Morning Edition

Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Politics
6:46 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Senate Panel To Hear From Fed Chief Nominee Janet Yellen

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 6:53 am

The first woman to be nominated to head the Federal Reserve takes the witness chair on Capitol Hill Thursday morning for her confirmation hearing. Janet Yellen's challenge will be to reassure her Democratic supporters that she's focused on job creation, while convincing at least a few Republicans that she'll keep inflation in check.

Health Care
5:53 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Health Care Registration Numbers Are Revealed

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 6:53 am

The Obama administration says just about 100,000 people managed to choose health plans through the federal and state health exchanges during their first month of the program. Critics say that shows the law is failing. But most analysts say the first month's numbers wouldn't have meant very much, even if the federal website had been working properly.

Asia
5:47 am
Thu November 14, 2013

U.S. Military Helps Transport Typhoon Survivors

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 9:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Stories of survival are emerging from the Philippines after the devastation brought by Typhoon Haiyan. Twenty-three-year-old Marcelo Maloon(ph) was studying nursing in Tacloban, the city hardest hit by the storm. And on the day of the typhoon, Maloon took shelter in a hotel with friends.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Parallels
5:07 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Afghan Farmers: Opium Is The Only Way To Make A Living

An Afghan farmer collects raw opium as he works in a poppy field in Nangarhar province on April 29. Poppy cultivation reached a record high this year despite Western efforts to reduce it.
Noorullah Shirzada AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 8:33 pm

Lashkar Gah is the capital of the volatile province that alone grows half of Afghanistan's opium poppy. Cultivation here grew by 34 percent over last year.

On Fridays, hundreds of men gather at the bazaar along the Helmand River, the lifeblood of this arid province. Vendors sell everything from livestock to boxes of artisanal medicine.

There's no sign of poppy here. In fact, the farmers we talk to like 26-year-old Khairullah, who goes by one name, say they are actually too poor to grow it.

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All Tech Considered
3:08 am
Thu November 14, 2013

How The Sharing Economy Is Changing The Places We Work

Co-workers at Denver's Galvanize, a tech hub in Colorado's capital.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 2:43 pm

This week, we've been reporting on the sharing economy — a term that describes the couch-surfing, car-sharing and community-garden-growing world where so many people are using their existing talents, space or tools.

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Science
3:07 am
Thu November 14, 2013

As Climate Warms American West, Iconic Trout In Jeopardy

Native Westslope cutthroat trout and bull trout swim in the cool waters of the Flathead River near Glacier National Park, Montana.
Jonny Armstrong USGS

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 6:53 am

In the mountain streams of the American West, the trout rules. People don't just catch this fish; they honor it. And spend lots of money pursuing it.

But some western trout may be in trouble. Rivers and streams are getting warmer and there's often less water in them. Scientists suspect a changing climate is threatening this iconic fish.

I joined two such scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey as they drove up a mountain road in Montana, in the northern Rockies, a place dense with stands of Douglas fir and aspen trees and braided with mountain streams.

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All Tech Considered
3:06 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Plastic Guns Made With 3-D Printers Pose New Security Concerns

An all-plastic gun fires a bullet in this screenshot from a video made by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
ATF

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 12:30 pm

Technology helps police solve crimes every day. But some innovations can also present new public safety concerns — and such is the case with guns built using 3-D printers.

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Music Interviews
2:00 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Omar Souleyman: America's Favorite Syrian Wedding Singer

Omar Souleyman's new album, Wenu Wenu, is out now.
Hisham Bharoocha Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 6:53 am

The growing Syrian diaspora streaming out of a country being torn apart includes one of its most popular singers: Omar Souleyman. The musician combines songs of love and desire with driving techno beats, performed on a synthesizer.

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Asia
7:46 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Batman Jailed In Singapore For Stealing Brother's ATM Card

The Singapore man's father is named Suparman. The father named him Batman so that according to local custom he would be called Batman son of Superman — or Batman bin Suparman.

Europe
7:39 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Duke Will Be 'Crowned' For Foreseeable Future

Crowning the Duke of Wellington with a traffic cone is a tradition in Glasgow, Scotland. Frustrated officials wanted to raise the 1844 statue to a height that could keep the cones off the duke's head. Removing them costs the city $160 each time. But the effort to elevate the duke was stopped by a petition.

