Weekend Edition Sunday

  • Hosted by Audie Cornish

The program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

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During a sensitive time of global scrutiny surrounding Islam and Muslims, one unexpected image relating to the religion drew a more positive light.

Ali Kadri, a Muslim man living in Brisbane, Australia, posted a picture to his Facebook page last weekend that got the attention of tens of thousands of people. The picture showed Kadri with an imam, taking part in evening prayers at a Mormon church after having been invited to the Christmas program by his Mormon friend Michael Bennallack.

If you typed "Lamar Odom" into the Google search bar this year, you're certainly not alone.

The former NBA player and reality TV star was the most popular search item of the year, Google says.

This Week In Sports: Team Leaders

Dec 20, 2015
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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Exploring the maze-like layout of Manuel's Tavern is like walking through a museum. And, like museums, the bar is up for its first facelift since it opened nearly 60 years ago, meaning it will close down for several months.

"Not much in this room has changed at all since 1956," says Brian Maloof, the youngest son of the bar's original owner.

Brian Maloof took over Manuel's Tavern after his father, Manuel Maloof, a well-known Atlanta Democrat, died in 2004. Now he's leading it through a challenging time.

On-air challenge: Three words will be given, starting with the letters F, B, and I respectively. Find a word that can follow each one to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

Last week's challenge: Name a state capital. Drop one of its letters. The remaining letters can be rearranged to name another major city in the United States. What is it? There are two different answers, and you should find both of them.

Answer: St. Paul (Minn.), Tulsa (Okla.); Salem (Ore.), Mesa (Ariz.)

Earlier this month, fifty students at Boston College gathered to sing Christmas carols — with a twist.

"You tell us to trust, but we know we must, keep walking through a white man's wonderland."

The students sang that parody outside of their school's biannual Board of Trustees luncheon, to highlight the lack of diversity among faculty, the administration and the Boston College Board itself.

They wanted to reach a group of people with a lot of power over decisions, student organizer Sriya Bhattacharyya says.

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The attack in San Bernardino that left 16 people dead, including the shooters, came just five days after the shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs.

This Week In Football

Dec 6, 2015
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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

On-air challenge:

I'm going to give you some 5-letter words. For each one, change the middle letter to two new letters to get a familiar 6-letter word.

Ex. FROND --> FRIEND
1. EARLY
2. TULIP
3. MOURN
4. BROTH
5. LATCH
6. JUROR
7. SCOWL
8. FUTON
9. DEITY
10. EGEST
11. GUSTY
12. HOUSE
13. ORGAN
14. PANDA
15. SLOTH
16. DECOR
17. ALIVE
18. VISOR

Last week's challenge, from listener Adam Cohen of Brooklyn, NY:

What if you could never get a good night's rest? Some low-income people around the world face that challenge. A team of researchers is investigating whether sleep deprivation keeps some in poverty. (This piece originally aired on All Things Considered on Dec. 2, 2015.)

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Every time a violent attack is carried out in the name of Islam, as happened in Paris, Muslims in this country often feel pressure to speak out, to say how extremists have nothing to do with their faith.

We turned to Muslim Americans, who came of age after Sept. 11, to understand how they have managed that kind of pressure, and how it affects their lives and their faith.

In a photo montage, dozens of meteorologists — all women — stand before digitally projected maps of their towns, forecasting the weather as usual. But there's one thing a little strange about the image: Every single one of them is wearing the same dress.

The montage, first posted on meteorologist Jennifer Myers' Facebook page, has since gone viral on the Internet. The image is so striking, it's not hard to see why it's been shared — but why are all these women of weather wearing the same dress in the first place?

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State Rep. John Bel Edwards beat Republican U.S. Sen. David Vitter in Saturday's election, marking a change in the political landscape in the conservative South.

Edwards will be the only Democratic governor in the Deep South, where Republicans dominate politically.

You could almost have predicted the outcome of the race based on the candidates' election night parties. Sen. David Vitter was set up at a hotel near the airport, while John Bel Edwards lodged in the historic Monteleone Hotel in the French Quarter.

Days of speculation and anxiety followed the Paris attacks. Then, last week, the Paris prosecutor's office confirmed that two of the suicide bombers did pass through Greece last month as part of the wave of refugees fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and Africa.

In the U.S., the emotional debate about whether or not to shut Syrian refugees out altogether gained new traction in presidential politics.

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Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Dear Prudence, also known as Emily Yoffe, has answered questions about everything: deathbed confessions, mysterious boxes in the attic, cheating spouses of course and, once, incestuous twins.

But after nearly a decade as Slate's advice columnist, Yoffe is stepping down. She wrote her last advice column on Thursday.

And now she's passing the baton to Mallory Ortberg, the writer, editor and co-founder of the site The Toast.

On a pristine field at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, 22 men in white pants and cable-knit sweaters take their places. They may be gathered in the U.S. today, but most of the men grew up playing in countries where cricket is serious business.

Tobago, Guyana, India, Scotland — they come from all over. But here, at least, there isn't exactly an abundance of experienced players around. So when they find them, they scoop them up.

That's how Aussie David Anstice got recruited by a teammate.

On-air challenge: For each word, think of a synonym whose first and second letters, in order, are the second and third letters, respectively, of the given word.

For example: Shock --> horrify.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous actor — first and last names. Drop the first two letters of the first name and the last two letters of the last name. Then put a "Y" between what's left of the two names. The result, reading from left to right, will identify who might solve this challenge and play puzzle on the air with me next week.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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