WNPR

Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the senior producer:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

In the late 1960s, jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd sold millions of records by tapping in to the psychedelic sounds of the days

He achieved a “superstar” status, unfamiliar to jazz musicians today, thanks to the cross-over appeal of this soulful and experimental music.  His 1967 album, “Forest Flower” was one of the biggest selling jazz records of all time.  

Chion Wolf

We keep hearing that “small business” is what's going to drive an economic recovery.  But I have a question:  What is a small business anyway?

The Small Business Administration says anything under 500 employees is the number - but that's depending on the industry. The state’s jobs bill last year says it's under 50 employees, although most economists seem to agree under 100 is a more realistic and inclusive measurement.

Chion Wolf

New statistics show that union membership in America has slipped again…reaching its lowest rate in more than 70 years. 

New Haven Independent

Yann Beaullan’s mother is Jewish; his father is Cambodian. He grew up listening to Buddhist chants. On Sunday he was worshiping in Wooster Square—to the strains of alto saxes offering Coltranesque riffs on the Christian hymn “Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow.”

Beaullan has joined what might be called a “happening” new phenomenon in the pews: a weekly jazz-style eucharist that is transforming St. James and St. Paul’s from one of the “frozen chosen” Episcopal churches in town to one of the coolest places to worship in New Haven.

Denise Merrill

Jan 24, 2011
Chion Wolf

Democrat Denise Merrill has taken over a tough job – as the new Secretary of the State.

The end of Susan Bysiewicz’ long career in the job was marked by a confusing, close election for Governor – compounded by a ballot controversy in Bridgeport.

It has some people calling for a new law that would mandate one ballot for every registered voter.  New Secretary Denise Merrill says she’s not sure that’s the right solution - but she has said she’ll be working with lawmakers, “capitalizing” on the relationships she formed as House Majority leader.

Spike & Jones

Recently a compilation came out covering 50 years of African music, an 18 CD compilation of 185 songs.  Many of these tracks crossed borders and helped build a new global awareness of Africa.  

A New City Plan

Oct 29, 2010
Chion Wolf

The underlying theme this month (right after the elections, of course) is transportation. It seems much-anticipated changes are slowly happening, on the national and local level.  This week, Connecticut and Massachusetts announced that they will share nearly 121 million in federal funds to help launch high speed passenger rail service.  One step closer to the long awaited Springfield – New Haven rail line. 

If you've noticed the political campaigns this year, they haven't exactly been rich with issues and evidence.   You're more likely to hear emotions, anger, empathy and fear. This is the world that Drew Westen studies. He is professor of psychology and psychiatry at Emory University, and author of The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation (2007), an  investigation into the role of emotion in determining the political life of the nation.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Terrorist plots on U.S. soil, and terrorist acts around the world, are blamed on “radical” strains of Islam. But what are the causes of “radicalization,” and how can they be reversed? A conference this month in East Hartford brings together leading thinkers and writers – tackling the topics of violent extremism, the U.S. relationship with Pakistan and Pakistani Americans, and ways in which the Muslim community here is helping to weed out terrorism.

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