Boston Trial
5:11 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Victims' Relatives To Face Whitey Bulger At Sentencing Hearing

James "Whitey" Bulger was captured in June 2011 in Santa Monica, Calif., with his longtime girlfriend, Catherine Greig.

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 10:59 am

It's the moment many victims of former Boston mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger have been waiting decades for: In federal court in Boston, relatives of those killed by Bulger will face the former gangster and describe their pain.

Bulger was convicted in August of taking part in 11 murders while running a massive criminal enterprise for decades. There is little suspense around Bulger's sentencing — even the minimum would be enough to send the 84-year-old away for the rest of his life.

To many victims, Wednesday's sentencing hearing is less about Bulger than it is about them.

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Business
5:11 am
Wed November 13, 2013

To Merge, American, U.S. Airways Must Give Up Slots

The Justice Department said the new, combined airline will hand over some slots at key airports to low-cost competitors to assuage antitrust concerns.

Sports
5:11 am
Wed November 13, 2013

After Decades, Braves To Move To Suburban Atlanta

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 6:57 am

The Atlanta Braves will abandon downtown for a new stadium in suburban Cobb County. The Braves have played in the city for almost 50 years, and the news came as a big shock to residents.

Sweetness And Light
3:24 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Why Has Football Become So Brutish?

Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito (left) and tackle Jonathan Martin stand on the field during practice in Davie, Fla. Martin left the NFL after he faced harassment from Incognito that his lawyer said went "beyond locker-room hazing."
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 11:08 am

Not surprisingly, in the explosive revelations about the Miami Dolphins team turmoil, most attention has been paid to the fact that, in the midst of a locker room predominately composed of African-American players, a white, Richie Incognito, slurred a black teammate, Jonathan Martin, with the ugliest racial epithet –– and was actually publicly supported by some blacks on the team. Incognito's sadistic employment of the word has not only sickened but also astounded most of us.

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
3:23 am
Wed November 13, 2013

How A Free Bus Shuttle Helped Make A Small Town Take Off

There were 1.5 million boardings on the Emery Go Round last year. Zikhona Tetana, a visiting scientist from South Africa, is taking the Emery Go Round to a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory facility in Emeryville. "It's convenient and always on time," she says.
Cindy Carpien NPR

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 3:18 pm

This story is part of an ongoing project on commuting in America.

What's known as the "last mile" of a commute can be the Holy Grail for many city transportation planners. How do you get people from their major mode of transportation – like a train station – to their final destination?

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
3:21 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Forget The Car Keys — This Commute Requires A Paddle

Stephen Linaweaver has been kayaking from Oakland, Calif., to work in San Francisco for four years.
Courtesy of Dan Suyeyasu

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 1:41 pm

This story is part of a project on commuting in America.

We all know what it's like to be stuck in traffic. But what about paddling under it?

For kayak commuter Stephen Linaweaver, there is no rush hour or gnarly gridlock. His biggest commute worry is a really big ship.

Linaweaver kayaks from Oakland, Calif., to his job as a sustainability consultant in San Francisco. His hourlong commute begins at the Port of Oakland each morning at 7.

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Heavy Rotation
3:06 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Heavy Rotation: Download 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Holy Ghost! is getting a lot of play on AllDayPlay.fm.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 5:11 am

Heavy Rotation is a monthly sampler of public radio hosts' favorite songs. Check out past editions here.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Asia
8:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tacloban Took Brunt Of Typhoon Haiyen

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have two perspectives now on the destruction a typhoon left behind in the Philippines. The first is the view from the air. It comes from U.S. Marine Brigadier General Paul Kennedy, who is coordinating an American military effort to help typhoon survivors. Not long ago, General Kennedy stepped on board a helicopter for what he called reconnaissance. He flew over a wide strip of land struck by one of the strongest storms on record.

