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Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene
  • Local Host Diane Orson

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Editionhosted locally by WNPR's Diane Orson. 

NPR hosts Steve Inskeep, and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. They interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, and present stories from NPR correspondents around the world and WNPR reporters here at home. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Listen for the Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio at 6:50 and 8:50 am for all of the latest business news and insight.

Ways to Connect

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

One day after the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., last December, Liza Long wrote a blog post urging the country to focus on treatment for the nation's mentally ill youth. In it, she shared the story of her own son, "Michael" (not his real name). "I live with a son who is mentally ill," she wrote for The Blue Review.

"Look for a house, barn, paddock, barking dogs and screeching peacocks."

Those were Heidi Feldman's instructions to me to find Down Island Farm in Vineyard Haven on Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

She forgot to mention the ram, free roaming chickens and miniature horse. But I managed to find it anyway.

The unemployment rate only includes people who don't have jobs and are looking for work. A much larger swath of people — about 36 percent of U.S. adults — don't have jobs and aren't looking for work at all. That figure is higher than it's been in decades (and, conversely, the share of adults in the labor force — shown in the graph above — is lower than it's been in decades).

Here are four reasons why so many people are leaving the labor force.

1. They're retiring.

Snowden Leaves Moscow Airport

Aug 1, 2013

Edward Snowden has been granted temporary asylum by Russia and has left the transit zone at Moscow's airport where he has been holed up for more than a month. Morning Edition host Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Corey Flintoff in Moscow and Pentagon correspondent Larry Abramson.

Jobless Aid Falls To New Low

Aug 1, 2013

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NPR's business news starts with unemployment numbers.

No, this is not the big monthly jobs report. We'll get that tomorrow. But this morning one number from the Labor Department - the department announced that applications for jobless benefits fell to 326,000 last week. That is the lowest level since January of 2008. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Bland Meets Dull In Scotland

Aug 1, 2013

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

In the '80s, My Little Pony was a toy line and TV franchise aimed at little girls. Well, today an expanding group of grown men are fans of the pastel-colored ponies. They call themselves Bronies. This weekend, thousands are heading to Baltimore for BronyCon 2013. There'll be music inspired by My Little Pony, Brony Dance-offs, even some academic pony panels. BronyCon began two years ago with a hundred attendees. Like a magical flying pony, the thing's taking off,

Who Will Be The Next Fed Chairman?

Aug 1, 2013

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. This is likely the last day the Senate will be in session until mid-September. Tomorrow members of the House will lave town as well. They're heading out for their August recess with none of the frantic legislative scrambles and deal making that typically end a summer session. Instead, lawmakers seem to be saving their strength for epic battles when they get back. Here's NPR's David Welna.

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In Zimbabwe, polling stations stayed opened late into the night yesterday to allow for the massive turnout of voters who've been waiting in long lines to cast ballots for a president and parliament. But today, the country's main opposition candidate, Morgan Tsvangirai, is claiming intimidation and poll rigging in the election.

There's a hot stock tip floating around Nashville, and it's a first-of-its-kind investment fund that begins trading on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday.

The fund is a collection of stocks in publicly traded companies that have one thing in common: the city they call home.

When people buy into the Nashville Area Exchange Traded Fund — which starts trading at $25 a share — they will essentially be placing a bet based on an area code.

While many of us spend our working days staring into an electronic box or dozing at meetings, there are some who prefer to crawl through tropical rain forests. People like "the astonishing ant man."

That's what his students call Jack Longino. Longino started out collecting stamps in his childhood, but that got boring fast. Man-made things just didn't thrill, so Longino decided to "get small."

As in: "If you're shopping for a home entertainment system," he says, "you can't do better than a good dissecting microscope."

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