Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a talk show about where we live in Connecticut, in New England, in the United States, and on the planet. It's also a show about who we are, and our place in the world.

Where We Live is a call-in show, so on any given day, listeners can join the conversation with elected officials and policy experts on a wide array of topics: from immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We also explore the latest scientific research, changes in the health care system, and how the effects of worldwide events like climate change impact us locally.

We take time to highlight our diverse communities and their contributions, including the arts and music. We take your questions, and we want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

sanjitbakshi / Creative Commons

Earlier this year, members of the United Nations met in New Canaan, Connecticut for a workshop on how countries can fight human trafficking.

Tax Credits / Creative Commons

A Superior Court Judge ruled last week that Connecticut’s system for funding public schools is ‘irrational’ and ‘unjustifiable’ — failing to provide a fair distribution of funds for Connecticut’s students. The judge allowed the state 180 days to come up with a plan to overhaul its system.

This hour, we talk more about the ruling and find out what, if anything, can be done to improve the way our schools are funded. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. This hour, we hear from two people whose lives were forever changed by the tragedy. 

John Atashian / Judy Dworin Performance Project, Inc.

“Brave in a New World” premieres next week, September 15, at the Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts — weaving spoken word and dance around the experiences of ex-offenders and their families. It’s the latest piece from the Judy Dworin Performance Project.

This hour, we hear about the upcoming artistic performance that digs deep into what it means to live in prison — and what it means to leave.

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From self-driving cars to 3D printing to hydrokinetic energy technology, New Englanders are at the forefront of the latest cutting edge tech. 

This hour, we explore the latest gadgets and tech trends and learn about their impact locally and around the globe.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Audio Pending...

Second chances are often talked about in relation to conversations about prison reform, but rarely do we hear from those who actually need them. This hour, we take a look at Connecticut’s “Second Chance Society” through the eyes of a former inmate

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Four years ago, Connecticut became the 17th state to legalize medical marijuana. By 2014, the state officially launched its medical marijuana program, making it possible for card-holding patients to buy the drug legally. This hour, we get an update on that program from Connecticut's Department of Consumer Protection Commissioner Jonathan Harris. We also hear from a Connecticut woman who saw how the program helped her husband, and we check in with doctors and dispensaries in the state. 

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As traditional college graduates shoulder large student loan debt and companies hunt for skilled labor, technical and vocational high schools are garnering more attention. Do skills like 3D printing and precision machining really help students get jobs and higher wages?

This hour, we explore the value of career and technical education in Connecticut and nationwide.

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Recently we did a show about the science of loving where you live and we heard from plenty of Connecticut residents who really do love living here. But that sentiment is not shared by everyone. Some residents say high taxes are driving them away to places like Florida and North Carolina.

This hour, we talk about out-migration from Connecticut. We also explore the number of people who are moving into the state — what’s known as in-migration. And we want to hear from you. Are you looking to leave Connecticut once you retire? If not, why do you want to stay here?  

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut is home to many historic landmarks -- among them is the former residence of American architect and icon Philip Johnson. Since it opened to the public in 2007, Johnson's Glass House has welcomed thousands of visitors from across the country and around the world. 

Mary Anne Williams

Your home is one of your biggest investments, but some Connecticut residents are seeing that investment crumble because of failing foundations. This hour, we find out what the state is doing to help those whose homes and futures are -- quite literally -- falling apart beneath them. 

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Connecticut’s early settlers came to this region in part for our fertile farmland — but what is the state of farming in Connecticut today?

This hour, we explore agriculture in the Nutmeg State.

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Why are some people more susceptible to addiction than others? How does genetic makeup influence a person’s chances of becoming an addict? This hour, we find out how researchers at Yale University and The Jackson Laboratory are working to better understand the science of addiction. 

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Five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease -- the sixth leading cause of death in this country. There are many caregivers who provide unpaid care for their relatives with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementias -- but it’s not an easy role to fill.

This hour, we explore caregiving and how it can impact a person’s physical and emotional health -- and their finances. 

alancleaver_2000 / Creative Commons

Twenty-five years after it was first levied, what has the income tax done for Connecticut? This hour, we take a deeper look at this controversial tax -- including its impact on our state's economic and fiscal well-being.

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When was the last time you changed your address? Well, if you're like most Americans, it probably wasn't that long ago. According to the Census Bureau, the average U.S. resident will move 11.7 times in his or her lifetime. This hour, we take a closer look at why we're on the move so much. What does it take to truly feel at home where you live? It's something journalist Melody Warnick writes about in her new book called This Is Where You Belong

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Illicit use of prescription drugs has almost tripled among high school students in southeastern Connecticut. That's according to the Southeastern Regional Action Council.

Shane Adams / Creative Commons

Hissing sprinklers, humming mowers, buzzing weed whackers: the quintessential sounds of summer are also symbols of an American mission -- to craft the so-called “perfect lawn.”

This hour, we trace the history of American lawn culture and explore some of the latest turf trends. From trimming, to fertilizing, to xeriscaping, we want to hear from you. How do you care for your lawn during these hot, dry summer months? 

Sean McMenemy / Creative Commons

Most people know that at the DMV you can register your car, get new license plates and obtain a driver’s license. But did you know you can register to vote? Beginning this week, if you’re renewing your license or getting a Connecticut issued ID, you’ll be asked if you want to register to vote at the same time.

This hour, we talk with Secretary of State Denise Merrill about this new voter registration system. We also ask her about the local primaries that took place on Tuesday, and the latest Election Performance Index from the Pew Charitable Trust that ranked Connecticut fifth in the nation.

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As the oldest part of our country, New England has dozens of historic house museums. These famous living quarters tell the stories of the early colonists, prominent artists, social activists and influential authors. They give us a glimpse into these icons' daily lives.

But historic house museums aren’t just about old dining rooms and fine china. This hour, we learn about how some museums are trying new and creative approaches to tell the stories of the past, to keep visitors coming through their doors, and to keep donors enthusiastic. 

milindri/iStock / Thinkstock

Last month, several of Connecticut's 911 dispatch centers experienced temporary system outages. The blackouts occurred amid a multi-million-dollar upgrade to the state's legacy infrastructure -- an effort that has since been put on hold. This hour, we take a closer look at what happened and consider what's being done to bring 911 technology into the 21st century

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Connecticut is among the least religious states in the country according to the Pew Research Center. While the number of churchgoers might not be high, religion is a pillar of our state’s history.

Faith in Connecticut is rich and diverse, but this hour, we zoom in on our Puritan past and find out how, if at all, that past still influences our communities today. We speak to a professor and historian and we get the perspective of a pastor from the United Church of Christ -- a protestant denomination that can trace its roots to the Puritan religion. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we discuss Governor Malloy's Second Chance 2.0 legislation and find out why it failed to pass during the 2016 session. We also look at what some Connecticut communities are doing to support re-entry. And we talk to a local restaurant owner about his decision to hire ex-offenders

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The Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil kick off on Friday, and here in Connecticut, our state’s large Brazilian community will be watching far from home. This hour, we learn more about why so many Brazilians come to the Nutmeg State and why it’s hard to say exactly how many Brazilians live here.

Doug Butchy / Creative Commons

At 220 years old, Hartford’s Old State House is a relic from the past. It’s even thought to be inhabited by ghosts from our state’s history. But this Connecticut treasure is now closed to the public and it may even lose its historic memorabilia -- the result of the state’s ongoing budget problems. This hour, we examine the history of the Old State House and discuss what the future holds for the building