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Around the Nation
7:44 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Knish Makers To Be Back In Business By Hanukkah

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with an update on the knish shortage. A factory on New York's Long Island produces the Jewish pastry, often stuffed with potatoes. A fire in September disrupted production. The AP quotes a Knish fan saying, My heart is broken. Now the knish makers say they'll be back in production by the start of Hanukah. In the meantime, a chef at Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan says of the shortage, quote: Get over it. Get a life. It's just a knish. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Books News & Features
7:36 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Agatha Christie's Lost 1954 Work Sold As eBook

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

A long lost work by Agatha Christie goes on sale today as an e-book. In 1954, Christie wrote "Hercules Poirot and the Green Shore Folly" to help her church raise funds for stained glass windows. It's about a parlor game of murder. The book is filled with references to local places and even to Christie's home, perhaps clues about her life. We'll all have to engage those little gray cells.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
5:26 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Affordable Care Act's Website Reflects Law's Complexity

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Its MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. We'll get a look this week at how many people have signed up for health insurance on the new government exchanges. According to the Wall Street Journal, fewer than 50,000 people have obtained coverage so far through the federal website. That's well below the government's original forecasts.

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Middle East
5:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Israel Joins Debate Over Nuclear Talks With Iran

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 8:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Asia
5:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Devastates Leyte Province

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's get some perspective now on the destruction in the Philippines.

WERTHEIMER: Almost any death toll we might give today would be unreliable. But we do know that hundreds of thousands of people who survived the storm are now living without shelter. They now face the challenge of finding basics like food and water.

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Television
3:08 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Comcast Deal Puts New Minority-Run Channels In Play

El Rey, which will be targeting a young Latino audience, is being spearheaded by filmmaker Robert Rodriguez, shown at the premiere of his recent film Machete Kills in October.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Rapper and producer Sean "Diddy" Combs, director Robert Rodriguez, and basketball legend Magic Johnson each now has his own new cable TV networks. Their channels were part of a merger deal Comcast made with the FCC to give a shot to new networks owned by African Americans, Latinos and others.

Last month, Combs threw on his classic Puff Daddy alias to welcome millennial viewers to his new music network, Revolt.

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Parallels
3:07 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tripoli Zoo Sees Different Kind Of Cage — One With Migrants

Illegal immigrants captured in the Libyan coastal city of Surman are held at a temporary prison in an eastern district of Tripoli, Libya, on Oct. 19.
Hamza Turkia Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:34 pm

Gun-toting militiamen man the steel gate that leads into the Tripoli zoo. A sign promises a garden of animals. Inside, there are paths that meander through a maze of cages and animal habitats. Monkeys climb trees; hippos submerge themselves in water and lions lounge in the heat.

Just a few hundred yards away, there's a different kind of cage: Inside there are people — migrants waiting to be deported or to prove they are in Libya legally.

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Environment
3:06 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Key West Awash With Plans For Rising Sea Level

A cyclist rides past buckled asphalt in Key West, Fla., after Hurricane Wilma in 2005. Key West experienced widespread flooding with the storm surge.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:00 pm

Florida — especially South Florida — is very flat and very low, and in places like Miami Beach and Key West, buildings are just 3 feet above sea level. Scientists now say there may be a 3-foot rise in the world's oceans by the end of the century.

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Europe
6:58 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Russian Subway Promotion Counts Deep Knee Bends

Riders are being offered a 30-ruble, one-ride ticket if they perform 30 squats. A machine counts your deep knee bends and dispenses a ticket, if you finish 30 in two minutes. It's a promotion ahead of the winter Olympics in Russia.

Around the Nation
6:42 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Bacon Deodorant: What Will They Come Up With Next?

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

We have bacon soda and baconnaise - that's bacon flavored mayonnaise. But apparently there are no limits to what bacon can be. Now we have bacon deodorant. The Seattle company J&D's Food has produced Power Bacon, a bacon-scented deodorant stick coming out just in time for the holidays. So for the bacon lover in your life, permission to sweat like a pig.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
4:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks Break, To Resume Later This Month

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 am

Negotiators from Iran and a six-nation group are scheduled to resume talks on Iran's nuclear program in 10 days. Talks ended on Saturday after an agreement was not reached on an initial proposal to ease international sanctions against Tehran in return for some restraints on its nuclear program.

Analysis
4:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Since Post-Vietnam Era, Fewer Veterans In Congress

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:35 am

The camaraderie that veterans talk about used to be true in Congress too — partly because many members had served in the military. But today's Congress has very few veterans in its ranks, about 20 percent, compared with more than three-quarters in the post-Vietnam era. What does that number mean politically.

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