest in WNPR's "Making Her Story" series, recorded live at the Warner Theatre in Torrington, Connecticut. 

Mamma Loves / Creative Commons

Pregnancy and childbirth bring on a range of emotions -- from excitement, to exhaustion, to the stress of physical pain.

Few, however, expect these experiences to result in human tragedy -- especially not in the death of a new or soon-to-be mother

This hour: the realities of maternal health and mortality. We check in with a team of doctors and reporters, and we also hear from you.

Maisa Tisdale

Within the shadow of P.T. Barnum lies a much quieter tale of Bridgeport prosperity -- a tale involving two nineteenth-century sisters, Mary and Eliza Freeman.

While neither achieved the same level of recognition as Barnum, both established a significant place within the history of Connecticut’s Park City. 

John Pavelka / Creative Commons

In his first address to the United Nations, President Trump used fighting words to respond to North Korea.

CTVisit.com

Still Revolutionary”… or stuck in a rut?

This hour -- in the midst of budget woes and major business losses -- we find out what Connecticut can and should be doing to bolster its image on the national stage. 

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