WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Winning

Mar 14, 2011
D. Basu, Creative commons

You can win the peace, win the future, win the game, win the lottery, or if you’re Charlie Sheen you can just be “A Winner.”

You’ve heard variations on the saying, “Winning isn’t everything…it’s the only thing.”  Motivational, to be sure – but when winning is the only goal, does that make most of us “losers?

Creative Commons

Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey are all talking about taxes and public sector unions.

It’s a different kind of conversation in the Northeast than they’re having in say, Wisconsin - but the rhetoric is still kind of hot.

Dannel Malloy dubbed himself the “Anti-Christie” (take that New Jersey!) and then got a nice write-up in the New York Times for what they called a “Better Budget” proposal without bombast.

DMahendra, Creative Commons

Today, Long Island Congressman, Peter King, holds a hearing called "The Extent of Radicalization in the American Muslim Community and that Community's Response."

As chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, King says he wants to look into the threat of homegrown terrorism and its ties to Islam.

Casey Serin

On the day Illinois is expected to abolish the death  penalty, Connecticut lawmakers are grappling with the same question.

Democrats in this state who want to repeal the law allowing executions feel this is their year - with a Governor who says he’ll sign a “prospective” law.  But many people from both parties want to keep the punishment as a tool for prosecutors.

National Geographic

Could it be true?!  The lost city of Atlantis has been found!  Well, not yet, but a University of Hartford archeologist is on the case.

Farai Chideya

Mar 7, 2011

Farai Chideya has been following the intersections of race and gender, pop culture and politics for years.  During the 2010 campaign, she hosted a series of election specials for public radio in association with her blog, “pop and politics” – where she traveled the country, talking to voters about their lives and what drives their votes.  She joined us to talk about African American women in politics.

Muhammad Yunus won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for his work pioneering the concept of “micro credit,” providing small loans to village entrepreneurs as a way to fight poverty. 

Last weekend the Waterbury Arts Magnet School performed the Tony award-winning Joe Turner’s Come and Gone by the Pulitzer prize-winner August Wilson – a celebrated play that was first staged in1984 at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Connecticut.

The play almost didn’t happen, though.  A month ago, production was temporarily stopped, when questions were raised about the frequent use of a racially charged slang term…the so called “n-word.” 

Mills Baker, Creative Commons

More than 336,000 residents of Connecticut use food stamps – up over 30% in the past year. 

This program, now known as SNAP - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs – provides an average of $263 a month for each household on the program. 

Chion Wolf, WNPR

In 1961, Estelle Griswold, president of Planned Parenthood League of Connecticut, opened a birth control clinic to dispense contraceptives -- a bold act of civil disobedience that changed the course of the history of family planning legislation. 

It resulted in the 1965 case of Griswold v. Connecticut, where the US Supreme Court removed one of the last serious barriers to family planning. 

FrankJuarez / Creative Commons

Leadership in school districts is more important than ever before – as schools struggle to fulfill local educational needs, while paying close attention to edicts from the federal government.  

Then, of course, there’s the job of finding the money to do it all…while dealing with politics, parents and issues of student achievement which may not all be under your control. 

Today, where we live, we’ll look at the job of superintendent, and ask what it takes to find the right leader in the schools to run your “race to the top.”

Emerging Adults

Feb 28, 2011
archie4oz, creative commons

Step aside “quarter life crisis” -  there’s a new term for 20-somethings in that transition phase of their lives.  He calls it “emerging adulthood”

Dr. Jeffrey Arnett claims that in the past half century, the experience of people aged 18 to 29 has changed dramatically - at least in some societies.

Most young people now postpone marriage and parenthood until at least their late twenties, and spend their late teens through their mid-20s in self-focused exploration, trying out different possibilities in love and work.

woodleywonderworks, creative commons

Governor Malloy is pushing to increase the minimum age for kindergarten, hoping to close the achievement gap and raise test scores.

The state's plan is simple. To enter kindergarten, a child would need to turn 5 by October first...rather than the current date of January 1. The bill would also keep 7-year-olds out of kindergarten. It means more kids are closer to the same age- something that would make sense for a lot of schools.

Sue Clark, Creative Commons

Gun Control

Feb 22, 2011
westside shooter / Creative Commons

It’s been a little more than a month since the shooting of a congresswoman made the nation stop and really think about how it talks about guns.  Well, that didn’t last long.

Here’s a case in point:  When New Haven Mayor John DeStefano announced that he's laying off some city employees, including police, it prompted protests by officers. 

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