Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a talk show about where we live in Connecticut, in New England, in the United States, and on the planet. It's also a show about who we are, and our place in the world.

Where We Live is a call-in show, so on any given day, listeners can join the conversation with elected officials and policy experts on a wide array of topics: from immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We also explore the latest scientific research, changes in the health care system, and how the effects of worldwide events like climate change impact us locally.

We take time to highlight our diverse communities and their contributions, including the arts and music. We take your questions, and we want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined, a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

Nicole Marie Photoworks / Flickr Creative Commons

Spring has sprung, and with that comes gardening season! Are you thinking about how to get your garden ready? 

This hour, we talk garden trends, soil prep, pruning, pest management, managing invasives, supporting pollinators, and so much more.

Heather Brandon and Mary Lou Cooke digital illustration / Chion Wolf photo / Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum photo / WNPR / Creative Commons

As a sitting governor running for re-election in 2014, Dannel Malloy gave himself a nickname on Where We Live.

"You don't have to love me," said Malloy. "I'm a porcupine." The public is being reminded of Malloy's prickly side as he moves forwards with state employee layoffs. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses the jobs cuts and what impact they will have on the state's residents.

sima dimitric / Creative Commons

America’s elderly population is growing, and so is the number of older adults with mental health needs. According to the American Psychological Association, between 20 and 25 percent of adults aged 65 and older have a mental health disorder. Yet reports show only a small fraction are receiving the kind of specialized professional care they need.  

Robert Markowitz and Bill Stafford / NASA Robonaut Lab

The U.S. and world economies were revolutionized by globalization and later by the digital revolution. What's coming next? This hour, we sit down with someone who has an idea of what's to come. Alec Ross served as Senior Advisor for Innovation to then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He tells us how emerging fields like robotics and genomics are changing the way we live and work.

Tom Berry

Later this month, Yale Cabaret will cast its spotlight on a unique "troupe" of New Haven performers: veterans and refugees who experienced the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from very different places. This hour, we hear their stories and learn about their play "Voices from the Long War." 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Wikimedia Commons

Few of us remember Hurricane Ike as vividly as we remember Katrina and Sandy. But for people down in Houston, Texas, the 2008 storm was a major wake-up call. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

This week, Governor Dannel Malloy was announced as the winner of the 2016 John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for his response to the Syrian refugee crisis. It adds to Malloy's national popularity, despite the political struggles in Hartford.

Astro / Creative Commons

A few weeks ago we held a conversation about the n-word -- how the word is used by black and white Americans; how it's been used by newspapers over time; and how one professor would like to see it stop being used altogether. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Rep. Joe Courtney joins us to talk about what he's working on in Washington, D.C. for his constituents in eastern Connecticut. One national issue hitting his district particularly hard is the heroin epidemic. What is the federal government's role in combating this problem? 

Also, the U.S. Navy announced this week that Electric Boat would be the main contractor for a new submarine program. How's the health of the rest of the defense industry in the region?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spent the better part of two decades dreaming up a museum with a highly specific, slightly bizarre theme: tort law. In late 2015, that dream became a reality with the opening of the American Museum of Tort Law in downtown Winsted, Connecticut. 

Adavyd / Creative Commons

In his February budget address, Gov. Dannel Malloy outlined the challenges facing the state government. "Connecticut state government must reset our expectations of what we can afford, how we provide services, and how we save for our priorities," said Malloy. "It won't be easy, and it often won't be politically popular." That last part is becoming increasingly evident.

David Ohmer / Creative Commons

For the United States, the 20th century marked a period of vast and unparalleled prosperity thanks -- in large part -- to an economic model known as the “mixed economy.” Under that model, the nation's government and markets operated in tandem, creating a robust coalition from which health, wealth, and well-being not only grew, but flourished. 

DC Central Kitchen / Creative Commons

They say it's important to eat breakfast every day. But what if you eat two breakfasts?

According to a new study, students who eat two breakfasts -- one at home and one at school -- are less likely to experience unhealthy weight gain than students who skip the meal altogether

Universities didn’t always have power-house fundraising foundations supporting them - they came into popularity in the Reagan-era economy when government drastically cut higher education funding, so more and more schools had to turn to private donors.

Jamelle Bouie / Creative Commons

During his speech in Cuba, President Barack Obama described just how different this year's presidential race is from those in previous generations. "You had two Cuban Americans in the Republican Party, running against the legacy of a black man who is President, while arguing that they’re the best person to beat the Democratic nominee who will either be a woman or a Democratic Socialist," said Obama.

Adavyd / Creative Commons

Time in the legislative session is starting to run down and the list of things to do remains long. This week on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we’re joined by Capitol reporters to catch us up on what is (and isn’t) getting done. Governor Dannel Malloy is going up against labor unions and asking for concessions to help with the budget but the rank and file union members haven't authorized a renegotiation of the current contract.

Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr Creative Commons

An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

Andrew Ciscel / Creative Commons

What if commuting between Connecticut and Long Island meant hopping into a car and driving through a tunnel deep below Long Island Sound? Sounds far-fetched, right?

Well, if you're New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, you might not think so. And if you're Amtrak, you might think it shouldn't be cars driving under the Sound, but trains connecting the Northeast Corridor

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined, a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

Chuck Kennedy / White House

It's that time of the political season when just about every Tuesday seems like a "Super Tuesday." More voters head to the polls, and on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the results, and take a look at what's ahead for both major political parties.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Creative Commons

New York's Indian Point nuclear facility has faced a number of recent incidents including fires, blown transformers, and most recently detection of radioactive water near the facility. This hour, an update on the situation there and in Florida where the Turkey Point nuclear facility is under scrutiny.

We also hear from WNPR’s David DesRoches, who has been following the story of PCBs in Connecticut schools and in Alabama.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Iason Athanasiadis is a writer, photojournalist, and documentary filmmaker who has spent years covering the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe. He was in Hartford recently to speak to the World Affairs Council of Connecticut, and stopped by our studios to talk about journalism in conflict regions and the Syrian migrant crisis. This hour, we listen back to that conversation.

Nick M / Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we feature stories and sounds from the West African country of Nigeria. 

First, WSHU reporter Ebong Udoma checks in from Abuja, Nigeria, where he's helped launch a brand new multimedia project called Gotel Africa. When completed, Gotel Africa will become the continent's first-ever pan-African news service. We learn more about it. 

In his new documentary, Connecticut journalism professor and newspaper columnist Frank Harris III spotlights what is unarguably one of the most controversial words in America: the n-word.

JasonParis. / Creative Commons

This hour, our news roundtable The Wheelhouse tackles some of the biggest political stories of the week. We discuss everything from state budget cuts, to automatic voter registration, to a "legislative mystery" that's got everyone asking: Who added language to the SEEC's bill? 

Charles Williams / Creative Commons

This hour -- from Maine to New Hampshire; Vermont to Massachusetts -- we learn how some of our New England neighbors are working to stem opioid addiction and overdose. 

NicoleMariePhotoworks/ Flickr Creative Commons

Spring is just around the corner, and with that comes gardening season! Are you thinking about how to get your garden ready? 

Sam Petherbridge / Creative Commons

Like most of the media landscape, public television is changing. The massive hit Downton Abbey wraps up this weekend, and Sesame Street is now premiering new episodes on HBO! But behind the scenes, broadcasters are taking part in an auction to sell of parts of their over-the-air signal. Most of the population has cable so they won’t be affected, but nearly 15 percent of people watch TV with an antennae.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

Few of us remember Hurricane Ike as vividly as we remember Katrina and Sandy. But for people down in Houston, Texas, the 2008 storm was a major wake-up call. 

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