Where We Live

Weekdays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live, hosted by John Dankosky, is a talk show about where we live in Connecticut, in New England, in the United States, and on the planet (sometimes even beyond).

On any given day, you can hear interviews with elected officials, roundtables on transportation and infrastructure, the latest scientific breakthroughs, changes in the health care system, education in the 21st century, the effects of worldwide events like climate change on our local communities, and music played live by a diverse array of local artists.

We also take questions and hear stories from you and your neighbors doing amazing things to improve life in our cities and towns.

You can join the conversation every day on Where We Live, where we bring you radio with a sense of place.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It’s the 2015 finale to our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, and what a year it’s been. From the unlikely return of Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, to ongoing discussions about a new casino, the news kept us on our toes. This hour, we recap not only the week’s news, but the year’s news with our panel and you can join the conversation with the stories that mattered most to you.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

National security expert Scott Bates recently returned from Amman, Jordan where he was working with government ministries and elected officials on a project funded by USAID. This hour, he stops by tell us more about his trip and discuss United States foreign policy in the Middle East. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

There was a whole lot of music released in 2015 and there never seems to be enough time to listen to it all. That’s where the "Internet’s Busiest Music Nerd" comes in. Anthony Fantano's YouTube channel for "The Needle Drop" has over half a million subscribers and he released more than 200 video reviews just this year alone! He stopped by our studios to share some of his favorite songs of the year from hip-hop to Björk and everything in between.

Torrenegra / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been 22 years since The New York Times lost Jeffrey Schmalz -- a young, fearless journalist who pushed the boundaries of AIDS reporting in 20th-century America. 

Seinfeld / NBC

It's time to air your grievances about the news of 2015. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will convene for the first time ever on the Costanza-invented holiday of Festivus! We have lots of grievances, but what do you want to speak up about? Who should participate in the feats of strength?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Earlier this month, the Partnership for Strong Communities released its annual report on housing access and affordability in Connecticut. This hour, we find out what it tells us about local housing conditions -- including efforts to end homelessness and increase affordable housing supply across the state. 

Rennett Stowe / Flickr Creative Commons

Young people coming out of college today have a strong desire to do good in the world, but it’s not easy to find jobs with a social purpose. Instead, many are starting their own businesses, combining an entrepreneurial spirit with a social mission.

Horia Varlan / Creative Commons

Here's a riddle for you: What's green and yellow, but most often red?

...Give up? It's a traffic light -- you know, those things you hit on your way into the office each morning. 

But how do they work? And why don't they ever seem to be synched up? 

This hour, we explore the science behind traffic light programming. We hear from engineers and experts in Connecticut and Utah. We also find out how new "smart" signals are improving traffic flow in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Helder Mira / Connecticut College

The national conversations about race and racism; police and African Americans; free speech on college campuses; “safe spaces” and hate speech and political correctness have all come together in very interesting and interlocked ways here in Connecticut recently.

Donkey Hotey / Flickr

Republican presidential hopefuls debate for the first time since the Paris attacks and San Bernardino shootings and national security is on the forefront of national discussion. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the latest debate in the long road to the White House. There was more of a clear divide between some candidates, especially surrounding military spending and intelligence gathering.

rick / Creative Commons

Did you know that roughly one-third of the food we produce each year is either lost or wasted? This hour, Food Foolish co-author John Mandyck tells us how reducing global food waste could help mitigate the stresses of hunger, water shortages, and climate change. 

Central Connecticut State University

Faculty at Connecticut's state universities are negotiating with the Board of Regents over a new three-year contract. Last month the new president of the Board, Mark Ojakian joined us to discuss the negotiations from his perspective. This hour, we hear from several of the professors pushing back against cuts and other changes in the public higher education system.

Lindsay Zier-Vogel / The Love Lettering Project

When was the last time you sent a letter? Not an email, but a real, tangible piece of mail? If your answer is "not recently," you’re not alone.

Except for the occasional birthday or holiday card, most of us haven’t sent -- or received -- good, old-fashioned snail mail in a very long time. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been three years since saxophonist Jimmy Greene lost his six-year-old daughter, Ana, in the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. On his album, Beautiful Life, Greene memorializes his little girl. It was recently nominated for two Grammy Awards.

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

The national political conversation has shifted to a focus on security, guns, and terrorism. Our weekly political news roundtable The Wheelhouse will discuss the shift and the role Connecticut's congressional delegation has played in the national dialogue.

How does this resonate among Connecticut voters, and how might it affect next year's elections?

Geoffrey Fairchild / Flickr Creative Commons

Violent crime in America has been dropping for years, reaching a point in 2012 that was roughly half of what it was in 1993. But that may be changing.

While there are a lot of reasons why violence is spiking, police officers note a growing willingness to use violence to settle minor disputes.

USDA / Creative Commons

Access to health care has improved significantly since Obamacare, with big gains for previously uninsured minorities who were unable to gain access before the law took effect. But insurance isn’t the only barrier to overcome. Entrenched cultural beliefs and the way we deliver care can also limit access.

Arasmus Photo / Creative Commons

Sanctuary cities have become a focus in the national debate on immigration reform. But what are they? Where are they? And how do they affect communities around the country? 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Monday, the first police officer went to trial for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. Just a few days earlier, video was released of a white police officer in Chicago shooting a black man 16 times.

This hour, we talk about race and racism with three people including Hartford resident Gareth Weston, a black man whose own daughter thought he looked like a "bad guy" when wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Lawmakers are gearing up for a special session later this month as leaders continue to discuss a new budget agreement. The whole process is plagued by uncertainty though. How much is the budget shortfall? What corporations will have a presence in the state? Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will have its own budget talk.

Torrenegra / Creative Commons

It’s been twenty-two years since The New York Times lost Jeffrey Schmalz -- a young, fearless journalist who pushed the boundaries of AIDS reporting in twentieth-century America. 

RAYANDBEE / Creative Commons

When you think of drought, what place comes to mind? California? Texas? 

Ruocaled / Creative Commons

Will state lawmakers have a budget deal in place to be thankful for on Thursday? Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will bring you updates from the state capitol where time ticks away for an agreement on how to fix the state budget. 

Dominic Chavez / World Bank

In a 289 to 137 vote last Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a bill that would tighten the vetting process for refugees from Syria and Iraq. The measure passed despite a veto threat from President Barack Obama -- a threat Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan says "baffles" him.

Jessica Hill / AP Photo

The 2011 consolidation of Connecticut’s regional and community colleges hasn’t worked out so well. Administrative costs have gone up, it’s still hard for students to transfer credits from community to four-year colleges, and the system faces budget deficits that will require painful cuts. But a new proposal calling for give backs from employees has unleashed a furious backlash. 

John Bunting / Flickr Creative Commons

In Connecticut, youth unemployment rates are at historic highs, with teenagers being disproportionately affected. This hour, we take a closer look at some of the latest trends and find out what’s being done to help young people find jobs. 

Tax Credits / Flickr Creative Commons

Are you wondering whether to buy or rent a home? Or how much to save for your child’s education? How much should you set aside for retirement, depending on your age? 

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institute

In a special edition of our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we are joined by reporters from Vermont Public Radio to discuss their new radio documentary Becoming Bernie, which will air on WNPR. We discuss the rise of Bernie Sanders and how the Democratic party is responding to his popularity in the 2016 race for president.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

State Republicans have long been asking to be "at the table" in budget negotiations. Now, with a massive deficit, they are finally getting what they wished for and they announced their proposed fixes. "We not only fix the problem we’re in now because that’s our statutory obligation, but we make structural changes so this state can sustain itself not for the next month, not the next six months, but for generations to come," said House minority leader Themis Klarides. 

Rennett Stowe / Creative Commons

Young people coming out of college today have a strong desire to do good in the world, but it’s not easy to find jobs with a social purpose. Instead, many are starting their own businesses, combining an entrepreneurial spirit with a social mission.

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